Deadly Wuhan Coronavirus

Discussion in 'End Times & Conspiracies' started by nivek, Jan 16, 2020.

  1. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    That's exactly what vaccines are supposed to do, prevent one from getting sick from whatever it's preventing by training the body to build immunity...Measles vaccines, Yellow fever vaccine, etc all designed to prevent getting those illnesses, however, when I was in the military I got the yellow fever shot before going overseas and I got really sick afterwards...I was sick as hell for about 10 days or so lol...

    If the covid vaccines allow one to get sick but minimizes the illness to mild symptoms so be it...That's all we got right now...

    ...
     
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  2. Dr_Doom

    Dr_Doom Honorable

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    Indeed mate and that’s all we do have atm. Most vaccines for this do not protect you from getting the virus, they minimise the symptoms so we don’t need to utilise health care and not make us so ill. People should still social distance and wear a mask to avoid spreading it.

    This will be the new norm for a while yet, expect yearly boosters like the flu vaccine.

    My wife a is a front line Nurse. Poor soul comes home most days upset. Annoys the hell out of my that our Healthcare professionals are risking their necks, and some people just don’t care.

    just last week in the supermarket. We are supposed to social distance a wear a mask. Some old guy ignored the markings on the floor and started to load the belt right at my shoulder. So I nicely said, would he mind moving to the markings on the floor. “Oh it’s ok son, I don’t have the virus”, “ yeah but I might, I sleep next to someone every night that deals with positives and dead people”. He shat himself, and moved away.

    oh and yeah, Doom is on!
     
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  3. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    Yep, an unfortunate reality...

    Indeed it is, thanks China!...

    Btw great to see you again, missed you...Hope you and your wife stay safe and well with this mess we're in, 'pandemically' speaking lol...

    ...
     
  4. AD1184

    AD1184 Noble

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    I would imagine that a vaccinated population will reduce the transmissibility of coronavirus, even if it does not completely prevent it. If enough people are vaccinated, even if the vaccine is imperfect, a herd immunity effect may be possible.

    Among vaccinated individuals, I would expect that some are prevented from being infected with the virus completely during transmission events that would have otherwise seen them become infected. Others will become infected but less likely to pass it on to others. Still others may be infected and infectious after acquiring coronavirus, but will be kept out of the hospital.

    In a few months, we will know more, if we begin to see a population-level effect in reduced rates of infection.
     
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  5. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    Realistically I think it will be springtime next year before the dust settles and we know more about where we are with this pandemic and if we have a handle on things...There's too many things muddling the waters right now between these new variants spreading everywhere, then social issues with lock downs or partial lock downs or none, and then we have antivaxx and antimask fools with covid deniers mixed in that rabble stymying efforts and then shortages of vaccines causing instability in some countries...This situation as a whole can become more volatile before it gets better, time will tell...

    ...
     
  6. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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  7. ImmortalLegend527

    ImmortalLegend527 The Messenger Of All Gods old and new

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    It's funny how they programmed the humans to believe that it started in Wuhan at the market..as if he caught it and instantly died at the market. It takes about 2 weeks to get sick. I wonder do humans ever think, where was he at during those 2 weeks?

    It's sad the truth may never be told for how long, lol it really was out way before that event. Just sad indeed.

    Greatest secret ever told.

    I understand why you had to do it. It ain't that much food left in the world to feed 7 billion people on an everyday basis plus the other factors.

    Just to let you know. Your plan backfired. A lot of mad countries and villains of the world are currently evolving the covid. Hundreds of mad scientists around the world are enhancing the covid. Its something that I believe was not in your plans as you were planning.

    You all play god with the populace as if their animals or test subjects. We understand why but what's about to happen will be in your hands and your soul but that's if your kind has a soul.

    The news that you created is programming the humans into thinking that the virus is mutating but in reality, it's being created to mutate by humans in labs that hate earth as well as certain countries.

    Us 4th eye users are upset and we have determined that starting in February, we will go to war specifically against your programs. You will be exposed starting February 14. The Valentine's day program massacre. We've been silent at this time in this time frame.

    The Tallings, the grays, the other side of the ice, the ones under the planet, the hard skins, the 51ers, and the rouges. VS The star seeds.

    Our job as well as your job is to make sure the earth survives..you all have broken that rule.

    The war of the programs.

    The Starseeds VS the Half-Humans.

    Our thousand year treaty is officially over.
     
  8. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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  9. AD1184

    AD1184 Noble

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    I am pretty sure I remember hearing very early on in the pandemic about a man in New York, one of the first to be infected with coronavirus, was said in unverified reports in several news outlets to be simultaneously infected with two different strains of Covid. You may recall at that time reports that there were types A, B, and C of SARS-CoV-2, and supposedly the more virulent one established in Europe and a less virulent one established in Asia, and the American West Coast supposedly got the Asian variety and the East Coast the European one.

    It has probably been stricken from the internet as misinformation by Google's censors, because I can't find the story with a search now.
     
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  10. AD1184

    AD1184 Noble

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    It's widely accepted now that the market was not the source of the virus, but merely the site of an early cluster of infection.
     
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  11. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    I think you might be right, I seem to remember something about that back early last year and I had a feeling something about it was posted in this ever growing thread but I searched and didn't find a clue...I also searched using Duckduckgo but came up empty...The article implied those two variants could merge or mutate together into something worse than what we have currently to deal with, that's a huge concern...Also some British experts say it may be 2024 before we get a handle on this pandemic and have some normalcy again, could they be referring to these mutations continuing to hamper our efforts prolonging the pandemic?...If people would really make effort and do what's required to stop the spread of this virus then we wouldn't have all these mutations, the virus needs to duplicate in order to change, stop the spread and we at least narrow the chances of more deadly mutations or drug resistant mutations...There's a vast amount of covid deniers and antimask or antivaxx people in the world also hampering the efforts...

    ...
     
  12. AD1184

    AD1184 Noble

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    I think this story is about the person I am talking about:

    https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/11097...-20-all-have-coronavirus-along-with-neighbor/

    He apparently went to hospital for an extended period. I seem to recall some of the more sensationalist stories suggesting that he had two strains simultaneously.

    I think the appearance of new variants is what is going to cause the pandemic to persist. It wasn't much of a problem for us until December. The prevalence of the existing strain reached a very low level due to restrictions in force, and the situation would likely have been manageable, and vaccination would likely have done for the lingering cases. But the emergence of the Kent variant caused the prevalence of the virus, and the resulting deaths, to skyrocket.

    In the UK, there is something called the ZOE app, which is a symptom tracker that people can voluntarily download. It is a collaboration between a university and a private company to gather data on coronavirus in this country. People submit their daily symptoms, if any, and it also collects anonymised data about them. One of the things that has come out of that is that apparently only 11% of people comply with the full isolation period after coming into close contact with a person infected with Covid. There is also a low level of compliance when people are told that they actually have Covid.

    The lockdown breakers, anti-maskers, anti-vaxxers, and Covid sceptics are actually working counter to their own interests, and the interests of everyone else who wants this thing to end. Their behaviour will prolong the pandemic, and prolong the social restrictions required to manage it. All the while they will be claiming that they want them to end.
     
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  13. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    How The COVID-19 Vaccines Compare To Each Other

    In the race to end the coronavirus pandemic, the more safe, effective vaccines we have available, the sooner we’ll be able to climb out of this mess.

    So far, five vaccines — produced by Moderna, Pfizer, Novavax, Johnson & Johnson and AstraZeneca — are the front-runners. In the coming months, these vaccines will not only save tons of lives, but they will also alleviate some of the overwhelming pressure on the health care system and provide our frontline workers with some much-needed rest.

    Below, where we dissect the leading vaccines, you’ll notice the shots’ efficacy levels range from 66% to 95%. While that may seem like a huge gap, it’s worth noting that comparing vaccine efficacy levels is kind of like “comparing apples to oranges,” according to Onyema Ogbuagu, an infectious disease specialist at Yale Medicine and principal investigator of Yale’s Pfizer COVID-19 trial.

    Some of these vaccines (like Johnson & Johnson’s) were tested in areas where more contagious variants have taken hold, such as South Africa, whereas Moderna’s and Pfizer’s vaccines were tested before the variants identified in the U.K. and South Africa struck and began spreading like wildfire.

    The biggest takeaway is that while the vaccines differ in how well they prevent symptomatic disease, so far nobody who has taken any of these vaccines have died or been hospitalized due to COVID-19. Preventing severe disease is something all the shots do well, so even imperfect vaccines will prove invaluable in our quest to end the pandemic.

    Here’s a basic breakdown on each of the leading COVID-19 immunization options:

    Pfizer/BioNTech
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    How it works: The Pfizer shot is a messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccine, which essentially sends instructions to our cells that teach our immune system how to fight the coronavirus.

    Efficacy: 95% against symptomatic disease

    Dosage: Two shots, 21 or so days apart

    How well it works on COVID-19 mutations: It holds up. A lab study looking at the blood of vaccinated people found the vaccine may be slightly less effective against new variants like the one discovered in South Africa, but it still protects people well. Of course, more evidence of the shot being put to the test in the real world is necessary to validate those findings.

    How easily it can be tweaked to target new variants: Piece of cake. The vaccine can be changed in a couple of days, Ogbuagu said. Pfizer is already working on a booster shot against the mutations. The bigger question is what sort of testing and approval process health officials would require — that’s where there’d be delays.

    Side effects: Most people will feel pain and soreness in the arm where they get the shot. Up to half of people are expected to experience flu-like symptoms such as chills, fatigue and headaches, more so after the second dose. But that’s just the immune system doing its thing.

    How it’s stored: These mRNA vaccines are finicky, and must be stored at subzero temperatures (minus 94 degrees Fahrenheit) in freezers.

    Availability: The phase three trial was completed in winter 2020, and the vaccine is now being distributed to the public through emergency use authorization.

    Takeaway: This was the first vaccine that was approved and rolled out in United States, and the Biden administration has already purchased 100 million more doses. “At least a third of the U.S. population, roughly, will receive the dose of the Pfizer vaccine, and so definitely it will be a major contributor to curbing the epidemic here,” Ogbuagu said.

    Moderna
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    How it works: Like Pfizer, Moderna’s vaccine uses mRNA technology.

    Efficacy: 94.5% against symptomatic disease

    Dosage: Two shots, 28 or so days apart

    How well it works on COVID-19 mutations: The vaccine is thought to be less effective against the variant dominating in South Africa, but a lab study shows the shot can still effectively neutralize the virus and provide protection. We’ll need more data to better understand that, though.

    How easily it can be tweaked to target new variants: Same quick process as Pfizer. Moderna has already kicked off development and testing of a booster shot specifically targeting the variant discovered in South Africa.

    Side effects: Again, similar to Pfizer. Most people will feel pain and soreness in the arm where they get the shot. Up to half of people are expected to experience flu-like symptoms such as chills, fatigue and headaches, more so after the second dose.

    How it’s stored: These must be carefully stored at subzero temperatures (minus 4 degrees Fahrenheit) in freezers.

    Availability: The phase three trial was completed in winter 2020, and the vaccine is now being distributed to the public through emergency use authorization.

    Takeaway: The Biden administration also secured an additional 100 million doses from Moderna, so this shot will likely protect another third of the U.S. population. This puts it “on par” with the Pfizer vaccine, Ogbuagu said.

    Novavax
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    How it works: Novavax’s shot is a protein subunit vaccine. It contains a small, harmless, synthetically produced piece of the coronavirus that trains the immune system how to recognize and dismantle the virus. It does not contain the actual live virus.

    Efficacy: 89.3% against symptomatic disease

    Dosage: Two shots, 21 days or so apart

    How well it works on COVID-19 mutations: Pretty good. Its efficacy is around 85.6% against the variant identified in the U.K. and 60% against the variant found in South Africa.

    How easily it can be tweaked to target new variants: Easily, according to experts. The Novavax team is already developing a booster dose targeting the variant found in South Africa and hopes to test it out in a few months.

    Side effects: Mild pain and tenderness where the shot is given. Some people may experience fatigue, headaches or muscle aches.

    How it’s stored: Basic refrigeration, which is plus. This makes it easier to distribute from a logistical standpoint.

    Availability: The phase three trial concludes in a few weeks, but it may take a couple months before the data is finalized and submitted to the Food and Drug Administration for approval. Novavax expects to be vaccinating people by May or June.

    Takeaway: “It will be a welcome addition to the arsenal of vaccines,” Ogbuagu said. It’s a little less efficacious compared to the mRNA vaccines, but then again, this shot was up against new variants, Ogbuagu said. Others were tested in trials before those became more dominant strains.

    Johnson & Johnson
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    How it works: This type of shot, called a viral vector shot, uses an adenovirus (the type of virus that causes the common cold) to teach our bodies how to identify and fight the coronavirus. It does not cause you to get COVID-19.

    Efficacy: 66% at preventing symptomatic disease, 85% at preventing severe disease, 100% against hospitalization and death

    Dosage: One dose

    How well it works on COVID-19 mutations: Well, but overall efficacy does seem to drop with variants. The vaccine was 72% effective in U.S. trials, 66% in Latin American trials involving the variant that’s dominating Brazil and 57% in South Africa, where the B.1.351 variant has taken hold. Even so, it still provides protection against hospitalization and death.

    How easily it can be tweaked to target new variants: Changing viral vector vaccines isn’t *quite* as simple as modifying mRNA vaccines, but it’s still a fairly easy process without a super long timeline, according to experts.

    Side effects: A small percentage of people (9%) reported having a fever. Others experienced the typical symptoms: fatigue, headaches, muscle pain and injection site pain.

    How it’s stored: Basic refrigeration

    Availability: J&J plans to submit the rest of its safety and efficacy data to the FDA early this month. From there, the FDA will review the data, and if it grants emergency use authorization, people may begin receiving it later this month.

    Takeaway: This one-shot dose could be a game changer for vaccine access and distribution. “That’s one of the wonderful things about it, that it can get to remote and rural areas. Also, this means it can be given in doctors’ offices without having to worry about all the storage [requirements],” said Daniel Fagbuyi, an emergency physician who served as a biodefense expert in the Obama administration.

    Oxford/AstraZeneca
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    How it works: Also adenovirus-based, the AstraZeneca vaccine works like the Johnson & Johnson shot.

    Efficacy: 70% against symptomatic disease

    Dosage: Two doses. In studies, the doses were given between four to 12 weeks apart.

    How well it works on COVID-19 mutations: It appears to work just as well on the variant detected in the U.K., but data is still being collected on how effectively it protects against the variant identified in South Africa.

    How easily it can be tweaked to target new variants: Similar to Johnson & Johnson — slower than an mRNA, but still speedy.

    Side effects: Pain and tenderness at the injection site. Fatigue, headaches, muscle aches, chills and fever have also been reported.

    How it’s stored: Basic refrigeration

    Availability: The phase three trial was completed in fall 2020, and the vaccine is now being distributed in the European Union through emergency authorization use. It’s still being trialed in the U.S. and may not be approved for authorization from the FDA until the spring.

    Takeaway: The inexpensive cost of this vaccine along with its basic storage needs give AstraZeneca a big advantage. It’ll be easier for more health care providers to have the necessary supplies and get the vaccine out into the population, Fagbuyi said.

    Which vaccine should you get?

    Experts say it doesn’t really matter (and you likely won’t have a choice in most cases). Any vaccine you get should do a pretty great job at protecting you against severe illness, along with hospitalization and death.

    From an individual standpoint, a slight dip in efficacy might not make a big difference, but from a population standpoint, it can translate to a lot more people who remain susceptible to getting sick and spreading it to others, Ogbuagu said.

    All of these vaccines working together will help us achieve herd immunity. We really need 65% to 85% of the population to have protection against the virus, Ogbuagu said. And that end goal becomes a lot more realistic when we’ve got a mix of highly efficacious vaccines.

    .
     
  14. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    Hospitalizations from COVID have dropped for 25 days in a row as CDC announces 30.2m people have received at least one vaccine shot and 8.3m Americans have received two doses

    As of Saturday, 8.3 million Americans have received both doses of a vaccine, amounting to 2.5 percent of the total population, according to the Centers for Disease Control. At least one dose has been administered to 30,250,964 million people, the agency added. It comes as COVID-19 hospitalizations have dropped for 25 straight days. The number of people hospitalized has now dropped every day since January 14. In the last three months of 2020, the number hospitalized had only fallen on 14 days. This is also the second week in a row that no state has reported a record for new weekly COVID-19 cases. The U.S. reported 113,927 new infections on Saturday and 2,983 new fatalities.

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  15. August

    August Metanoia

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    Pfizer Covid 19 vaccine uses 0.3 ml vaccine the rest is saline solution in each jab. 6 to 7 jabs per vial if caution is used .
     
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  16. August

    August Metanoia

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  17. The shadow

    The shadow The shadow knows!

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  18. The shadow

    The shadow The shadow knows!

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  19. The shadow

    The shadow The shadow knows!

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  20. wwkirk

    wwkirk Celestial

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