Food Crisis

Discussion in 'Present & Current Events' started by Toroid, May 18, 2019.

  1. August

    August Metanoia

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    Yep bananas here were $3 a kilo now they are $13 a kilo. The rest will follow.
     
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  2. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    So much waste, unbelievable...

    ...

    Food Loss and Waste

    In the United States, food waste is estimated at between 30–40 percent of the food supply. This figure, based on estimates from USDA’s Economic Research Service of 31 percent food loss at the retail and consumer levels, corresponded to approximately 133 billion pounds and $161 billion worth of food in 2010. Wasted food is the single largest category of material placed in municipal landfills and represents nourishment that could have helped feed families in need.

    Additionally, water, energy, and labor used to produce wasted food could have been employed for other purposes. Effectively reducing food waste will require cooperation among federal, state, tribal and local governments, faith-based institutions, environmental organizations, communities, and the entire supply chain.

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) signed a joint agency formal agreement under the Winning on Reducing Food Waste Initiative. The agreement is aimed at improving coordination and communication across federal agencies attempting to better educate Americans on the impacts and importance of reducing food loss and waste.

    As part of the Winning on Reducing Food Waste Initiative, the USDA, EPA and FDA issued its FY2019-2020 Federal Interagency Strategy in April 2019. The Interagency Strategy identifies six priority areas on which the agencies will focus their efforts to reduce food loss and waste in the US.; The priority areas highlight the importance that collaboration between government agencies and the engagement of leaders in the public, private and non-profit organizations will play in solving this problem.

    The full strategy, along with outcomes for each priority area, is available on EPA's website.

    (More on the link)

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  3. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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  4. JahaRa

    JahaRa Noble

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  5. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    We sampled tap water across the US – and found arsenic, lead and toxic chemicals

    In Connecticut, a condo had lead in its drinking water at levels more than double what the federal government deems acceptable. At a church in North Carolina, the water was contaminated with extremely high levels of potentially toxic PFAS chemicals (a group of compounds found in hundreds of household products). The water flowing into a Texas home had both – and concerning amounts of arsenic too.

    All three were among locations that had water tested as part of a nine-month investigation by Consumer Reports (CR) and the Guardian into the US’s drinking water.


    Since the passage of the Clean Water Act in 1972, access to safe water for all Americans has been a US government goal. Yet millions of people continue to face serious water quality problems because of contamination, deteriorating infrastructure, and inadequate treatment at water plants.

    CR and the Guardian selected 120 people from around the US, out of a pool of more than 6,000 volunteers, to test for arsenic, lead, PFAS (per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances), and other contaminants. The samples came from water systems that together service more than 19 million people.

    A total of 118 of the 120 samples had concerning levels of PFAS or arsenic above CR’s recommended maximum, or detectable amounts of lead. Testing of the samples showed:

    • More than 35% of the samples had PFAS, potentially toxic “forever chemicals”, at levels above CR’s recommended maximum.
    • About 8% of samples had arsenic, at levels above CR’s recommended maximum.
    • In total, 118 out of 120 samples had detectable levels of lead.
    The study has some limitations: the quality of the water at one location on a single day doesn’t necessarily reflect the quality of the water supplied by an entire system or at other times. But the ambitious undertaking, with community water systems chosen by CR’s statisticians from a representative mix of systems across the country, provides a unique view into some of the most significant challenges in America’s ongoing drinking water crisis.

    (More on the link)

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  6. JahaRa

    JahaRa Noble

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    This is concerning. I filter my drinking and cooking water because I don't trust it but the city reports that their water is acceptable.
     
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  7. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    I've been filtering my water too, I don't trust county water...I wish I had a well, a friend of mine who lives one county over from me has a well and his water tastes sooo good and fresh, I told him he should get it tested and I can get the county water tested so we can compare...

    ...
     
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  8. JahaRa

    JahaRa Noble

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    902
    I think home depot does free testing, probably because they want to sell water softeners. But I don't think there is an obligation to listen to a sales pitch.
     
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  9. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    There's a place a few miles away from my house that has a sign saying they test water free...I need to drive there and see who it is, I think its a business that sells water filters and purifiers, not sure...When I go out to town later today I'll stop by and see who it is...

    The closest Home Depot to me is almost an hour drive away however there's a Lowes Home Improvement in town close by...

    ...
     
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  10. JahaRa

    JahaRa Noble

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    I think most counties will test water too. Especially well water.
     
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  11. karl 12

    karl 12 Noble

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    When it comes to unelected groups imposing their control by the direct possession and manipulation of all the world's resources then there's a very relevant vid below about 'food'.

    Lots of mealy mouthed public relations speak but apparently the assault on the world's food supply does involve some extremely disturbing aspects - the usual suspects involved including the Trilateral Commission's 'Brookings Institute'.






    Also an extremely disturbing merger with these two groups a while back which now control a quarter of the world’s food supply - especially when one considers their historical background.




    Sources
     
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  12. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    There's also a concerted effort by Monsanto to control the type and patents of seeds used to grow our food, even trying to control the seeds people purchase for their small gardens...

    Monsanto's Control of the Seed Industry | Planet Natural

    I purchase and grow only natural non GMO seed varieties, usually I don't grow hybrids but sometimes depending on what it is, I also grow rare and heirloom varieties of seed from the site below and I purchase some seed locally as long as it's non GMO...

    Rare Heirloom Seeds| Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds

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  13. JahaRa

    JahaRa Noble

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    My friend is a biologist and plant pathologist and she only buys seeds from the heirloom sources. She gave me some of her seeds this year.
     
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  14. spacecase0

    spacecase0 earth human

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  15. karl 12

    karl 12 Noble

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    Also looks like there's a concerted effort by Monsanto to control the exposure of information.

    Let's hope we all don't get 'trolled by third party proxies'.





    Cheers.
     
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  16. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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  17. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    Screenshot_20210412-193353.jpg

    Global Food Costs Keep Climbing in Threat to Consumer Wallets

    (Bloomberg) -- The global food-price rally that’s stoking inflation worries and hitting consumers around the world shows little sign of slowing.

    Even with grain prices taking a breather on good crop prospects, a United Nations gauge of global food costs rose for a 10th month in March to the highest since 2014. Last month’s advance was driven by a surge in vegetable oils amid stronger demand and tight inventories, according to Abdolreza Abbassian, a senior economist at the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization.

    Food prices are in the longest rally in more than a decade amid China’s crop-buying spree and tightening supplies of many staple products, threatening faster inflation. That’s particularly pronounced in some of the poorest countries dependent on imports, which have limited social safety nets and purchasing power and are struggling with the Covid-19 pandemic.

    Breakdown of last month’s food costs:

    The FAO’s food price index rose 2.1% from February.Vegetable oil prices jumped 8% to the highest since June 2011.Meat and dairy costs rose, boosted by Asian demand.Grains and sugar prices fell.

    Grains prices recently climbed to multiyear highs as China imports massive amounts to feed its hog herds that are recovering from a deadly virus. Still, there are signs that tight supplies may get some relief from upcoming wheat harvests in the Northern Hemisphere.

    “Generally speaking, supplies for now are adequate,” Abbassian said. “We might have reached a level whereby from now on even if we see price increases, they may be a bit more subtle” than advances seen in previous months, he said.


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  18. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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  19. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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  20. Sheltie

    Sheltie good to the last drop

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    This is very disturbing and it seems like, for whatever reason, there is little coverage in the media of the rising supermarket prices. I have friends who own restaurants who tell me the prices they pay for food are getting close to being out of reach yet the only thing we hear about in the news is the effects of the quarantine and the labor shortage.

    What disturbs me even more, however, is the rising cost of housing where I live. The average rent for a one-bedroom apartment here just his $1,100 a month. Nearly half of all houses sell for more than the asking price. S0me say we are in another housing bubble and that prices will start coming down, but they're totally wrong. Builders cut back on the number of units produced after the 2008 crash. There is a dramatic shortage of newly constructed homes available and it will take years for builders to catch up with demand. On top of that, it will be extremely challenging to build new homes as the cost of labor and materials has dramatically increased. A truly scary scenario.
     
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