A million plastic bottles a minute

Discussion in 'Present & Current Events' started by nivek, Oct 20, 2017.

  1. Standingstones

    Standingstones Celestial

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    2,420
    All that plastic will be sitting in a landfill for decades to come. I am betting it will give radioactive waste a run for its money! Just kidding.
     
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  2. pigfarmer

    pigfarmer tall, thin, irritable

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    6,478
    If you ever have the chance to spend time up in the rafters of large warehouses it's common to find a rubbery smelling dusty funk all over everything - from fork lifts and many years. I never thought about cars that way - all that crap has to go somewhere.
     
  3. JahaRa

    JahaRa Noble

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    902
    I have quit using plastic wrap and baggies/zip lock bags in my kitchen, using reusable silicone instead, but I still buy products that come in plastic containers. I found a company that recycles plastics to make their products but you have to pay them to take the plastic. Quite frustrating. Our recycling plant has caught fire a few times so I don't think they have found a way to recycle the plastic since they can't sell it to china anymore. There is a young girl that has started a business, Bring your own bottle, and she sells shampoo and other liquid soaps that you can buy by the ounce and put in your own container. It is a good business model and used to be the norm in co-ops in the 80's.
     
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  4. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    This is interesting technology I've not heard of previously...

     
  5. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    27,467
  6. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    Plastic ‘Pool’ Toy Pollution in the Wild
    Summer Brings a Macro Microplastic Problem to Natural Waterways


    A new trend of pool toys containing glitter and microbeads is complicating the already pervasive environmental problem of microplastic pollution.

    University of California, Davis, scientists studying plastics pollution encourage beach-goers to take care to leave natural waterways as clean or cleaner than they found them this summer by reducing their use of all forms of plastic at the beach and leaving pool toys full of microbeads and glitter at home.

    ‘A microplastics bomb’

    Pool toys are intended for use in pools, where, if they break, the damage is limited to that pool. But such toys are often brought to lakes, oceans, rivers and other water bodies. When they burst, their glittery, beady contents spill across the water and pollute aquatic and human environments.

    Alison Toy, education program manager of the UC Davis Tahoe Environmental Sciences Center, or TERC, came upon such a scene at Lake Tahoe’s Moon Dunes Beach in early July. Thousands of tiny foam balls floated across the surface. She quickly shared the damage and the offending pool toy on her Instagram account, which spurred a cleanup and regional media interest.

    “It was like a microplastics bomb exploded on the beach,” said Toy’s colleague Katie Senft, a TERC field researcher who studies microplastics. “It was heartbreaking to see polyethylene balls all over our beautiful shoreline.”

    Senft is leading a research project to determine the fate of microplastics at Lake Tahoe. It involves trawling for plastics and examining the bellies of fish and clams to understand food chain impacts. A microplastic is about the size of a rice grain or smaller. Senft has found fragments of toys, bottles, diapers, chip bags and more.

    All that glitters

    A 2015 study from UC Davis estimated that 8 trillion microbeads alone are emitted every day into U.S. waters. Pool floats full of microbeads and glitter that can smash against rocks and rip open add a troublesome layer.

    “Glitter is impossible to clean up in your house,” Senft said. “Imagine trying to clean it up from a lake or beach.”

    Jenessa Gjeltema, assistant professor of zoological medicine at the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, conducts plastic analysis while also working to improve methodology to more accurately assess the health impacts of plastics in the environment. With her background in practicing veterinary medicine for wildlife, she’s interested in the interrelated impacts of plastics on wildlife, humans and the environment.

    “Think about how many particles you might release in a simple teaspoon of glitter,” Gjeltema said. “What may have been intended to be used for only a few minutes may then remain in the environment for hundreds or thousands of years. Glitter may seem like a wonderful magical moment, but it’s a moment that extends for such a long time afterward, and we are only at the tip of the iceberg of learning what the effects of that will be.”

    Gjeltema notes that some of the known impacts for wildlife and ecosystems include:

    • Entanglements. While tangled sea turtles may come to mind, tiny plankton can get twined up in microplastics, too.
    • Microbeads are often the size and shape of a fish egg, and wildlife can and do mistake them for food.
    • Plastics contain a variety of potentially harmful chemicals, which are released over time into the environment.
    • Plastics can serve as a vehicle for hazardous substances. For instance, plastic can absorb pollutants from the environment and transfer them to animals, like filter-feeding mussels at a lake or ocean bottom.

    (More on the link)

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  7. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    Baby Turtles Are Eating a Disturbing Amount of Plastic

    (Excerpt)

    The researchers found that more turtles ingested plastic in the Pacific Ocean than the Indian Ocean. Four in five flatback and green sea turtles contained plastic, while 86% of loggerhead turtles did, and about one-third of the olive ridley turtles the team found across the Pacific basin. In the Indian Ocean, only 28% of flatback turtles contained plastic, followed by 21% of loggerheads, and 9% of green turtles.

    This was no trace amount of plastic, either. Green turtles consumed as much as 1% of their total body mass in plastic, and for flatback turtles that number was up to 2%. It’s the equivalent of an NFL linebacker eating five pounds (2.3 kilograms) of plastic.

    The types of plastic also differed between the two oceans. “Plastic in the Pacific turtles was mostly hard fragments, which could come from a vast range of products used by humans, while Indian Ocean plastics were mostly fibers—possibly from fishing ropes or nets,” said Emily Duncan, a conservation biologist at University of Exeter and the study’s lead author, in a press release. (Those fishing ropes and nets are also a deadly danger for large species like sharks.)

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  8. HAL9000

    HAL9000 Honorable

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    289
    On a related subject.

    Have you noticed that course ground glass is being added to concrete breeze blocks ?

    I see a problem as cement does not adhere to glass.

    These blocks can't be as strong as the traditional ones.

    And I have 92 of them.
     
  9. Area201

    Area201 cold fusion

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    931
    I've switched to 5gal drums that I reuse for water in the house for coffee and tea.

    But I still am stuck using 20-30% of drinks in plastic bottles as they don't provide an option (HINT water). Switched to aluminum cans whenever possible (dr pepper).

    Plastic bags already discontinued in supermarkets here, if I had it my way, I'd make plastic water bottles illegal.
     
  10. JahaRa

    JahaRa Noble

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    902
    There is a company that sells water in cartons ( like milk cartons) called Boxed Water is Better. You can get it at Cost Plus/World Market and online,. And there is one that is now selling in aluminum cans (I think it is Dasani but not sure).

    I have a 4 gallon water filter system that I use and I have drinking glasses with lids and straw that I use instead of bottles.
     
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  11. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    People also forget about all the plastic clothing worn today and continually washed with those microplastic particles discrded in the wash and going into the water systems then eventually those clothes are discarded...Do you wear polyester clothing, nylon, spandex and a few others?...

    ...
     
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  12. JahaRa

    JahaRa Noble

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    902
    And all the microfiber cleaning cloths, sheets, towels etc.
     
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