Crazy Random Thought Of the Day: Is the Speed of light Static?

Discussion in 'Science, Tech, & Space Exploration' started by Shadowprophet, Dec 3, 2017.

  1. Shadowprophet

    Shadowprophet Truthiness

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    [​IMG]

    I'm just curious about what you guys think. Yes, I know on paper the speed of light is constant. But.
    I'm thinking about how space-time can be seen through gravitational lensing. to some degree, those photons are manipulated by spacetimes pull at that body of mass. So. If those photons are affected by space-time. Would that not mean that the speed of the light affected was altered?

    Meaning not consistent or static?

    For that matter, Inside a star because of the amazing gravity, It takes photons hundreds of thousands of years to make it from the center of a star to the surface. And what about a black hole that can just trap light completely. If the speed of light can be tangibly affected. then light is not a constant static speed. It can't be..
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2017
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  2. August

    August Metanoia

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    Light doesn’t always travel at the speed of light. A new experiment has revealed that focusing or manipulating the structure of light pulses reduces their speed, even in vacuum conditions.
     
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  3. Shadowprophet

    Shadowprophet Truthiness

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    This is Good. I've been really wondering about this for a while. Now that light can be considered a relative force. Perhaps Light can have genuine quantum properties.
     
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  4. Kchoo

    Kchoo At Peace.

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    If light can be slowed down, we are on our way to building our next generation five speed.

    *Shadow flies out in his new light driven ulev.*
     
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  5. CasualBystander

    CasualBystander Celestial

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    You are getting wavelength separation because your prism is shaped funny. Use a normal prism (or a pane of glass).

    [​IMG]


    Fine-structure constant

    ε - Permittivity - Wikipedia

    It takes photons hundreds of thousands of years - look up global warming theory - same effect.
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2017
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  6. Shadowprophet

    Shadowprophet Truthiness

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    In this case though. I'm thinking about space-time. could not space-time itself, act as a prism for photons seeing as gravitational lensing seems to be a focal point for light?
     

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