A million plastic bottles a minute

Discussion in 'Present & Current Events' started by nivek, Oct 20, 2017.

  1. August

    August Metanoia

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  2. CasualBystander

    CasualBystander Celestial

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  3. 3FEL9

    3FEL9 Islander

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    Well No

    Once the brittains get their recycleing workin properly all the bacteria will starve and have to migrate to the U.S to chew on your discarded bottles
     
  4. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    Coca-Cola is being slammed for its massive solution to the 'plastics epidemic' as critics call for a world where plastic bottles are extinct

    • Coca-Cola announced on Friday that for every bottle it sells, it will recycle the equivalent number of bottles.
    • Greenpeace slammed Coca-Cola for focusing on recycling, instead of making moves to decrease its use of single-serve plastic bottles.
    • Coca-Cola's CEO said that if Coke can manage to recycle the equivalent of 100% of its packaging, "there's no such thing as a single-use bottle."
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  5. 3FEL9

    3FEL9 Islander

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    Interesting. 100 %. Possible ? Yes/No ?.. Atleast its a good move. Gotta giv em that..

    They will have to set up working recycling centers in 100 dreds of countries.. And work out some incentive for their sugar drinkers
    to bring them bottles there..

    But it works here.. So.. Maybe then. But 100% thats a dream figure, unless they're gonna recycle other brands to make up for the lost ones
     
  6. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    It seems that the one time use without incentive to recycle is the real sticky point...What's the use of building a hundred or two hundred recycle centers if the recycling contribution is low, the consumer must take some initiative and responsibility if any recycling plan is to work...
     
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  7. 3FEL9

    3FEL9 Islander

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    I get 1 SEK back for overy PET bottle I return.. Peanuts.. But after a few months it adds up
     
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  8. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    Here in my region no monies given for recycling plastic, only glass bottles or aluminum cans, plastic recycling isn't promoted nor properly encouraged...
     
  9. 3FEL9

    3FEL9 Islander

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    Well, I cant think they just get thrown on the side walk. Probably put in your trasch and more or less properly burnt in a CHP plant ? so you'll get electricity and heat back
     
  10. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    Many homes that have trash service like mine do have recycle bins for cardboard, plastic, glass, and aluminium cans...They pick up every week but that is it, if you go to a store and purchase a bottle of soda there are only trash bins for everything, no separate bin for recycle, unless you carry the plastic bottle around until you get home and put it in your own recycle bin...Where I work they do not promote recycling, no recycle bins, it all goes with the regular trash...
     
  11. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    Toxic plastic particles are found in 75% of deep sea fish in the Northwest Atlantic, and scientists warn they could be passed on to humans

    Plastic particles have been found in almost three-in-four deep sea fish, according to a new study.

    The research, which looked at marine life in the Northwest Atlantic, is one of the highest ever reported frequencies of so-called 'microplastics' in fish worldwide.

    As well as causing internal physical damage, inflammation of intestines and reduced feeding in fish, the toxic particles can be passed up the food chain to humans.
     
  12. CasualBystander

    CasualBystander Celestial

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    This statement is dumbass.

    Fish are gutted before we eat them.

    The particles are passed up the food chain in the ocean, because tuna don't gut and fillet their prey before they eat thme.
     
  13. 3FEL9

    3FEL9 Islander

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    How many plastic bottles have been produced since this thread was created back in October ?
     
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  14. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    So terrible...

    Sperm whale found dead on the Spanish coast was killed after swallowing 64lbs of PLASTIC waste including bags, nets, ropes and a jerry can

    A sperm whale found dead on the coast of southern Spain was killed by swallowing 29 kilos (64 pounds) of plastic, government officials have confirmed. During an autopsy of the creature, investigators uncovered plastic bags, netting and a jerry can in the whale's digestive system.

    The death of the marine mammal has prompted authorities to launch a campaign against dumping plastic waste at sea.

    The body of the young male sperm whale, which was around 10 metres (33 feet) long and weighed more than six tonnes, was discovered washed ashore at Cabo de Palos in Mercia at the end of February.

    Experts at the region's El Valle Wildlife Rescue Centre, which carried out the procedure, said it had been unable to digest or excrete the plastic it ingested. The official cause of death was peritonitis, an infection of the inner lining of the stomach.



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  15. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    Another sad reality, we are ruining everything....

    PLASTIC HUMANS

    It appears that by 2020 human beings will increasingly become ‘plasticated’. It is not just the water we drink but also the food we eat.

    Plastic microbeads that were popular with companies making body wash liquids were banned because those small beads, ostensibly to exfoliate skin, were being eaten by fish and making it up to the food chain.

    Huge floating islands of plastics in the oceans are being weathered down into smaller and smaller bits which will eventually make it back to human foods.

    Many livestock animals in India, particularly cattle, have been found with several kilograms of plastic inside. And in India, an absence of food-safe plastics in many outlets means that we inadvertently consume plastics as well.

    It is fairly apparent that plastics have invaded our food chain and removing them completely will be impossible in the short term. A start though should be made by strictly enforcing the plastic bag ban and by enforcing recycling norms.

    The study also commented that only 50 per cent of all the bottles were recycled, an innovative use for many old plastic bottles is making sports jerseys, but more needs to be done to reuse plastic and other synthetic products like synthetic rubber in both car tires and chewing gum.

    While there may be no obvious health impacts of this increased plastification today, but it is almost certain that there will be a negative health impact on future generations. And unless we act upon the plastic problem by establishing norms now, we run the risk of the problem becoming far worse tomorrow
     
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  16. Zeke

    Zeke Infrequent

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    Solution 1: I bought a stand and now get a 5 Gallon reusable drum of water that I pour into quality double hulled metal bottles. Zero plastic bottles.

    [​IMG]

    Solution 2: I'm working on finding quality reusable bags to use for groceries. I experimented with a belt design that would hold a bag, but not workable enough. Trouble is we forget to bring such bags with us to the storeI find.

    I think both plastic bottles and bags should be illegal. California has made the bags illegal so far. I would implement fines so it's not profitable to use them.
     
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  17. CasualBystander

    CasualBystander Celestial

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    Well...

    That's what he gets for being an indiscriminate eater.
     
  18. 3FEL9

    3FEL9 Islander

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    I'm upsetting my local superstore by reusing their plastic bags many times over to carry food home..

    Infact, I was questioned once,, why I refused to buy one, lol

    Best thing is to accidently bring the wrong brand and use their competitors,,, (they are located in same place )

    Besides they are making something like a 300 % profit on them...
     
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  19. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    This is a cut-away from a recent article published in Nature acknowledging the rapidly growing problem, but it seems to me its still all talk, no action...


    Marine plastic pollution

    Although there is broad-based recognition of the problem of marine pollution, the challenge in addressing marine plastic pollution reflects the complexity of a multi-faceted problem. A vast majority of marine plastic pollution derives from land-based sources 4.8–12.7 million metric tonnes of plastic annually, so a sole focus on marine oriented solutions is insufficient.

    The sources of such plastics are equally diverse, from commercial and recreational ships and vessels, fishing and aquaculture operations (rope, waste, fishing gear, nets) to land based sources, street litter, dumping, packaging (including plastic bags), plastic sheeting and production waste.

    Our growing understanding of the insidious and deleterious impacts of micro-sized (1 µm–1 mm) and nano-sized (<1 µm) plastic particles has further emphasized the environmental threat marine plastics pose. Micro-plastics are derived either from small particles developed for specific applications, or produced through the breakdown of larger items.

    Micro-sized and nano-sized plastic particles are increasingly being consumed by marine life that confuse them with food sources. These particles specifically, and plastic pollution in general, are being found in marine life in isolated areas indicating the pervasive nature of such pollution.

    A way forward

    There remains a number of challenges in addressing the problem of marine plastic pollution.

    In 1967, calls for a refocus on the ‘common heritage’ of the world’s seas and oceans led to concerted and revolutionary action by the world community to address concerns and challenges.

    In late 2017, the United Nations Environment Assembly resolution on marine plastic pollution serves a similar purpose. The meeting, with broad based agreement from participating states and non-governmental organisations, may well provide the impetus for ongoing action to combat marine plastic pollution.

    International agreements are not easily developed and are often criticised for the time taken to reach agreements and the tendency for a minimal tolerable consensus to shape outcomes. Despite these criticisms, the international framework for ocean governance continues to evolve.

    International initiatives addressing marine plastic pollution need to be supported by strong and focused scientific research, the engagement of business and community organisations, as well as engaged and committed government action on different scales, supporting community-based programs that address the use and disposal of plastics.



    Plastic pollution of the world’s seas and oceans as a contemporary challenge in ocean governance
     
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  20. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    So plastic humans is a reality?...

    We Swallow More Than 100 tiny Plastics In Every Meal

    We could be swallowing more than 100 tiny plastic particles with every main meal, a Heriot-Watt study has revealed.

    The plastic, which can come from soft furnishings and synthetic fabrics, gets into household dust which falls on plates and is consumed.

    The university academics made the discovery after putting Petri dishes containing sticky dust traps on the table next to dinner plates in three homes at meal times.


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    Up to 14 pieces of plastic were found in the Petri dishes at the end of a 20-minute meal – the equivalent of 114 plastic fibres falling on the average dinner plate given their much larger size.

    The scientists, from Heriot-Watt University concluded that the average person swallows up to 68,415 potentially dangerous plastic fibres a year simply through sitting down to eat.

    The researchers set out to compare plastic fibres found in mussels with the amount in the average household meal.

    They found fewer than two microplastics in each mussel, which could be linked to the marine environment, and concluded that the average person can expect to consume 100 plastic particles a year through eating the shellfish.

    But they will ingest anything from 13,731 to 68,415 fibres in a year during meals because of household dust.

    Dr Ted Henry, senior author of the study and professor of environmental toxicology at Heriot-Watt University, said: “These results may be surprising to some people who may expect the plastic fibres in seafood to be higher than those in household dust.

    “We do not know where these fibres come from, but it is likely to be inside the home and the wider environment.”

    The plastic fibres found in the home-cooked meals did not come from the food or the cooking environment, but household dust, the authors believe.

    Eating is the way in which humans can ingest this dust, as well as breathing it in from the air.

    Julian Kirby, of Friends of the Earth, added: “Plastic microfibres found in the dust in our homes and the air we breathe can come from car tyres, carpets and soft furnishings, as well as clothes such as fleece jackets.

    “These are regularly shedding tiny bits of plastic into the environment as they are worn away.

    “We urgently need the Government to adopt an action plan to end plastic pollution and research the possible impacts of environmental plastic on human health.”
     
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