FDA found weedkiller in nearly ALL foods tested and hid the results

Discussion in 'End Times & Conspiracies' started by nivek, Jun 20, 2018.

  1. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    FDA found glyphosate in nearly all foods tested and hid the results

    In an alarming revelation, it has come to light that government scientists at U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have found the weed killer ingredient glyphosate in many popular processed foods. This information was in emails that were obtained through a freedom of information request. (what they did with that ‘intelligence’ is SHOCKING!)

    Glyphosate is perhaps best known as the main ingredient in the Roundup weed killer brand from the Monsanto company. And, the FDA has been testing foods for the presence of herbicides and pesticides including, this highly toxic substance glyphosate for two years – but had not released results.

    Glyphosate has been used in weed killer for the past 40 years

    The leaked information shows that the organization has had trouble finding foods that do NOT contain traces of this harmful chemical. Corn meal, crackers, cereals and many other processed foods all show traces of glyphosate.

    The internal FDA email is dated January 2017 and is a portion of many communications within the organization to determine just how much glyphosate is in our nation’s food supply. It is the first time the FDA has attempted to ascertain the levels and potential risks of glyphosate contamination.

    As you may know, glyphosate has been used for the past 40 years. Yet, the FDA just recently begun testing for it. (not a comforting thought – if you think about their slow reaction time)

    Demand for testing intensified in 2015 following the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classification of glyphosate as a ‘probable human carcinogen.’

    FDA claims pesticide testing was on samples that were “not official”

    Roundup and other pesticide brands are sprayed directly on to many crops such as corn, wheat, oats and soybeans. It is also used on fields before growing season on crops like spinach and almonds.

    While the levels are low, some exceed accepted guidelines, including in corn, where “over tolerance” levels were detected. (The legal limit is 5.0 ppm, and 6.5 ppm was detected.) Of course, the FDA dismissed its findings, along with other information in the email, stating that the foods tested were not “official samples.”

    The FDA says it will be releasing official findings in a report later in 2018 or early 2019. These types of reports are typically released around two to two and a half years after data has been collected.

    In addition to glyphosate, the FDA has also been measuring for herbicide residues 2,4-D and dicamba. There has been an increase in the use of these weed killers on genetically engineered crops.

    And, now, (finally) the FDA says they have expanded testing capacity to assess for these chemicals. How many more people need to be poisoned by these chemicals before government ‘health’ agencies sound the alarm?!

    Action step: Eating organic reduces your glyphosate exposure

    While regulators, agrochemical industry interests and the Monsanto company all claim that traces of these chemicals are ‘perfectly safe,’ many scientists – and the evidence – say quite the opposite. (look up the work of MIT scientist, Stephanie Seneff, PhD)

    Simply put, prolonged dietary exposure to pesticides can harm your health and has been linked to a higher risk of cancer and other chronic disease conditions like, autoimmune disorders. There’s no doubt, it’s the cumulative effect that causes so many problems.

    Monsanto, often called “the most evil corporation” in the United States, has tried to block information regarding glyphosate food residue from being introduced as evidence in a court case regarding its Roundup products and their link with a higher risk of cancer. Fortunately, the San Francisco superior court judge denied has already denied such a motion.

    So, what can you do?

    Avoiding processed foods sold in most supermarkets. Start spending your money on locally grown (chemical free) organic foods. Keep in mind, many local farmers markets don’t necessarily offer “certified organic” foods, but their non-toxic farming practices tend to offer much better produce – at very reasonable prices.

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  2. Mr_Darkness

    Mr_Darkness Adept

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    I use ROUNDUP, GROUNDCLEAR, and other generic glyphosate products all the time on my job. My cousin used it religiously and developed lymphoma... twice. He suggests using extreme protection which I do. Always use gloves when handling the stuff in a spray bottle. It's a necessary evil but proper care prevents cancer.

    2-4 D is also used in everything agricultural I do...

    These are used on the corn which is used to feed the cows you eat. It's used on the cotton you wear. It's used on the corn you eat, the wheat you eat. Everything.
     
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  3. Niku120

    Niku120 Honorable

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    No evil is necessary.
     
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  4. Mr_Darkness

    Mr_Darkness Adept

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    Got to feed the world somehow.
     
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  5. Black Angus

    Black Angus Honorable

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    I use it with caution too.

    I grow a lot of my own food, have a massive kitchen garden, two hothouses. Large orchard and herb gardens.
    I pickle and preserve lots of excess.

    We have this game at the supermarket we play for fun, "tomato's ?" nah got them growing
    Cucumbers ?... nah
    peas ?....
    beans ?

    Pretty much everything on offer we have at home, but its seasonal so we do buy some things.
    And also crops that take lots of space but give a relatively low yield we buy as well.
    The space needed for some crops gives us a better return on more expensive crops.

    I always look at a plot with the supermarket price per kilo in mind. The more expensive crop gets the spot.
    i get more food out of a square meter of soil, if i plant tomato than i do corn in that space.

    And the flavour is better when you grow your own, a lot of the crops taste like they did when i was a kid compared to the supermarket version of the same food.
     
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  6. Black Angus

    Black Angus Honorable

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    I am also a big seed saver, i have a whole full sized fridge in the garage thats devoted to seeds.
    every crop gets a portion placed in a paper bag, labeled and stored in the fridge for the following year.
     
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  7. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    I grow a fair bit of veggies every year too, I still have green beans I canned 10 years ago, opened some a few days ago...This year red potatoes, cucumbers, bibb lettuce, green beans, and three kinds of tomatoes...Next year a small green house is being built and planting blueberry bushes...I drive about 10 miles to a organic blueberry farm, pick your own costs 10 dollars USD for each gallon bucket you pick and fill up...I rotate crops and plant different crops every year with the exception of green beans, I save many seeds too from all the varieties and growing from previous generations...

    The green beans I have, a Kentucky blue pole bean variety, I grow every year and more than I ever could eat and can...I give away bags full to neighbors, family, still with plenty to can and eat fresh...I used to grow corn but I moved further west in North Carolina years ago and corn doesn't grow as well here as it did at my last house...It takes a lot of water and space, I don't eat enough corn to grow it anyway...I can blueberries, green beans, tomatoes, and cucumbers...

    If I could grow rice economically I would love to, I eat rice almost every day...I store a large amount, I will never run out of rice and green beans...lol

    ...
     
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  8. Black Angus

    Black Angus Honorable

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    292
    Yes i store about 80 kilos of rice here at any given time.
    Its a regulated crop here so you cant grow your own.

    I also give a lot of food away, and every year i put out boxes of grapefruit orange lemon lime and some other hybrids like the lemonade variety. And two weeks later we get 3 or 4 jars of marmalade back from some anonymous neighbour with a note of thanks.

    i grow a number of tomato varietys every year, heirlooms and some improved varietys like the apollo F1.
    Cherry tomatos grow like ferals everywhere, but i cultivate the Sweet Solanato, which is grape shapped and small like a cherry tomato, and the tigeralla which is striped, but has a great flavour
    [​IMG]

    Its winter here so while they are still fruiting in the hothouse, i have to hand pollinate them and they slow down despite the hothouse.
    Snow peas and sugar snap peas are the big crop this month, and the globe artichoke is taking off.
     
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  9. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    I didn't know that about rice...I have a weird tomato plant this season, it started growing like a bush and after a severe thunderstorm whipped it around a little its main branches fell to the ground and it looks like a vine plant now laying on other plants and taking up a bunch of space...

    I'm not a huge tomato eater, love a good tomato soup though with grilled cheese and slice of ham... mqpgb.jpg

    Anyway lol, people used to trade me tomatoes for the different veggies I grew in any given season, peppers or whatnot, but in recent years not as many tomato growers so I started planting more...I had blueberry bushes and grape vines in the past, finally getting around to planting blueberries next season and grapes probably in 2 years, they take more preparation...I've got too many other things going on around the house this year...

    In previous years I had a 4 foot square raised garden for potato growing but this year is the second year I'm growing them starting almost a foot into the ground and out into 5 gallon buckets that have the bottom cut out and filled with soil as the plant grew...So now the buckets are completely full and 3 foot high plants out of each of them, 9 buckets with 2 plants in each bucket...When the plant dies off and before it gets cold those bucket should be full of potatoes and a foot into the ground under them...

    ...
     
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  10. Black Angus

    Black Angus Honorable

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    I do grow potatoes as a SHTF prep, but i leave them in ground to just do their thing and i buy what i eat.
    I also put chilli's and zuchini's on top of them and crop those.

    I give a lot of chilli's away as well as chilli jam.
     
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  11. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    Yeah they put out so much, pepper plants do, I grew a single habanero plant last year and it put out so many hot chilis I lost count, gave away most of them...I like to dry them out and crush them for spices, keep one jar with large chunks...I dry blueberries too, use them in place of raisins for baking oatmeal cookies - oatmeal blueberry cookies, sooo good...

    ...
     
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  12. spacecase0

    spacecase0 earth human

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    822
    I also try to grow my own food,
    almost the only way to get clean food
    I just indexed my seeds to update what I had not indexed in the last 4 years
    it is a large deep freezer almost full of seeds.
    so, if there is something you are looking for, tell me, either I have it and can send it to you, or I likely should want it as well...
    growing this now, and it is the fastest producing squash I have ever grown
    Desi Summer Squash | Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds
    will have seeds to send out this fall
    it almost replaces zucchini, its only failing is that it is a bit bitter if not cooked
    peppers do not do well here.
    nights are cold, so, I have been breeding plants that can deal with that.
    have watermelons and black eyed peas (the type I started with is "mississippi silver"),
    grew them many years in a row till they adapted to the cold nights (right up to the frost point)
    I have 6 types of rice that grow here
    working on peanuts as well.
    and I think I have a black night shade that is frost tolerant, have to test the seeds to see if they do what the parent plant did
    many of the projects I have are 5 years long, (the tree projects might be projects that are way longer than a human lives)
    and many people I find can't deal with even a year delay getting seeds, much less the idea of saving seeds for the next year
    what lots of people don't get is that if you start with a seed packet of corn, it will take you 3 years in a row of saving all the seeds you get to get a large enough crop to live on.
    same applies to wheat
    also, I have moved at least every 3 years the first 30 years of my life, (started gardening at 8 years old)
    each new location had its own issues to deal with, and ones that took a year to figure out
    I got good at dealing with new conditions
    so, I am pretty sure that anyone that think they can feed themselves from growing plants that have never done it before are likely about a year off in calculations

    also, growing potatoes can get you great harvests,
    but you have to have a method to get rid of built up bacteria and viruses
    if you don't have that, potatoes can fail on you entirely. (I have had it happen to me)

    I have plans for each kind of gardening
    are you labor limited or land limited ?
    each garden is not the same at all
     
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  13. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    Each year is not the same for me, last year I wasn't labour limited, this year I am so the garden is a little smaller...

    ...
     
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  14. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    I don't grow potatoes every year, I usually skip a couple years...Not a big potato eater either lol...

    ...
     
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  15. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    Does anyone use Sevin spray or dust?...

    ...
     
  16. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    There's a trial going on now linking Roundup to cancer...

    Dying groundskeeper to testify in Roundup cancer trial | Daily Mail Online

    ...
     
  17. Shadowprophet

    Shadowprophet Truthiness

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    2,614
    I believe this claim, Lately, everything I've eaten has tasted chemical heavy, Even the water. I thought. Maybe it's because I've been sick. But. Even though I tend to be paranoid. It's not unheard of for a government to poison it's people, It's happened before. :(
     
  18. Shadowprophet

    Shadowprophet Truthiness

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    2,614
    I've used Sevin Dust before in the past. I used to grow gardens before I moved to my current home. I am not certain, But I've not seen sevin dust in a long time, I thought they stopped making it.
     
  19. Mr_Darkness

    Mr_Darkness Adept

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  20. Castle-Yankee54

    Castle-Yankee54 Celestial

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    4,532
    2,4-D was used in Agent Orange and a couple other rainbow agents.
     
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