Deadly Wuhan Coronavirus

Discussion in 'End Times & Conspiracies' started by nivek, Jan 16, 2020.

  1. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    They screamed follow the science, hypocrites, maybe he's doing this because he's implying the pandemic needs to go on or he doesn't believe the vaccine works well enough to save him...I remember another President who didn't follow the CDC guidelines and the same people screamed that it was anything but patriotic...

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    How Biden says it’s his ‘patriotic responsibility’ to go against CDC rules

    Biden said he would continue to wear masks outside, calling it a “patriotic responsibility” and “small precaution.”

    President Biden hasn’t been following advice from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to ditch his mask outdoors and around small groups of other vaccinated people because he’s taking "extra precautions," a White House aide said Sunday.

    "You know, we do take some extra precautions for him because he is the President of the United States," said Anita Dunn, a senior advisor in the Biden administration, on CNN’s "State of the Union" when asked about why Biden "doesn’t seem to be following" the new guidance.

    The agency last week announced that vaccinated Americans can ditch face coverings outdoors unless they are at large gatherings like concerts.

    But Biden said he would continue to wear masks outside, calling it a "patriotic responsibility" and "small precaution."

    (More on the link)

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  2. JahaRa

    JahaRa Honorable

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    There is no rule against wearing a mask and this story claims that Biden is "going against" the CDC, when in fact he is not. Everyone should still be wearing masks in public, in large groups, etc. The vaccine is not proven yet. So what is the beef? So what, someone wants to continue wearing a mask. I am not going maskless to the grocery store or Home Depot. Half the country is still not vaccinated and this virus is not seasonal like the flu, it is more robust and keeps mutating. It's mutations are a lot faster than the flu.

    In case you have a problem understanding English, the CDC did not make a "stop wearing masks after you are vaccinated" mandate, it only says you can stop wearing a mask so Biden is NOT going against any CDC rule. Jeez, I hate the media and the zombies that choose a side and spread hate based on lies and inference.
     
  3. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    The CDC said no mask outdoors for vaccinated people, Biden should abide by the CDC for the bad stuff and the good stuff, he is allegedly representing the country and sends a false message by not listening to the CDC when he was one of those screaming to follow the science during the campaign...So if the science says wear a mask, wear it, when the science says its safe to take the mask off then take it off, simple...I think he would love to have this pandemic stretched out a couple more years to have more control and power...

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  4. JahaRa

    JahaRa Honorable

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    The CDC did not say it was mandated, it said it was not necessary. If Biden or anyone else who has been vaccinated still wants to wear a mask outdoors where they may encounter others who may or may not have been vaccinated or exposed, it is no reason to try to denigrate them which, by the wording of the headline was exactly the intention of the article. In my opinion this is not different than fat shaming.
     
  5. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    If it was you or me who chose to ignore the CDC no one would care, but this is the representative of the American people and after all that drama and screaming from him and his party to follow the science then for Biden to ignore the CDC is foolish and ignorant and sends the wrong message...Say one thing and do another, typical political posturing and back talk...

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  6. JahaRa

    JahaRa Honorable

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    429
    Like I said before, it shouldn't matter whether our president wears a mask or not. My point is that the article is slanted in an attempt to make him look foolish, and an attempt to shame anyone who may agree with him. It is distrating drivel made to justify hate of one form or another. He is not spreading hate like his predecessor did so they are making crap up to get people to think he is foolish. You are falling for it. Would you shame your grandpa for wearing a mask outside when he is surrounded by people like Biden is when he is outside?

    I don't wear a mask outside but I have one on hand so that if I happen to encounter someone too close (in my opinion, not the CDC's) I can put it on.
     
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  7. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    I'm not falling for anything, I'm using logic and reason over ignorance, my grandson father doesn't represent the country, but Biden does and there's idiots out there that will follow and listen to him just as there were idiots listening to Trump and Obama and Bush, etc etc...Theres too many people who don't think for themselves but will listen to their political flavour...So if Biden continues to flaunt the CDC so will the useful idiots following his words and actions...We don't need this pandemic stretched out any longer than it has to be and Biden just makes it worse by ignoring the science just like his predecessor did, its no different, two ends of the same stick IMO...

    Honestly I think vaccinated people should not be wearing masks anymore but I'm not one of those so-called experts, 'I'm a simple man making his way through the galaxy'...:Whistle:

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  8. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    Antibody drug neutralizes virus variants in lab study; COVID-19 antibodies detectable 12 months after infection

    An experimental monoclonal antibody treatment for COVID-19 being developed by Eli Lilly and Co and AbCellera Biologics Inc can "potently" neutralize numerous coronavirus variants, including those first identified in the UK, Brazil, South Africa, California and New York, scientists have found in test tube experiments.

    The antibody - known as LY-CoV1404 or LY3853113 - works by attaching itself to a place on the virus that has shown few signs of mutating, which means the drug is likely to retain its effectiveness over time, the researchers said in a report posted on Friday on bioRxiv ahead of peer review.

    "New variant-resistant treatments such as LY-CoV1404 are desperately needed, given that some of the existing therapeutic antibodies are less effective or ineffective against certain variants and the impact of variants on vaccine efficacy is still poorly understood," the research team wrote. An AbCellera spokesperson said the company plans to release information about tests of the drug in humans on Tuesday.


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  9. AD1184

    AD1184 Noble

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    The trouble I see with proposed anti-viral (including antibody-based) treatments is that even if they were to work, they would have to be administered really quickly after infection to have any hope of altering the outcome. Doctors will typically wait for a positive diagnosis before administering any treatment for something. It would have to be given as a precaution immediately upon suspicion of Covid-19, and not after, but would that happen in practice? It depends on the risk to the uninfected individual of the medicine, as well as the cost of the treatment.

    The patient will also typically wait a long time before presenting to the hospital with the infection, because the advice given is generally to isolate yourself at home in case you only have a mild illness. Meanwhile, if you are destined to have a severe illness, the virus is rapidly replicating in your body unimpeded by any medical intervention. I also understand that the virus will typically stop replicating in the body (the virus particles will all 'die') fairly early in the course of severe illness.

    Any treatments, then, I suspect are going to be ineffective unless they work on the advanced illness by somehow undoing the damage done by the virus, or working to dampen an overactive immune response.

    There would need to be a change in attitudes, and new advice given to the public, to act fast on Covid, and seek a test and the hypothetical medicine immediately upon noticing symptoms, if it is an anti-viral medicine.
     
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  10. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    23,656
    So Biden won't follow the science indoors as well as outdoors disregarding the CDC by going maskless indoors in the following recent photo and putting the Carters at risk...Hypocrites all of them, sending the wrong message to the people verse what the CDC (science) says...These people are representatives of our country and people, they should be acting more responsibly...

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    Social media erupts as maskless Bidens tower over Carters in 'Wonderland' photo

     
  11. August

    August Metanoia

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  12. JahaRa

    JahaRa Honorable

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    429
    But what are his predispositions? Was he already prone to blod clots? There is no information that indicates the vaccine caused it, yet we are told about every Astra Zeneca and Johnson & Johnson case as if the vaccine is the cause AND we never hear about the people who got blood clots after the other two vaccines and I know they exisit. Think about the narrative the media is selling us, and think about who profits from that.
     
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  13. The shadow

    The shadow The shadow knows!

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  14. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    23,656
    What a moron...

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    Anti-vaxxer records himself stealing a vial of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine to 'investigate' in a laboratory

    A Minnesota man filmed and shared a video of himself that appears to show him stealing a vial of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine from a CVS pharmacy, Newsweek reported. In the video, the man - identified by Newsweek as Thomas Humphrey - records himself saying that he will take the vial to "to the lab" to investigate.



    He later proceeds to claim that the vaccine is "poisoning people" and implies that this was not his first time running off with a dose of the lifesaving jab. In Instagram posts seen by Insider, Humphrey reveals himself to be strongly opposed to vaccinations.

    At the start of the clip, which has been widely shared on social media, Humphrey asks a CVS employee to allow him to read the information on the vial. He can then be seen removing the vial from its box and walking towards the store's exit. "Sir, sir," the alarmed pharmacy worker says.

    "I will be taking my vaccine," Humphrey responds. "We're going to go test this, we're gonna bring it to the lab, we're gonna investigate," he adds. Humphrey then offers to trade his mask for the vial of vaccine and urges employees not to touch him. "This is poisoning people," Humphrey continues. COVID-19 vaccines are, in fact, safe and effective.

    After escaping from the pharmacy, the man records himself celebrating his successful theft. "They didn't even lock the doors on me," he says. He then suggests that this was not his first attempt at stealing a vaccine dose. "I got it again, guys," adding, "Praise the Lord, I've got a full vial this time." The video ends with Humphrey entering his car and acknowledging that the CVS employees would "definitely" call the cops. He was correct.

    Humphrey was arrested, booked, and later released from the Anoka County Sheriff's office with a charge of obstructing an investigation on Thursday, Newsweek reported. Posts from Humphrey's Instagram profile reveal that he is not apologetic. "I didn't do anything wrong, guys," he can be heard saying in a 23-minute-long video.

    In the same video, he goes on to explain why he is vehemently opposed to COVID-19 vaccines. "My mom just died two weeks after taking it," he says. "My friend has ovarian troubles now and people are ... organ failure," Humphrey adds. The anti-vaxxer then proceeds to compare taking the coronavirus vaccine to "choosing to subconsciously commit suicide" and says that he knows "the cure for every disease."

    Another Instagram post, shared on Friday, includes an image of what could be the stolen vial. "We bout to find out what's in these vaccines," Humphrey wrote. "Just overnighted these them to an MD who has his own diagnostic laboratory. He will be taking a few samples out of each vile and sending it off to his friends for them to sample it as well."

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  15. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    CDC acknowledges "repeatedly documented" threat of airborne transmission of COVID-19

    The CDC acknowledged Friday that airborne spread of COVID-19 among people more than 6 feet apart "has been repeatedly documented."

    Why it matters: This is "a change from the agency’s previous position that most infections were acquired through 'close contact, not airborne transmission,'" the N.Y. Times reports.

    The new guidance says airborne transmission is more common when people are close, but:

    The bottom line: Aerosol expert Linsey Marr "pointed out that one updated page on the C.D.C. website, entitled 'How Covid-19 Spreads,' says that inhaling the virus when people are far apart is 'uncommon,'" the Times noted. "The statement is 'misleading and potentially harmful,' Dr. Marr said."

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  16. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    These four COVID-19 vaccines could soon join the pandemic fight

    A couple of years ago, who knew the names of companies such as Moderna and BioNTech would be so widely known? Thanks to their COVID-19 vaccines, they are now. But which other pharmaceutical companies are still likely to join these names, and those of [hotlink]Pfizer[/hotlink], AstraZeneca, and Johnson & Johnson, on the list of the world’s pandemic saviors?

    There are still several firms that hope to introduce COVID-19 vaccines in the near future, and that have a good chance of doing so. Even if richer countries are getting significant supplies today, there’s a lot more of humanity to vaccinate—and possibly new mutations that will need addressing.

    Here’s a rundown of four potentially serious players and what they have to offer.

    CureVac

    Who?

    CureVac is the smallish, two-decade-old German biotech that President Donald Trump reportedly offered $1 billion to exclusively serve the U.S. The political fallout led the European Commission to loan the company €75 million ($90 million), while Germany invested €300 million for a 23% stake. The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has been an investor since 2015. CureVac had a successful Nasdaq IPO in August.

    Vaccine name and type?

    CVnCoV, a messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccine. This is a new kind of vaccine, in which synthesized ribonucleic acid is used to provoke the immune response. It is relatively easy to modify, but its freezing requirements have logistical implications.

    When and where?

    The vaccine could be one of the next to gain European Medicines Agency (EMA) approval, perhaps this or next month. However, CureVac hasn’t yet announced the efficacy of CVnCoV. The company already has a deal with the European Commission to provide up to 405 million doses to the EU’s 27 member states. It also has development agreements with [hotlink]Bayer[/hotlink] and GlaxoSmithKline—and Bayer gets the option to market CVnCoV outside Europe.

    Can it deliver?

    CureVac says it can deliver up to 300 million doses this year, and much more in 2022. Partly using that EU loan, it’s building a factory in its hometown of Tübingen. However, its manufacturing muscle comes from partners. CureVac has agreements with contract manufacturers such as Rentschler Biopharma (for more than 100 million doses a year), [hotlink]Novartis[/hotlink] (for up to 50 million doses this year and up to 200 million in 2022), Wacker Chemie (over 100 million doses a year), and Celonic (more than 100 million doses in total). Its GSK deal should also produce up to 100 million doses this year.

    Novavax

    Who?

    Novavax is based in Gaithersburg, Md. It was founded in 1987, but is only now preparing to launch actual vaccines (also including a flu vaccine called NanoFlu). Before the pandemic, it appeared to be in a downward spiral owing to repeated failures of its vaccine candidates. The company received $1.6 billion from the Trump administration’s Operation Warp Speed and $388 million from the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) to fund its COVID vaccine.

    Vaccine name and type?

    The Novavax COVID-19 vaccine, or NVX-CoV2373, or Covovax in its Indian trials. Novavax calls it a recombinant nanoparticle vaccine, and its production involves infecting moth cells with an insect virus that’s been modified to include the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein gene. The company says the vaccine has an efficacy rate of over 96%.

    When and where?

    Novavax is hoping for imminent approval in the U.S., the U.K., Canada, South Korea and the EU. Its Warp Speed deal should see it deliver 100 million doses in the U.S., while it has a 60 million dose contract in the U.K. and a Canadian deal for up to 76 million doses. Novavax was supposed to sign an EU deal for up to 200 million doses, but according to the European side it’s dragging its heels owing to problems sourcing raw materials. The company will however be supplying 1.45 billion doses to the Covax facility for low- and middle-income countries. It will also sell 40 million doses to South Korea.

    Can it deliver?

    Novavax’s Covax contribution includes 350 million doses that it will make itself, as well as 1.1 billion to be produced by the [hotlink]Serum Institute of India[/hotlink] (SII), the world’s biggest vaccine manufacturer. At full capacity, the SII deal is supposed to pump out more than 2 billion doses a year. Novavax has said its own recently acquired facilities in the Czech Republic will have a capacity of over 1 billion doses annually. It also has manufacturing deals with Fujifilm Diosynth Biotechnologies (FDB) in the U.S. (100 million doses) and in the U.K. (180 million doses annually), Biofabri in Spain (over half a million doses), SK Bioscience in South Korea (40 million doses), and Takeda in Japan (over 250 million doses a year).

    Sanofi and GlaxoSmithKline

    Who?

    Unlike CureVac and Novavax, these two are proper Big Pharma. [hotlink]Sanofi[/hotlink] is a French multinational that’s been around since 1973, though its Sanofi Pasteur vaccine-making unit can trace its heritage back to the great microbiologist Louis Pasteur in the 19th century. GSK (which also has a hand in CureVac’s vaccine) is a British multinational that was born 21 years ago in the merger of Glaxo Wellcome and SmithKline Beecham. The pair got the biggest Operation Warp Speed award to fund their COVID-19 vaccine—$2.1 billion—and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is a codeveloper.

    Vaccine name and type?

    Sanofi-GSK COVID-19 vaccine, or VAT00002. It’s an adjuvanted recombinant protein-based vaccine, essentially a tweaked version of an existing Sanofi flu vaccine that uses a SARS-CoV-2 spike protein rather than an influenza protein, with GSK providing the adjuvant (a component that aims to boost immune response). Sanofi is also working separately with Translate Bio on an mRNA vaccine candidate.

    When and where?

    The Sanofi-GSK vaccine has suffered significant setbacks. Thanks to a dosing miscalculation, clinical trials last year showed insufficient immune responses in older people, leading the companies to begin fresh trials in February. They are now targeting approval in Q4, meaning their vaccine is (if successful by that point) most likely to be used to address emerging COVID variants. Deals already signed include those with the European Commission (up to 300 million doses), the U.S. (an initial 100 million doses with the option for 500 million more), Canada (up to 72 million doses), the U.K. (up to 60 million doses), and the Covax facility (20 million doses).

    Can they deliver?

    Again, these are established Big Pharma firms so, if the vaccine proves effective, sure.

    Valneva

    Who?

    Valneva is a French vaccine specialist that’s all of eight years old. It already sells vaccines against cholera and Japanese encephalitis. This week it announced a share flotation to raise more than $100 million for the development of its COVID vaccine.

    Vaccine name and type?

    Valneva COVID-19 vaccine, or VLA2001. This one’s a traditional inactivated whole virus vaccine, meaning it delivers a killed-off version of the SARS-CoV-2 virus itself into the body in order to stimulate the immune response. The approach could be useful in targeting COVID variants because it doesn’t focus so exclusively on the spike protein where some of the most dangerous mutations occur. Phase I/II trials have shown Valneva’s vaccine to be “generally safe and well tolerated.”

    When and where?

    Valneva is hoping to apply for regulatory approval in the fall, pending successful Phase III trial data. Valneva’s big contract—for up to 190 million doses by 2025—is with the U.K., where its manufacturing is based. Talks with the EU collapsed last month, with the European Commission claiming Valneva didn’t meet “a certain set of conditions.” However, France and some other EU countries are reportedly still keen to buy the firm’s vaccine on a bilateral basis, if it pans out.

    Can it deliver?

    So far, Valneva only has one plant, in Scotland; it’s supposed to pump out 200 million doses a year. The company said in February that it was open to other production partnerships if enough customers materialize.

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  17. JahaRa

    JahaRa Honorable

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    429
    Why wasn't he arrested for theft???? That vial has more than one dose of the vaccine in it.
     
  18. Standingstones

    Standingstones Celestial

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    In India the religious festival called the Khumb Mela was allowed to proceed. In the early months of 2021, 9.1 million people congregated along the banks of the Ganges River. It’s been said that this festival has turned into a super spreader of the Covid virus. Talk about ignorance.
     
  19. pigfarmer

    pigfarmer tall, thin, irritable

    Messages:
    5,093
    I hear people talking about covid related problems months and months after they recovered. No doubt some are real but I believe a lot are psychosomatic or just plain BS. I am thinking of a couple of coworkers who were shambling messes to begin with and now blame all their problems on the virus. Uhhhh, no.

    Sitting at he Buffalo Wild Wings bar every day and/or eating peanut butter cups and Yoo-Hoo for breakfast probably have more to do with feeling poorly than covid.
     
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  20. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    CDC Limits Review of Vaccinated but Infected; Draws Concern

    Federal health officials this month decided to limit how they monitor vaccinated people who have been infected with Covid-19, drawing concern from some scientists who say that may mean missing needed data showing why and how it happens.

    At the end of April, more than 9,000 Americans were reported to be infected after being vaccinated, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. While that’s a tiny percentage of the 95 million people fully inoculated at the time, researchers still want to find out what specific mechanisms may be spurring the infections.

    Rare breakthrough cases are expected since no vaccines are 100% effective. But tracking and sequencing the cases helps in figuring out who may be more at risk, whether new variants evade the vaccines and when protection from the shots begins to wane. At the same time, those infected -- some of whom are suffering widespread medical issues, even if they’re not hospitalized -- say they feel lost as a result of the lack of information.

    “We shouldn’t be narrowing the focus, we should be broadening and develop a systematic plan,” said Eric Topol, director of the Scripps Research Translational Institute in La Jolla.

    At the start of May, the CDC shifted from monitoring all reported breakthroughs to only those that result in hospitalization or death, Tom Clark, head of the vaccine evaluation unit for the CDC’s vaccine task force, said in an interview. The goal of the new strategy, according to the agency: maximize the quality of data collected on cases.

    Total number of breakthrough infections reported to CDC - 9,245

    Females 5,827 (63%)
    People aged 60 and older 4,245 (45%)
    Asymptomatic infections 2,525 (27%)
    Hospitalizations 835 (9%)
    Deaths 132 (1%)

    The CDC says its numbers are probably an undercount, since their surveillance system is passive and relies on voluntary reporting from state health departments that may not be complete.

    The agency shifted its strategy because there’s few worrying patterns in the data collected so far, suggesting the focus should be on the most severe cases, Clark said. He added that the agency has planned other vaccine studies, including one with a network of health centers, to compare disease severity and frequency of variant infections between vaccinated and unvaccinated people.

    (More on the link)

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