Diminishing Quality of Food & Products

nivek

As Above So Below
I keep seeing aluminium soft-drink cans at several local supermarkets that are burst open. Even in multi-can cardboard boxes, there are clearly ones that have been pierced and have spilt their contents everywhere. I remember reading over the pandemic that there was an aluminium shortage threatening the supply of such cans to the drink industry, so I am wondering if they have reduced the amount of material in each can as a cost-saving measure, thus making them more susceptible to being mishandled. Either that, or the amount of mishandling of them itself has seemingly increased recently.
I had an aluminum can of Coca-Cola explode in my car recently...It was a full unopened can that I accidently left in my car during my lunch at work...I came back out to my car 3 hours later on a break and found the can blown open with soda all over the interior of my car...I thought maybe the heat in the car caused this to occur but it also could be that they are also using less aluminum material to produce the cans...

sticky tapes.
The biggest issues I've had with sticky tape is with the masking tape and duct tape types...Most tapes aren't performing as expected and it seems that if I buy any other brand that is not affiliated with 3M products, then the tape doesn't not work well...3M brand does seem to hold up and perform well...

My local supermarket has trolleys where about 40% of them have a flat-spot on one of the front casters so they no longer roll properly. So the tyres of those casters are obviously not up to the job, as whenever one of the wheels gets jammed and cannot turn, a flat spot is immediately worn into the material. Sometimes these sorts of material failures are due to the fact that environmental legislation means that manufacturers can no longer use something that works, and have to choose instead from materials which do not work (think paper straws, although that has largely been a voluntary measure by the fast food industry).
I've noticed the flat spots occur because of the mechanical device used to retrieve the trolleys and run them en masse back to the grocer building...The operator starts and stops (mainly stops) the trolley retrieving device too quickly causing the trolley wheel tread to wear down quickly...Could be that the material used is now inferior and doesn't hold up well either...

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nivek

As Above So Below

The incredible SHRINKING ready meals: How Tesco and Morrisons have slimmed 50g off own-brand dishes while INCREASING their price... as parents count every penny amid cost-of-living crisis

Tesco and Morrisons are latest supermarkets to slim down own-brand dishes while INCREASING

Tesco has cut 50g off the weight of every single one of its own-label ready meals, yet the supermarket has increased the price on some of those items. Research by The Grocer using Assosia data has revealed the brand has changed its 450g and 800g ready meals for 400g and 750g packs respectively - but upped how much the meals cost in a few cases. Meanwhile, Morrisons swapped its range of 450g Indian-inspired curries with rice - such as Chicken Jalfrezi with Basmati Rice, Chicken Korma with Pilau Rice, and Chicken Tikka Masala with Pilau Rice - for 400g packs. And then the supermarket increased the price of these meals from £2.75 to £3.49. This comes amid an ongoing cost-of-living crisis, with the price of everyday essentials like fuel, energy and food soaring. Consequently, families are strapped for cash.

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nivek

As Above So Below

Buy this, not that! As grocery prices soar and Americans seek ways to make ends meet, discover all the alternatives to build healthy, affordable meals

Tips for saving money at the grocery store as inflation surges

As American households face rising costs to cover basic necessities, consumers are seeking out savings on their grocery bills any way they can find them. According to the latest inflation data, the price of groceries rose 12.2 percent nationwide in June from a year ago, the quickest pace since April of 1979. Soaring food prices played a major role in pushing overall inflation to 9.1 percent for the month, a four-decade high.

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nivek

As Above So Below
The WEF is promoting insects as a part of diet from 2030, mandated for all humanity who will be brainwashed and controlled by the Globalist banksters. Here's a study showing that eating insects is a great way to transmit parasites in animals and humans alike.

A parasitological evaluation of edible insects and their role in the transmission of parasitic diseases to humans and animals

Abstract

From 1 January 2018 came into force Regulation (EU) 2015/2238 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 25 November 2015, introducing the concept of “novel foods”, including insects and their parts. One of the most commonly used species of insects are: mealworms (Tenebrio molitor), house crickets (Acheta domesticus), cockroaches (Blattodea) and migratory locusts (Locusta migrans). In this context, the unfathomable issue is the role of edible insects in transmitting parasitic diseases that can cause significant losses in their breeding and may pose a threat to humans and animals. The aim of this study was to identify and evaluate the developmental forms of parasites colonizing edible insects in household farms and pet stores in Central Europe and to determine the potential risk of parasitic infections for humans and animals. The experimental material comprised samples of live insects (imagines) from 300 household farms and pet stores, including 75 mealworm farms, 75 house cricket farms, 75 Madagascar hissing cockroach farms and 75 migrating locust farms. Parasites were detected in 244 (81.33%) out of 300 (100%) examined insect farms. In 206 (68.67%) of the cases, the identified parasites were pathogenic for insects only; in 106 (35.33%) cases, parasites were potentially parasitic for animals; and in 91 (30.33%) cases, parasites were potentially pathogenic for humans. Edible insects are an underestimated reservoir of human and animal parasites. Our research indicates the important role of these insects in the epidemiology of parasites pathogenic to vertebrates. Conducted parasitological examination suggests that edible insects may be the most important parasite vector for domestic insectivorous animals. According to our studies the future research should focus on the need for constant monitoring of studied insect farms for pathogens, thus increasing food and feed safety.

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AD1184

Celestial
The WEF is promoting insects as a part of diet from 2030, mandated for all humanity
Surely only for the plebs. I don't think that the WEF heavyweights, or Bill Gates, who is reportedly investing in insect farming, are going to be incorporating insects into their diet.
 

nivek

As Above So Below
Surely only for the plebs. I don't think that the WEF heavyweights, or Bill Gates, who is reportedly investing in insect farming, are going to be incorporating insects into their diet.

I'll be damned if I eat any of that insect food crap, I will hunt for animal protein if it comes to that in my lifetime...I have hunted deer, rabbit, quail, although I do not care for venison all that much, but have no problem cleaning and eating wild meat...

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nivek

As Above So Below
They are not even telling people about this, they are just adding insect ingredients quietly...Check your foods!...

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What’s that smell? Big Food corporations are quietly adding crickets and other insects into meal bars, cookies and snacks

Be careful when buying “health food” as some corporations have already begun quietly adding cricket “flour” and other insect-based ingredients to products labeled “sustainable” and “nutritious.”

One company called Actually Foods is now selling a Cheddar Cheese Puffs product that contains “organic cricket flour” in the “puff” ingredients list. The product, which comes from Canada, is labeled using the terms “nutritious,” “sustainable,” and “delicious.”

The Cheddar Cheese Puffs product from Actually Foods is also branded as being high in protein because it is “powered by crickets” – the suggestion being that crickets are a “superfood.”

It turns out that Entomo Farms, the parent company of Actually Foods, is on a mission “to make cricket-based foods the first choice for individuals interested in high-quality, sustainable protein.” The company offers an entire line of products with cricket ingredients, including cricket protein powder and whole roasted crickets, both in regular and “organic.”

Exo Protein’s Savory Meal Bar is another food product that contains cricket flour as a protein source. Competitor Snowpiercer likewise offers a “cricket protein bar” that is marketed as a health food product.

(Globalists will gorge on meat while their human slaves are forced to eat bugs)

Another creepy brand called Human Improvement (hi!), the branding of which is reminiscent of the film Soylent Green, offers a cricket protein powder that contains “crazy fiber” and other “unique ingredients.”

The company claims that its insect powder is an “actual whole food” that is great “for muscle” and does not cause bloat. It aims to be a replacement for whey protein from goats and cows.

Then we have Hoppy Planet Foods’ “Chocolate Chirp Cookies,” which are labeled on the front of the package as containing “3x protein” compared to regular chocolate chip cookies.

What is not apparent from the front of the package is the fact that Chocolate Chirp Cookies contain cricket ingredients that are not prominent upon first glance. This is one of the more deceptive brands that appears to be trying to hide cricket ingredients from customers.

Roberts Bakery in the United Kingdom also offers a cricket bread loaf that contains dried, ground-up cricket carcasses in the flour. The result is “a lovely tasty loaf with a crunchy finish.”

As we reported, crickets are also now on the menu at some public schools in Wales, another country that has been co-opted by globalists from the World Economic Forum (WEF), which is behind the cricket push.


(More on the link)

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nivek

As Above So Below
A Dutch city will become the first city in the world to ban the advertising of meat in most public spaces.



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nivek

As Above So Below

Approximately Half of Total Protein Intake by Adults must be Animal-Based to Meet Non-Protein Nutrient-Based Recommendations with Variation Due to Age and Sex

Abstract

Background

Shifting towards a more plant-based diet, as promoted in Western countries, will reduce the animal protein contribution to total proteins. Such a reduction may not only impair protein adequacy, but also the adequacy in other nutrients.

Objectives

We determined, for different adult subpopulations, the minimum total protein level and the minimum animal protein contribution to total proteins that are compatible with the fulfillment of all non-protein nutrient-based recommendations.

Methods

Mean nutritional content and mean diet cost for 5 French subpopulations were estimated using a French cross-sectional representative survey: Women < 50 years (A), Women 50–64 years (B), Women ≥ 65 years (C), Men < 65 years (D), Men ≥ 65 years (E). For each subpopulation, linear programming optimization was used to assess the minimum protein level (Model Set#1) and the minimum animal protein contribution to total proteins (Model Set#2) that are compatible with the fulfilment of all nutrient-based recommendations (except proteins for which levels were analyzed as output). Total diet cost was not allowed to increase. Eating habits were considered in Model Set#2 only.

Results

The minimum amount of protein that was theoretically compatible with the fulfilment of nutrient-based recommendations (Model Set#1) was below the minimum recommended protein intake for all subpopulations except A. In Model Set#2, for women and men over 65 years (C and E), decreasing animal protein contribution to total proteins below 55% and 60% respectively led to protein levels below recommend levels. For the other subpopulations (A, B, and D), the lowest animal protein contribution to total proteins compatible with a nutritionally adequate diet (including protein adequacy) was 55%, 50% and 45%, respectively.

Conclusion

This study provides factual information about the animal protein contribution to total proteins compatible with meeting all nutrient-based recommendations at no additional cost and shows that it varies between 45% and 60% depending on the group of adults considered.

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Standingstones

Celestial
This past Saturday my wife and I went to a local market. I guess I am out of the loop. As I walked past a deli the prices for lunch meat were averaging $10.50 or more. I like apple cider at this time of the year. Unfortunately a gallon was $10.00. No thank you. Granted market prices are higher than the grocery store. I just don’t know how people can do their shopping there.
 

nivek

As Above So Below
People should be revolting against this campaign to promote eating insects...

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Salted ants. Ground crickets. Why you should try edible insects.

(Excerpt)

Farmed insects produce far less greenhouse gas and require much less land and water than conventional livestock. Insects also generate more biomass with less input. Crickets, for example, are 12 times more efficient than cows at converting feed into edible weight.

Already, 2 billion people eat insects, according to one estimate — primarily in parts of Africa, Latin America and Asia. The practice dates back millennia. “I always thought, even back in the ’90s, someday, maybe, [Americans] will do this,” Sanchez says.

The coming years may prove her right. The edible insect industry is ramping up — one report predicts the market will reach $9.6 billion by 2030. Consumers can already find foods like salted ants on Amazon and cricket powder protein bars in Swiss grocery stores. Recent years have seen numerous media stories extolling the virtues of insect-eating.

But before insects can become common fare, more diners must be convinced that six-legged critters are, in fact, food. Through tasting experiments, surveys and educational demos, researchers, entrepreneurs and educators are delving into consumers’ psychology and finding that resistance to insect-eating can be strong.

“Getting over the initial disgust of the idea of eating something that is often thought of as dirty and unclean is a big barrier,” says Matthew Ruby, a lecturer in psychology at La Trobe University in Albury-Wodonga, Australia who has studied this topic.
But researchers are discovering that disgust wanes once people actually taste insects. In a 2022 Spanish study, for example, volunteers felt more positively about pizza topped with mealworms after tasting it. How, then, to get people to take that first bite?

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Dejan Corovic

As above, so bellow
People should be revolting against this campaign to promote eating insects...

...

Salted ants. Ground crickets. Why you should try edible insects.

(Excerpt)

Farmed insects produce far less greenhouse gas and require much less land and water than conventional livestock. Insects also generate more biomass with less input. Crickets, for example, are 12 times more efficient than cows at converting feed into edible weight.

Already, 2 billion people eat insects, according to one estimate — primarily in parts of Africa, Latin America and Asia. The practice dates back millennia. “I always thought, even back in the ’90s, someday, maybe, [Americans] will do this,” Sanchez says.

The coming years may prove her right. The edible insect industry is ramping up — one report predicts the market will reach $9.6 billion by 2030. Consumers can already find foods like salted ants on Amazon and cricket powder protein bars in Swiss grocery stores. Recent years have seen numerous media stories extolling the virtues of insect-eating.

But before insects can become common fare, more diners must be convinced that six-legged critters are, in fact, food. Through tasting experiments, surveys and educational demos, researchers, entrepreneurs and educators are delving into consumers’ psychology and finding that resistance to insect-eating can be strong.

“Getting over the initial disgust of the idea of eating something that is often thought of as dirty and unclean is a big barrier,” says Matthew Ruby, a lecturer in psychology at La Trobe University in Albury-Wodonga, Australia who has studied this topic.
But researchers are discovering that disgust wanes once people actually taste insects. In a 2022 Spanish study, for example, volunteers felt more positively about pizza topped with mealworms after tasting it. How, then, to get people to take that first bite?

.

I wouldn't mind eating muscular tissue of insect, but I have a big problem eating their stomachs. I think its their guts are what is really full of mega contagious germs. But how does one separate muscles from guts, with insects?
 
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