Mars

Discussion in 'Science, Tech, & Space Exploration' started by Toroid, Jul 21, 2018.

  1. CasualBystander

    CasualBystander Celestial

    Messages:
    2,213
    On looking at the picture there is a solid horizon line segment that looks like an image artifact.

    Not sure what is happening there but the fame rate (assuming they were in video mode) is 10 FPS black and white and 4 FPS color.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  2. Toroid

    Toroid Founding Member

    Messages:
    5,534
    I tried Google's reverse image search and they were all C2C. On that site is the link to NASA.
    https://alienexpanse.com/index.php?attachments/232nmuanbn-jpg.7377/ - Google Search
     
  3. CasualBystander

    CasualBystander Celestial

    Messages:
    2,213
    • Like Like x 1
  4. humanoidlord

    humanoidlord ce3 researcher

    Messages:
    4,329
    i think its a cosmic ray hit on the camera, many of those
     
  5. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

    Messages:
    13,805
    Lol that's funny!...

    ...
     
  6. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

    Messages:
    13,805
    HiRISE Spots Curiosity Rover at Mars' 'Woodland Bay'

    [​IMG]

    A dramatic Martian landscape can be seen in a new image taken from space, showing NASA's Curiosity rover examining a location called "Woodland Bay." It's just one of many stops the rover has made in an area referred to as the "clay-bearing unit" on the side of Mount Sharp, a 3-mile-tall (5-kilometer-tall) mountain inside of Gale Crater.

    The image was taken on May 31, 2019, by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera aboard NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). In the image, Curiosity appears as a bluish speck. Vera Rubin Ridge cuts across the scene north of the rover, while a dark patch of sand lies to the northeast.

    Look carefully at the inset image, and you can make out what it is likely Curiosity's "head," technically known as the remote sensing mast. A bright spot appears in the upper-left corner of the rover. At the time this image was acquired, the rover was facing 65 degrees counterclockwise from north, which would put the mast in about the right location to produce this bright spot.

    Mirror-like reflections off smooth surfaces show up as especially bright spots in HiRISE images. For the camera to see these reflections on the rover, the Sun and MRO need to be in just the right locations. This enhanced-color image of Curiosity shows three or four distinct bright spots that are likely such reflections.

    The University of Arizona in Tucson operates HiRISE, which was built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. in Boulder, Colorado. JPL, a division of Caltech in Pasadena, California, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Project for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington.


    .
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  7. humanoidlord

    humanoidlord ce3 researcher

    Messages:
    4,329
    well...
     

Share This Page