Metamaterials Not Housed In Vegas Claims Bigelow Managers

Discussion in 'UFOs & Sightings' started by nivek, Dec 18, 2018.

  1. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    Metamaterials Not Housed In Vegas Claims Bigelow Managers

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    In the fast paced, ever evolving, greater picture of AATIP, AAWSAP, Bigelow Aerospace, Bigelow Aerospace Advanced Space Systems (BAASS) and related stories, it’s easy for important statements, documents and information to slip through the cracks.

    Despite an amazing and historic article that forever changed what some say is “the biggest story of the Millennia,” The NY Times seems to have included claims that we now know may be inaccurate, not the whole picture, or at the least… contested.

    Some of the UFO community’s top analysts still quote the original New York Times article without mentioning all relevant information and updates.

    On December 16th, 2017, the New York Times reported:
    On October 31st, 2018, Denise Valdez of KLAS TV Las Vegas added a shocking addendum at the end of George Knapp’s report. Ms. Valdez said:


    It’s important to note that stories evolve and facts come to light over time. Follow up articles and updates can be valuable. Even KLAS published a story about the materials’ Las Vegas connection, citing The NY Times on February 20th, 2018, before it’s Halloween update months later. I support Bigelow Aerospace and consider Robert Bigelow to be a hero. With that said, I have to at least wonder: Is Bigelow Aerospace (previously BAASS) running damage control after The Times’ article caused problems? Or did The NY Times incorrectly state materials were held in Las Vegas? Maybe the metamaterials were simply just not housed in Las Vegas, but then where were they stored?

    Postscript:

    There are limitless locations alleged exotic materials could have been housed. The main location the public has been informed about is EarthTech International. In this video, EarthTech’s Dr. Hal Puthoff is seen filing TTSA’s materials slated for testing, and in this clip he is speaking about them. Bigelow, BAASS and NIDS (and TTSA) have been linked to EarthTech, as well as shared contracts and employees. We also know there are other companies and labs that study materials and do similar work, like Hathaway Research International.
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  2. Dejan Corovic

    Dejan Corovic Honorable

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    Meta-materials are highly relevant to UFOs. There are all possible signs that UFO hulls are made of meta-materials.

    Here is, fresh from the press, a new method of 'shrinking' objects just invented by MIT. Basically they stretch substrate, than they print on it with desired material, be it metal, semiconductor, DNA etc. and than they let substrate shrink, up to 1,000 times, et voila, they can shrink objects down to nano-scale, just right for meta-materials:

    Team invents method to shrink objects to the nanoscale

    It came much faster than I thought, I was thinking meta-materials are due in 300 years, when we'll print them atom by atom. This technique makes them feasible today :)
     
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  3. Dean

    Dean Adept Dabbler

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    On December 12, 2018, To The Stars Academy conducted a 30-minute telephonic "annual stockholders meeting." During this event, several senior staff members gave brief presentations, including Steve Justice, who was introduced as "our chief operations officer and head of our Aerospace Division."

    Justice stated, in part: "We've also accomplished stand up of the ADAM Research Project, to analyze and advance our understanding of the collected exotic materials. Two of the specific tests we're performing on the materials are x-ray fluorescence, where we look for unusual element presence and unusual alloys or combinations of metals, as well as isotope testing, where we're looking for unusual versions of element atomic structures that indicate terrestrial or non-terrestrial origins. While the x-ray fluorescence test is relatively quick-turn, the isotope testing is really expensive and time consuming. It requires really sophisticated equipment and test procedures. As part of the analysis effort, we issued a materials analysis subcontract, and have data collection and analysis both internal to the To The Stars Academy and at an independent laboratory."

    A minute later, he said, "We're in the very first steps of the scientific process, the collecting and analyzing of data. And I gotta tell ya, the process is really time consuming, and costly. And in some cases we're using independent labs where we must fit into their existing workload."
     
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  4. APIGuy

    APIGuy Independent Field Investigator

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    Interesting. Source?

    Chris Cosgwell recently presented a pricing schedule from a well known lab showing that isotopic analysis is not so expensive.
     
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  5. Dean

    Dean Adept Dabbler

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    Interesting. Source?

    The "stockholder meeting" call was open to any stockholder (there are about 2,500) by pre-registration, and was preceded by an advisory that the call "may be recorded." The session was tightly scripted -- I think rather little was said that was not already in the public domain (that is not a criticism, just an observation). I transcribed a few passages that were of interest to me. Stockholders listening in by phone had no opportunity for active interaction with the staff members, although there was pro-forma electronic voting on a slate of directors and on a bylaw revision or two. Participants were invited to submit questions in advance by webform, but only about four questions were used.
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2018
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  6. Thomas R. Morrison

    Thomas R. Morrison Unapologetic Rationalist & Grand Regent of Taraka

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    Interesting. Source?
     
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  7. APIGuy

    APIGuy Independent Field Investigator

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    It was a Facebook comment. Chris comments often on posts in Ryan Sprague's FB group.
     
  8. Thomas R. Morrison

    Thomas R. Morrison Unapologetic Rationalist & Grand Regent of Taraka

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    Thanks but that didn't help: I went to Ryan's FB page Somewhere in the Skies and checked every comment made in the last 2 years and Chris Cogswell's name never shows up:

    Somewhere in the Skies

    Do you remember roughly how much isotopic analysis costs? People have different definitions of "expensive."
     
  9. APIGuy

    APIGuy Independent Field Investigator

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    Hmm. I would agree that it's not there. Anyway, the quotes were in the hundreds of dollars, depending on the type of analysis.
     
  10. APIGuy

    APIGuy Independent Field Investigator

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  11. Thomas R. Morrison

    Thomas R. Morrison Unapologetic Rationalist & Grand Regent of Taraka

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    Thanks - yeah that's much less than I would've expected.

    Okay so those all look like standardized industrial tests for the isotopic ratios of a small range of organic elements; I don't see anything there for metals, for example. I wonder if each element in a composite material would have to be isolated first, and then subjected to an isotopic analysis. I read an article that Chris Cogswell wrote about this earlier this year, but it didn't get into that level of procedural specificity or the associated costs. It would be awesome if he wrote something like that; I'd love to know more.

    Basically what I think you'd want to arrive at, with a complex composite material like a photonic metamaterial (as an example, since it's been mentioned a lot), is a clear model of the material's composition and structure right down to the nuclear level. Especially if it has a crystalline structure rather than a typical amorphous one.

    The LMH sample is said to have 28 layers, alternating between bismuth layers the width of a human hair (~75 microns) to about ten times that thickness for the magnesium layers. I just can't see how modeling the structure of that material down to isotopic precision is going to be cheap or easy. I mean, if specific isotopes are located at specific locations in a 3D lattice, then how can you determine that without destroying the underlying architecture in the process?

    I bet it would have to be done analytically, based on the results of all the different tests of composition and macro structure - and even then the results would be a "best guess" scenario.

    I don't think we could even guess at the other aspect of all this - testing the whole range of physical properties. The potential range of characteristics is just mind-boggling to consider; beyond the obvious electrical characteristics, there could be aspects pertaining to phononics, spintronics, and a dizzying range of quasiparticle interactions - not to mention the possibility of entirely unknown effects. If you actually luck out an get hold of a piece of technology that's ahead of our own, figuring out how it works would probably be like sending an iPhone back in time to Aristotle and seeing how much he can figure out about it.
     
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  12. Dean

    Dean Adept Dabbler

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    Attached, "A Preliminary Catalogue of Alleged 'Fragments' Reportedly Associated with Sightings of Unidentified Aerial Phenomena Where Analysis(es) Was/Were Conducted," compiled by Keith Basterfield, version 2.3, November 28, 2018.

    I only encountered this document today. I pass it on here because of its pertinence to the general topic of the thread, without any attempt to evaluate the quality of the research.
     

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  13. Thomas R. Morrison

    Thomas R. Morrison Unapologetic Rationalist & Grand Regent of Taraka

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    Thanks - I hadn't seen the updated version of this.

    And Keith kindly gave me a shout-out at the end of this document for pointing him to a Jacques Vallée interview where he discussed an isotopic ratio anomaly:

    ADDENDUM 2:
    The following is an extract from a talk by Jacques Vallée. 1min 26secs. Speaking of
    reengineered materials. “For example, there is an element that has five isotopes,
    known isotopes, in different abundance. In the sample we have, two of the isotopes
    are not present, and the other three are present at 33%; 33%; 33%. The only
    thing that can happen is if somebody has separated the isotopes and reintroduced
    them into an alloy for some reason that we can’t fathom what that reason would
    be…Not ready to publish yet…we need to redo it…”

    (Source: Thomas R Morrison pointed me to [timestamped YouTube link]
    which is episode 241 “Grimerica Talks Ufology for the 21st Century” with Dr Jacques
    Vallée. Uploaded 15 September 2017.)


    For anyone interested in this, there are ten elements that have five stable isotopes:

    neodymium
    samarium
    calcium
    selenium
    krypton
    hafnium
    platinum
    titanium
    nickel
    zinc
     
    Last edited: Dec 19, 2018
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  14. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    Interesting that selenium is in that group since selenium exists in several allotropic forms, which I believe is the only one in that list...

    ...
     
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  15. Dean

    Dean Adept Dabbler

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    Additional statements by Steve Justice during the December 12, 2018 TTSA telephonic "annual stockholders meeting":

    STEVE JUSTICE: In our aerospace division, we've completed detailed business plans for multiple projects and business scenarios. For example, we've issued a contract to develop the detailed plans for the beamed-energy launch system, that has the objective of launching cube-sats into orbit at about 10 percent of the cost of current launch methods. We're also continuing our discussions with multiple offices in the Department of Defense regarding collaboration on all of our programs. We recognize that this is a relatively slow process, but we're optimistic, and given the increase in requests for briefings that we've seen lately. We've made a lot of progress despite our limited resources, and we look forward to just tremendously expanding our work in 2019.​

    [And this, in response to a pre-submitted question:]

    STEVE JUSTICE: As I've said in the past, we're committed to responsible disclosure of information. So, the only real answer I can give at this time, as unsatisfying as it is, is we'll release information when the time is right.

    We're in the very first steps of the scientific process, the collecting and analyzing of data. And I gotta tell ya, the process is really time consuming, and costly. And in some cases we're using independent labs where we must fit into their existing workload. In addition, with the limited resources, we have to prioritize exactly what we do work on and what we don't. We just don't have enough funding to do everything we want to do.

    And as we collect results, we've gotta consider several factors. Do we have the right to release information? -- because some of our agreements constrain our ability to release data. Do we have enough context to make disclosure informative and not misleading? And has the information been fully vetted to reduce unintended consequences of release, because we can't afford to release incomplete information, because that can be misleading. Will releasing information harm an actual or potential beneficial relationship? We're working with several groups right now, and we gotta be sensitive to their needs and constraints, not just ours.

    Unfortunately, because of these constraints and uncertainties, we can't commit to a release schedule. Know that we want to release products that are substantiated by fact, not by speculation. We're committed to transparency, but we've gotta balance our goals in the context of both the short and long-term interests of the company.

    [end quotations from Steve Justice]​
     
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  16. Dejan Corovic

    Dejan Corovic Honorable

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    Sounds like they got money from stakeholders to gather and eventually release UFO related information. Now that they got the money, they are not releasing the UFO information, but angling for defense contracts in government as if the money was purely their own. And they are off onto sideline activities like launching cubesats, which was not, I guess, in original deeds.

    What's next, hamburger stand?
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2018
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  17. Dean

    Dean Adept Dabbler

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    Sounds like they got money from stakeholders to gather and eventually release UFO related information. Now that they got the money, they are not releasing the UFO information, but angling for defense contracts in government as if the money was purely their own. And they are off onto sideline activities like launching cubesats, which was not, I guess, in original deeds. What's next, hamburger stand?

    I respectfully disagree. I think if you look through the original promotional materials issued by TTSA when it was launched, they expressed broadly worded ambitions in a number of different fields. For example, under "Aerospace" they explicitly highlighted "beamed energy launch systems," which is apparently what they are pursuing with respect to cubesats. TTSA certainly was not presented as only a UFO-related venture. Also, TTSA made no secret of their hope to eventually be a profitable venture.

    However, in reference to TTSA's UFO-related activities: On December 14, 2018, KLAS TV, the CBS affiliate in Las Vegas, broadcast a report based on a recent interview with TTSA's Luis Elizondo, conducted by veteran correspondent George Knapp. Also posted on the KLAS website is a "web extra" video of about four minutes of the interview with Mr. Elizondo, in which Mr. Elizondo speaks, in guarded terms, of the steps that he believes must precede release of further UAP data by TTSA. The broadcast, video, and related material may be accessed here.
     
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  18. Dean

    Dean Adept Dabbler

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    I am now attaching a complete "official" transcript of the "2018 Annual Meeting of Stockholders of the To The Stars Academy of Arts and Science Inc.," as downloaded from the TTSA website. Although the transcript (oddly) does not contain the date of the event, it occurred on December 12, 2018. This 30-minute event was open to all stockholders via a telephone hook up, which did not allow verbal participation but did allow electronic voting on four formal proposals, as described in the transcript. You will note that three questions from stockholders were addressed at the end; these presumably were selected from the questions submitted in advance via a webform.
     

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  19. wwkirk

    wwkirk Celestial

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    Aren't the "stockholder" really just donors who are in no position to expect anything?
     
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  20. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    I would think stockholders are ones who have a vested interest in results and are more than just donors in that regards...They would be regularly funding the program but expecting results of some sort...

    ...
     
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