Ray Stanford's Instructions for Greeting the Occupants of the UFO That Would Land (1973)

Discussion in 'UFOs & Sightings' started by Justice Fodor, Feb 10, 2019.

  1. The shadow

    The shadow The shadow knows!

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    Thank you for your response . I find it to be informative.
     
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  2. humanoidlord

    humanoidlord ce3 researcher

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    there is an old saying called "PICS OR IT DIN'T HAPPEN" wich applies beautifully here
     
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  3. humanoidlord

    humanoidlord ce3 researcher

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    there is something about COB that doesn't feels right about his alleged program for tracking UFOs
     
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  4. Creepy Green Light

    Creepy Green Light Don't mistake lack of talent for genius

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    I saw the other day he got snarky when questioned about his SLV project & said something to the tune of "Yeah, and hows your motion detection UFO tracking program going?"
     
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  5. pigfarmer

    pigfarmer tall, thin, irritable

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    When I've heard him on the Paracast it sounded to me as if he has a bit of a fanboy crush on Ray. Also that he seeks validation and Ray is probably giving it to him.

    Again - RS deserves some respect for finding fossils and is getting some from the Smithsonian.

    Maryland: A Fertile State for Dinosaur Fossils - Smithsonian Associates

    No doubt he can be quite convincing and CO probably didn't need to be persuaded to believe what RS has been saying.
     
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  6. goblin

    goblin Noble

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    He can be a touch prickly, eh?
     
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  7. Creepy Green Light

    Creepy Green Light Don't mistake lack of talent for genius

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    CO falls into the category I mentioned earlier; super credible guy where you believe all his work - but then has one wrench thrown into his entire career w/ UFO's, and that wrench is RS. And as I stated earlier, CO isn't the one anomaly in all this. Seems like quite a few prominent figures in the field have their one or two own "wrenches".
     
  8. Creepy Green Light

    Creepy Green Light Don't mistake lack of talent for genius

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    Much so. Highly defensive. When I read his comment I said to myself "Yeah, but the other person hasn't been boasting of this ground breaking video capture, remote sensors in the woods/mountains program for 10+ years. But YOU have."
     
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  9. pigfarmer

    pigfarmer tall, thin, irritable

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    I am impressed by the fact he got off his ass and spent time and money looking into it for himself. Not sure I believe everything he has said. RS is an albatross around his neck though.
     
  10. Creepy Green Light

    Creepy Green Light Don't mistake lack of talent for genius

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    Agreed. And that's where I have to make the decision whether to believe or disbelieve because of CO's backing of RS. I wouldn't throw out all of CO's work just because of his affiliation w/ one wacky guy (although it leaves us with the question of "why?"). Just like I wouldn't throw out all of Stan Friedman's good work because of him endorsing Frank Feschino Jr.'s version of the Flatwoods Monster case. It definitely makes me say "Wow. He REALLY believes that? Okay."

    Maybe the joke will be on me? Maybe after RS passes away people going through his stuff will find he did in fact take Billy Meier quality photos & videos of flying saucers. Highly doubtful but anything is possible.
     
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  11. Standingstones

    Standingstones Celestial

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    You and I will never see those wonderful UFO photos. O’Brien had stated that Ray Stanford told him there was a good chance he might burn the whole lot. If he won’t release them while alive, don’t hold your breath once he passes.

    (PS... this speaks of “Bitter Old Man” disease.)
     
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  12. Creepy Green Light

    Creepy Green Light Don't mistake lack of talent for genius

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    That literally made me laugh out loud with the visual it gave me. Thank you :)

    The first time I heard Stanford being interviewed was on the Paracast. I think after the first 60 seconds I was convinced the guy was a nut job (and up to this point have never heard of the guy). Then the more I listened I became even more convinced - thinking "Oh my lord - this guy sounds like he only has a couple marbles left in his head rolling around." Then I think I was in a state of shock when I heard CO backing him. Something doesn't sit right with that but alas, we'll never figure it out. I hate the phrase "it is what it is" but.....it is.
     
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  13. Creepy Green Light

    Creepy Green Light Don't mistake lack of talent for genius

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    For those that have never read this piece;:smilewide:

    Ray and his identical twin brother, Rex, came of age when UFOs were booming. The first wave of sightings occurred in 1947, when Ray was 9. At 15, in 1953, Ray devoured George Adamski’s pulpy alien-contact tract, “Flying Saucers Have Landed,” and began corresponding with Adamski.

    Later, a photo Adamski took of a flying saucer was revealed as a cheap hoax, a metal lid with light bulbs as landing gear. Ray still stings from that deceit. He spits out Adamski’s name like a hard seed.

    Ray built rockets and won first prize in the 1955 Texas state physics competition. Despite obvious talent, he never managed college. Instead, he moved to Austin and became a psychic. Whoever came up with the slogan “Keep Austin Weird” may have had Ray Stanford in mind.

    Starting in 1961, he made his living leading a group of paranormal explorers called the Association for the Understanding of Man. He charged $35 for psychic readings, and the group sold recordings and transcripts of Stanford’s readings, in which he made contact with veiled entities who offered their opinion on the Fatima miracle, the nature of Christ, or whether the readee had a dread disease. Rex, meanwhile, became a professor of psychology at St. John’s University in New York, where he studied ESP, among other things.

    Two big donors — an Austin real estate mogul and a Texas oilman — helped launch Ray Stanford’s next venture in the early 1970s, the one that catapulted him to middling media glory: Project Starlight International.

    Donning white jumpsuits and green goggles, Stanford and his merry band of alien hunters built a landing pad in the hills west of Austin. It was ringed with spotlights that flashed odd rhythms. A chunky device shot a laser into the sky that transmitted, via pulses, messages of peace. It was totally disco.

    Stanford would wave at the sky and shout, “LAND OVER HERE. WE HAVE NO WEAPONS.”

    Big VHS video cameras, magnetometers and gravitometers were at the ready to document any fly-bys or landings.

    This was a time in America when UFOs made the nightly news. Saucers over Phoenix. Cigars buzzing Buffalo. A streaking flash in Utah. The late 1960s to the late 1970s saw a fevered peak of the UFO craze, and Ray Stanford was smack in the middle of it. No, he never became as famous as Barney and Betty Hill, whose alien abduction story launched a Hollywood-mythological-industrial complex that climaxed during the nine-year run of “The X-Files.” But he worked the media and clawed at the center of the fray.

    He made the Phil Donahue show.

    He chased a lot of UFOs. Er, AAOs. He documented it all. And he’s showing me everything. For seven hours, Ray Stanford reels through 437 PowerPoint slides. That’s Part 1.

    Deltoids. Shuttlecraft. Saucers. Motherships. Beam-ahead propulsion. Time-shifting. Dimensional leaps. Military men. NASA labs, coverups, a green glass globe on the moon.

    It would take Fox Mulder another decade to chase it all down.

    Toward the end — it’s nearly 6 p.m.! — I’m feeling faint from lack of food and drink. Reverting to his less preferred term, Stanford says, “This is as good evidence you’ll see for UFOs anywhere.”

    I want to believe. I do.

    “The universe is so damn strange.”

    “The aliens, are they trying to create religion?”

    “I’m not saying this is true, but maybe we’re just something for them to play with.”

    “It may be a tourist operation? This could be Disneyland for them!”

    Ray Stanford more than believes. He has invested his life in documenting UFOs. And perhaps, I think, just maybe, his wildest notions lie a nanometer inside the realm of possibility. A city in space, green globes on the moon, astronauts conversing with aliens — much of it is easy to debunk. But who am I to say that time-stopping, dimension-hopping aliens do not exist? A negative cannot be proven.

    And that, of course, is the crux of why the alien hypothesis will never die. There’s no way to exclude all possibility. Anything can and might happen. An enormous pterosaur may have landed in your backyard 112 million years ago and you — you — dig up the handprint! I mean, what are the chances?

    So the aliens live on, in Stanford’s mind, and on his computer, and who knows, maybe up there, too.

    ***

    Iam back in Stanford’s office.

    Again, I ask him why he thinks he sees the AAOs and the footprints.

    He tells me a story from his childhood. When he was 6 or 7, a big redheaded 9-year-old smacked him on the head. “Rattlebrain!” Stanford shouts, tearing up. “I had this rattlebrain for at least three years.”

    The blow rewired his brain, he tells me, turning him into a “walking, talking detector.”

    I am in no position to disagree.

    Stung by criticism of his UFO hunting, Stanford keeps that part of his life out of view of some of his dinosaur collaborators. Bakker, for one, didn’t know about Stanford’s past. “It’s more of a religion” than a science, Bakker said of UFO hunting in general.

    “You can wound him deeply by saying he’s a crackpot,” says John Young, 40, a computer programmer whose father was a member of Project Starlight. As a 5- and 6-year-old, Young ran around the UFO landing pad, enthralled by the light show. “Lots of people give Ray a hard time, but he’s the real deal — a maverick, an eccentric gentleman, just a supercool guy. He is 100 percent what-you-see-is-what-you-get. He’s a genuine dude. He is doing it because he wants to learn the truth, not to sell copies of the DVD. There is no DVD. He’s just that way.”

    Young pauses, dramatically: “He’s a searcher.”

    I think about that. Like all of life’s profundities, the lesson Ray Stanford has to offer the world may be a simple one: Keep your eyes open. Keep looking. A hidden world, a universe trapped in time, a realm so foreign and bizarre as to stretch all credulity, may be lurking just beneath your feet — or, maybe, just maybe, winging over your head.

    Brian Vastag is a Post science reporter. To comment on this article, send e-mail to wpletters@washpost.com.
     
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  14. goblin

    goblin Noble

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    Hope never dies 100% in the UFO world so I'll predict even if something is found after Mr. Stanford's eventual passing, if it does not live up to expectations people will believe he had other, better evidence that he destroyed, or was stolen, or is being suppressed, or has yet to be found, etc.
     
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  15. humanoidlord

    humanoidlord ce3 researcher

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    @Justice Fodor hmm???
     
  16. Justice Fodor

    Justice Fodor "Nobody wants justice." -- Alan Dershowitz

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    I have not encountered any other statement attributed to Ray Stanford, pertaining to "green globes on the moon."
     
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  17. Justice Fodor

    Justice Fodor "Nobody wants justice." -- Alan Dershowitz

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    Today I started "Ray Stanford Close-Up" thread no. 6, dealing further with "Aramda," the extraterrestrial "Brother" (i.e., member of the White Brotherhood) with whom Stanford said he had repeated contacts in the 1950s-1970s, some involving UFO close encounters. The new post includes audio excerpts of Stanford talking about his long (38,000-year!) association with Aramda, and Stanford channeling Aramda from a trance. This material provides important context for Stanford's claims about the origins and purposes of Project Starlight International.
     
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