Diminishing Quality of Food & Products

nivek

As Above So Below
That's cheaper than I'm paying, I put 40 dollars in my gas tank at $3.92 a gallon for mid-grade fuel...Unbelievable, it's going to cost me close to a hundred dollars a week just to go to work and back...

q5

Way to go Brandon!...

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nivek

As Above So Below
'Skimpflation' is here: Longer waits, fewer options and bare-bones customer support hide the true price of inflation as businesses slash services in response to rising costs and labor shortage



Americans are already fed up with soaring inflation, but the problem is even worse than official statistics describe due to a sneaky phenomenon dubbed 'skimpflation.' Coined on a recent episode of NPR's Planet Money podcast, skimpflation refers to a cutback in services as businesses struggle to cope with a labor shortage and rising material costs. While it is related to 'shrinkflation', which refers to stealthy reductions in package sizes, the services cutbacks of skimpflation are an even bigger headache for consumers, causing longer waits, fewer options and a general increase in daily inconveniences.

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nivek

As Above So Below
I went to the grocery store this morning and so many empty shelves, more than I've seen in this sleepy small rural town...

All cat food and most of the dog food gone...No bottled water, no bread, cereal isle is half empty, the list goes on...

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nivek

As Above So Below

The shadow

The shadow knows!
Yesterday we got our Thanksgiving meal. We expect up to 9 ppl. I am glad I reserved our turkey. The coolers were empty. The store was moderate stocked. And the cost. $235.00
 

Standingstones

Celestial
We have noticed the lack of certain products or the increase in the cost of grocery items. I enjoy apple cider when it becomes available in September and October. The cost of a gallon of local cider…. $8.00! I can buy a lot of sugar drinks for that price.

Toilet paper was almost sold out at our local WalMart. I hate to be the person buying up T Paper but you have to stock up when you see it available.

Buying cat food has become a chore as well. Luckily our cat only eats dry food. My wife said that the shelves were empty of canned wet food at the grocery store we shop at. WalMart had three total cans on the shelf.

If this is some diabolical scheme to bring the world to a screeching halt, it seems to be working.
 

michael59

Celestial
Our stores don't look like that. Although the food is still diminished in taste and quality. Most stuff that is "fresh" isn't. There isn't even any flavor in the bag of onions I purchased last month. For awhile there, I was thinking that maybe I had caught Omicron because I haven't smoked in over 2 years and yet still nothing has any flavor. Except salt, :huh8: my salt intake has gone down drastically. I can't believe I used to use so much.
 

nivek

As Above So Below
They want us to eat genetically engineered mealworms now!

For centuries, farmers have bred livestock and crops for desirable traits such as faster growth, better taste, and resistance to disease. Now, a new kind of rancher is following in their footsteps: mealworm breeders.

Last week, France-based Ÿnsect announced it will spend nearly $5 million on the world’s first large-scale initiative to use state-of-the-art genetics for breeding beetle larvae and other insects that can be used as animal feed, fertilizer—and even food for people.

“We’re talking about accelerating the ability to use the genomes of millions of insects” for selective breeding, says insect geneticist Christine Picard of Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis, who is not involved in the effort.

The new program, she notes, should help scientists untangle the often complex mix of genes involved in commercially valuable traits such as faster reproduction and more efficient food consumption. “The sheer volume [of genetic information] that they can get through might be able to address that.”

Ÿnsect, founded in 2011, is one of the world’s largest insect ranchers. It operates two “vertical farms”—one in France, the other in the Netherlands—that produce billions of yellow mealworm beetle larvae (Tenebrio molitor) and other insects every year.

The bugs are processed into powders and oils used in pet food, fish and farm feeds, and textured tofulike “meats” for human consumption. The company also sells the shed shells of the growing mealworms as fertilizer.

(More on the link)

 
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