News Clips

Discussion in 'Present & Current Events' started by Toroid, May 29, 2018.

  1. August

    August Metanoia

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  2. pigfarmer

    pigfarmer tall, thin, irritable

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    [​IMG]

    Worth reading. He did a lot more than fly.
     
  3. pigfarmer

    pigfarmer tall, thin, irritable

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    Hey @Dejan Corovic check this out. Think Cyberdyne developed this one?

    Nuclear scientist killed by satellite-controlled machine gun that "zoomed in" on his face, Iran says - CBS News

    Nuclear scientist killed by satellite-controlled machine gun that "zoomed in" on his face, Iran says

    December 7, 2020 / 11:42 AM / AFP



    A satellite-controlled machine gun with "artificial intelligence" was used in last week's assassination of a top nuclear scientist in Iran, the deputy commander of the Revolutionary Guards told local media Sunday. Mohsen Fakhrizadeh was driving on a highway outside Iran's capital Tehran with a security detail of 11 guards on November 27, when the machine gun "zoomed in" on his face and fired 13 rounds, said rear-admiral Ali Fadavi.


    The machine gun was mounted on a Nissan pickup and "focused only on martyr Fakhrizadeh's face in a way that his wife, despite being only 25 centimetres away, was not shot," Mehr news agency quoted him as saying.


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    It was being "controlled online" via a satellite and used an "advanced camera and artificial intelligence" to make the target, he claimed.
    Fadavi said that Fakhrizadeh's head of security took four bullets "as he threw himself" on the scientist and that there were "no terrorists at the scene."

    Iranian authorities have blamed arch foe Israel and the exiled opposition group the People's Mujahedeen of Iran, known as MEK, for the assassination.

    State-run Press TV had previously said "made in Israel" weapons were found at the scene.
    Various accounts of the scientist's death have emerged since the attack, with the defense ministry initially saying he was caught in a firefight with his bodyguards, while semi-official Fars news agency claimed "a remote controlled automatic machine gun" killed him, without citing any sources.

    According to Iran's defense minister, Amir Hatami, Fakhrizadeh was one of his deputies and headed the ministry's Defense and Research and Innovation Organization, focusing on the field of "nuclear defense."
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  4. 1963

    1963 Noble

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    [​IMG]
    :lol4:
     
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  5. karl 12

    karl 12 Honorable

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    Ha think that one's being reported as a hoax mate but considering the craziness going on in the world today it could very well be true.

    Have to say considering she's a health expert she doesn't look very healthy.


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  6. The shadow

    The shadow The shadow knows!

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  8. The shadow

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  10. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    Four-month-old ravens just as intelligent as adult apes, study suggests

    The cognitive capabilities of four-month-old ravens are on par with those of full-grown apes, according to a new study published Thursday in the journal Scientific Reports.

    Researchers subjected different-aged ravens to a series of experimental tasks to test the birds' spatial memory, communication abilities and learning capacity. They also tested the ravens' ability to understand relative numbers and addition, as well as their ability to grasp object permanence -- the understanding that an object still exists when it is out of sight.

    "For instance, to investigate whether ravens know where food is located, we hid treats under a cup, and moved it quickly back and forth among other cups that were empty, just as one does in the 'shell game,'" study co-author Miriam Sima said in a news release.

    "A raven selected a cup by pecking or pointing at it with its beak, while a chimpanzee would have done this with their fingers," said Sima, researcher with the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Germany.

    Testing revealed all eight hand-raised ravens, ages 4, 8, 12 and 16 months, to be of similar intelligence, suggesting the species' cognitive capabilities develop at a rather rapid pace. It makes sense that ravens reach cognitive maturity by four months. Around the same time, the birds tend to first exert their independence and begin exploring their surroundings.

    The ravens showed individual differences in their cognitive capabilities, but overall, the eight birds were best at addition and understanding relative numbers, and less adept at spatial memory.

    When the authors of the new study compared the performance of the ravens with those of 106 chimpanzees and 32 orangutans, they found the birds -- with the exception of spatial memory -- were just as cognitively capable as the apes.

    Authors of the new study suggest the tests show the intelligence of ravens isn't specific to their domain. Their cognitive skills, scientists contend, are exemplary of an impressive general intelligence. "Our results suggest that ravens are not only social intellects but have also developed sophisticated cognitive skills for dealing with the physical world," researchers wrote.

    In followup studies, researchers hope to design tests that reveal the more species-specific cognitive skills.

    news-raven.jpg
     
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  11. The shadow

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  12. August

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  13. August

    August Metanoia

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  14. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    New York Times’ 'Caliphate' debacle should teach Americans ‘not to trust’ once-proud paper, critics say

    The New York Times’ latest gaffe is so egregious that some critics feel the paper’s credibility has been permanently torched.

    The Times published an extensive correction on Friday after acknowledging its 2018 podcast series "Caliphate" heavily relied on a serial fabulist who claimed to have been a member of the Islamic State (ISIS) terrorist organization. The debacle was so embarrassing for the once-proud newspaper that Executive Editor Dean Baquet called it an "institutional failing" and the Times even returned a coveted Peabody Award that the project earned.


    The "Caliphate" blunder is the latest in a series of embarrassing moments and public relations nightmares for the Times in recent memory, such as the controversial 1619 project and the chaos that unfolded when the paper printed an op-ed by Sen. Tom Cotton headlined "Send in the Troops" at the height of nationwide protests following the death of George Floyd in police custody.

    As a result of the Cotton op-ed, liberal staffers publicly bashed the paper and the backlash eventually resulted in then-editorial page editor James Bennet’s abrupt exit after internal backlash. Shortly afterward, then-star columnist and editor Bari Weiss quit with a scathing resignation letter saying she was bullied by colleagues in an "illiberal environment" weeks after declaring there was a "civil war" inside the paper.

    All this occurred as the paper was regularly accused of unfairly treating President Trump while downplaying or simply dismissing stories that could hurt prominent Democrats.

    "The Times has lit its credibility on fire over the last few years. From baseless anti-Trump conspiracy theories to the laughably error-riddled 1619 and now to this," conservative strategist Chris Barron told Fox News. "The Times might ask themselves why this keeps happening over and over again?"

    (More on the link)

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  15. Toroid

    Toroid Founding Member

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    www.youtube.com/watch?v=4uiABtFyGPY
     
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  16. The shadow

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  17. Rikki

    Rikki High Priestess

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  18. pigfarmer

    pigfarmer tall, thin, irritable

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    They're STILL fiddling around with his ashes? At last, he's entered standard orbit


    News & Opinion | December 28, 2020 10:15 am
    How “Star Trek” Actor James Doohan’s Ashes Were Secretly Transported to the International Space Station
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    Though they weren’t beamed up, the ashes of Star Trek actor James Doohan were smuggled aboard the International Space Station more than a decade ago.

    The remains of Doohan, who portrayed USS Enterprise engineer Montgomery “Scotty” Scott on the classic sci-fi show, were brought to and hidden on the ISS by video game developer Richard Garriott in 2008 during a 12-day mission he made as a private astronaut, according to The Times of London.

    Doohan, who died at the age of 85 in 2005, had always wanted to go to space but two previous requests to bring his ashes to ISS made by his son Chris were denied. So, with the backing of Doohan’s son, Garriott undertook the secret mission to get the ashes on board.

    According to Garriott, he put some of Doohan’s ashes inside a laminated picture of the actor and then tucked the phtoto under the carpeting on the floor of the space station’s Columbus module.

    Since he did not have permission to bring the ashes onto the ISS, Garriott and Doohan’s family kept the story a secret in order to make sure there was no problem with the Russian or U.S. space agencies.

    “It was completely clandestine,” Garriott told The Times. “His family was very pleased that the ashes made it up there but we were all disappointed we didn’t get to talk about it publicly for so long. Now enough time has passed that we can. As far as I know, no one has ever seen it there and no one has moved it. James Doohan got his resting place among the stars.”

    The Times estimates that Doohan’s ashes have traveled about 1.7 billion miles across space and orbited the Earth more than 70,000 times.

    How a "Star Trek" Actor's Ashes Were Secretly Transported to the International Space Station
     
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  19. The shadow

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