Intelligent alien life: astronomy, astrobiology, and the age of inhabitable worlds

Discussion in 'UFOs & Sightings' started by Thomas R. Morrison, Jun 6, 2018.

  1. Thomas R. Morrison

    Thomas R. Morrison Honorable

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    That's crazy talk. Sorry.

    From where I'm sitting the idea that the entire universe was created as a backdrop so that a bunch of silly hairless apes could have a nice view in the night sky, is just an expression of the outlandishly bloated ego of the human species, which is apparently infinite in some cases.

    Mars had rivers and oceans and now it has polar ice caps and ice trapped in the ground. The asteroid belt and comets are also chock full of ice. There's a liquid ocean of water covering Enceladus, a moon of Saturn. Water is basically everywhere. So we can expect to find liquid water; rivers, oceans, etc., on most planets orbiting their parent stars in the Goldilocks Zone, and many moons inside and outside of the Goldilocks Zone as well.

    And yet actual biologists have found otherwise - did you read the article I linked about this?

    Maybe. Do you have any credible citations to support this argument?

    In any case, carbon is common, and clearly well-suited for life to exist within the Goldilocks Zone. So even if you're right about silicon life (which I doubt, honestly), then we're still left with a universe that's most likely teeming with life, and that life will be on average 3 billion years ahead of us on the evolutionary spectrum.

    Consider how far life has come in the last 3 billion years on Earth. Trilobites first appeared about half a billion years ago. 3 billion years ago the only life on this planet consisted of single-celled organisms like bacteria. So we're apparently in a position akin to bacteria, compared to the average alien civilization in this universe.
     
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  2. CasualBystander

    CasualBystander Celestial

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    More stuff and nonsense.

    Mars was dead about 2 billion years before life formed on earth.

    Life - or life as we know - exists in a very narrow temperature range.

    The lack of energy to the Jupiter moons wouldn't support complex life.

    I'm dubious we will even find even simple life - anywhere.

    Any life we might find will be from debris blown off of earth.
     
  3. humanoidlord

    humanoidlord ce3 researcher

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    or stars are just holograms, and we are the only real solar system
     
  4. Thomas R. Morrison

    Thomas R. Morrison Honorable

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    Yes it's called the Goldilocks Zone. 22% of all the stars in the universe have an earth-like planet in the Goldilocks Zone, which is also known as the habitable zone.

    We were talking about a moon of Saturn, but regardless, you're just guessing. The tectonic energy of Enceladus is enormous - intense enough to keep the oceans underneath the surface liquid. Who's to say that in another few billion years life won't arise there - who knows? It could have single-celled organisms right now.

    Yeah well that's an indefensible position now. Even the most hardened skeptics have been forced to face the enormous odds that life is common in the universe. So now they're stuck in the awkward position of admitting that life is probably out there, if not incredibly common...while maintaining that intelligent life will be rare for some unspecified reason. Apparently there's still some weird taboo against talking about intelligent alien life, even though the numbers and the data are pointing definitively in that direction.

    Look - everyone wants to feel special. But with these numbers and what we know scientifically today, odds are that we're among the least impressive forms of life in this universe...not the crown jewel of God's creation.

    Ok this is getting depressing. Y'all have a pleasant day.
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2018
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  5. 3FEL9

    3FEL9 Islander

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    Awesome! You discovered the meaning of life ? What is it ?
     
  6. humanoidlord

    humanoidlord ce3 researcher

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    you forgot to answer my yesterday answers to your post.....
     
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  7. 3FEL9

    3FEL9 Islander

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    Don't let other ppls personal views weigh you down. shake it off and return stronger than before.
     
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  8. CasualBystander

    CasualBystander Celestial

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    Trick question.

    Wasn't either.

    If you assume planets formed by size Jupiter was first.

    But the accretion disk took a long time to sort itself out.


    Earth is not only the largest rocky planet it has the largest moon other than three Jupiter moons and 1 Saturn moon. The Moon is larger than Pluto and the other Kuiper belt objects.

    The Moon also makes Earth work differently than other worlds. No other planet is going to have significant tides.
     
  9. CasualBystander

    CasualBystander Celestial

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    Not aware of any "Goldilocks" planet that has been found that could support life - at least Earth style life.

    Almost all of their "Goldilocks" planets are so close to the envelope of a red dwarf they would get scrubbed by CMEs periodically.

    Proxima recently had a CME so strong it was visible. Any "Goldilocks" planet around Proxima would get toasted.


    There might be a couple of thousand planets in the galaxy that could support life. About 500 LY between habitable planets.

    Some gas giants might have life - but a gaseous creature has no reason or ability to create tools.

    The other point is we just made it. If humans hadn't emerged the planet would be back to bacteria within 50 million years.
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2018
  10. 3FEL9

    3FEL9 Islander

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    Do intelligent alien life use a0009 or other units of gratification ? To drive their evolution forward.
     
  11. CasualBystander

    CasualBystander Celestial

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    Generally they use a stick.

    As a side note: if humans consisted of just men or just women we would still be living in caves.

    But the men would have more beer.

    And the women's caves would be attractively decorated and landscaped.
     
  12. 3FEL9

    3FEL9 Islander

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    Not sure the human way is universal throughout the universe. Alien males could be very feminine nd females very male, with some species.

    But I agree on the stick.. Everyone out there know how it (that) works.
     
  13. CasualBystander

    CasualBystander Celestial

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    Most intelligent life is probably on gas giants - but without hands they aren't going anywhere.
     
  14. Thomas R. Morrison

    Thomas R. Morrison Honorable

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    I didn’t forget to respond to those points, but I thought it would be unproductive to simply say “I disagree with all of those points.” If there’s a specific point that you’d care to debate, just let me know.

    You’re mistaking “planets that can readily be detected with our limited level of technology,” with “what our findings mean.”

    Due to the limited sensitivity of our technology, we can only directly detect planets orbiting close to their parent stars, and occasionally see planets when they transit in front of their parent star when the orbital plane is oriented just right from our position to see that happen. It requires a careful analysis to interpret these factors to produce a clear view of the prevalence and distribution of planets in the cosmos. This has been done.

    A widely cited study of the results of the Kepler mission’s findings came out in 2013, which found:

    “A team of planet hunters estimates that about 22 percent of the sun-like stars in our galaxy may have planets about the size of Earth that are bathed in similar amounts of sunlight — and potentially habitable.”
    Article: Galaxy Quest: Just How Many Earth-Like Planets Are Out There?

    Here’s the paper:
    https://arxiv.org/pdf/1311.6806.pdf

    The lead author refined that analysis and published a more extensive paper in 2015, which stated:

    “Earth-size planets are common in the Kepler field. If the stars in the Kepler field are representative of stars in the solar neighborhood, then Earth-size planets are common around nearby Sun-like stars. If one were to adopt a 22% occurrence rate of Earth-size planets in habitable zones of Sun-like stars, then the nearest such planet is expected to orbit a star that is less than 12 light-years from Earth and can be seen by the unaided eye.”
    https://arxiv.org/pdf/1510.03902.pdf

    That’s an absurd and indefensible statement. Obviously complex organic life doesn’t require the presence of humanity or the fossil record wouldn’t be chock full of large animals going back long before the first human ancestors appeared on Earth.

    In fact quite the opposite appears to be true – we’re now in the midst of a sixth mass extinction event that we humans have created on this planet:
    Earth's sixth mass extinction event under way, scientists warn

    Haha, you might be right about that. Sometimes I wonder if humanity is actually composed of the female species, engaged in a symbiotic relationship with a lower life form, the male species, which is required for procreation purposes.

    You’re just making stuff up here.
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2018
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  15. humanoidlord

    humanoidlord ce3 researcher

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    wich one has the most interesting answer?
     
  16. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    Fixed that for you...:Whistle::D:cool8:

    ...
     
  17. humanoidlord

    humanoidlord ce3 researcher

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    not really what u am trying to say
    i just wanto to see the most interesting answer
     
  18. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    Are we looking for earth-like planets only in systems with a star like our sun?...Has there been any determinations, theories or research into whether or not systems of planets with non-sunlike stars can harbour life?...

    ...
     
  19. Thomas R. Morrison

    Thomas R. Morrison Honorable

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    You’re doing mental gymnastics in order to force the data to conform to your idea. That’s literally the opposite of analytical reasoning.

    I’ve heard the interviews with both radar operators now, and they've been in touch with radar operators who tracked the objects as they dropped down from space to 80,000ft in altitude. The radar operators who have come forward saw the objects drop from 80,000ft to 28,000ft. And when the objects were approached, they would drop down to 50ft above the surface of the ocean in .78 second (that’s over 24,000mph). Then they would hop back up to 28,000ft and keep going at only 100 knots.

    You should hear what this guy has to say:



    Trying to understand the motives of an alien species is a fool’s errand, but there are a gazillion possible logical explanations. For example, biomedical technology – every independent planetary ecosphere will evolve different biological mechanisms which may be very useful.

    So you’re saying “it’s magic,” but you’re just using different words.
     
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2018
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  20. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    The most interesting answers to our research and experiences individually and as a whole can lead to more questions and/or it will also have an effect on the individual, the lightning bolt that one may need to reach the plateau of understanding desired...

    ...
     

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