Recognition of the Sixth Sense

Discussion in 'Parapsychology' started by wwkirk, Nov 17, 2018.

  1. wwkirk

    wwkirk Noble

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    An article by Annie Jacobsen, a journalist and the author of Phenomena, from which this was adapted, and the Pulitzer finalist The Pentagon’s Brain, among other books.

    The U.S. Military Believes People Have a Sixth Sense
    In 2014, the Office of Naval Research embarked on a four-year, $3.85 million research program to explore the phenomena it calls premonition and intuition, or “Spidey sense,” for sailors and Marines.

    “We have to understand what gives rise to this so-called ‘sixth sense,’ says Peter Squire, a program officer in ONR’s Expeditionary Maneuver Warfare and Combating Terrorism department. Today’s Navy scientists place less emphasis on trying to understand the phenomena theoretically and more on using technology to examine the mysterious process, which Navy scientists assure the public is not based on superstition. “If the researchers understand the process, there may be ways to accelerate it — and possibly spread the powers of intuition throughout military units,” says Dr. Squire. The Pentagon’s focus is to maximize the power of the sixth sense for operational use. “If we can characterize this intuitive decision-making process and model it, then the hope is to accelerate the acquisition of these skills,” says Lieutenant Commander Brent Olde of ONR’s Warfighter Performance Department for Human and Bioengineered Systems. “[Are] there ways to improve premonition through training?” he asks.

    According to the Pentagon, the program was born of field reports from the war theater, including a 2006 incident in Iraq, when Staff Sergeant Martin Richburg, using intuition, prevented carnage in an IED, or improvised explosive device, incident. Commander Joseph Cohn, a program manager at the naval office, told the New York Times, “These reports from the field often detailed a ‘sixth sense’ or ‘Spidey sense’ that alerted them to an impending attack or I.E.D., or that allowed them to respond to a novel situation without consciously analyzing the situation.”

    More than a decade later, today’s Defense Department has accelerated practical applications of this concept. Active-duty Marines are being taught to hone precognitive skills in order to “preempt snipers, IED emplacers and other irregular assaults [using] advanced perceptual competences that have not been well studied.” Because of the stigma of ESP and PK, the nomenclature has changed, allowing the Defense Department to distance itself from its remote-viewing past. Under the Perceptual Training Systems and Tools banner, extrasensory perception has a new name in the modern era: “sensemaking.” In official Defense Department literature sensemaking is defined as “a motivated continuous effort to understand connections (which can be among people, places, and events) in order to anticipate their trajectories and act effectively.”

    Over decades, wars change location and weapons design evolves, while man’s perceptual capacities remain relatively close to what they have been for thousands of years. Fifty years ago in Vietnam, Joe McMoneagle used his sixth sense to avoid stepping on booby traps, falling into punji pits, and walking into Viet Cong ambushes. His ability to sense danger was not lost on his fellow soldiers, and the power of his intuitive capabilities spread throughout his military unit. Other soldiers had confidence in this subconscious ability and followed McMoneagle’s lead. In a life-or-death environment there was no room for skepticism or ignominy. If it saved lives, it was real. Since 1972, CIA and DoD research indicates that premonition, or precognition, appears to be weak in some, strong in others, and extraordinary in a rare few. Will the Navy’s contemporary work on “sensemaking,” the continuous effort to understand the connections among people, places, and events, finally unlock the mystery of ESP? Might technology available to today’s defense scientists reveal hypothe- ses not available to scientists in an earlier age?

    At Naval Hospital Bremerton, in Washington State, defense scientists and military researchers are exploring cognition and perception in soldiers’ virtual dream states. Starting in 2011, as part of a research program called Power Dreaming, soldiers plagued by PTSD-related nightmares have used biofeedback techniques similar to those studied by Colonel John Alexander in the Intelligence and Security Command’s Beyond Excellence program, under General Albert Stubblebine. For today’s Navy, biofeedback has been updated with twenty-first-century virtual reality technology that did not exist 30 years ago. Sponsored by the Naval Medical Research Center, the Power Dreaming program involves a process called Cognitive Behavioral Treatment for Warrior Trainees. Participants are active-duty soldiers suffering from PTSD-related nightmares who are eligible to be sent back to the battlefield. The method, called redreaming, is alleged to be a learned technique that produces changes in the way one’s brain processes information. Its goal is to teach trainees to transform their debilitating nightmares into empowering dreams using bio- feedback techniques and computer technology.

    Biofeedback, born in 1962, draws on the idea that the human brain (millions of years in the making) can benefit from seeing itself work in real time. Some of the life processes the trainee can see in real time are his brain waves, heart rate, muscle tension, skin conductance, and pain perception. The process goes like this: when the soldier wakes up from a nightmare, he gets out of bed and goes to a nearby government-issued computer. He puts on 3-D goggles and straps a Heart Rate Variability biofeedback device onto his forearm so that biofeedback can be integrated into the redreaming process. Hooked up to these two devices, the soldier opens a software program called the Book of Dreams. With a few clicks on the keyboard, he enters the virtual world Second Life.
     
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  2. SOUL-DRIFTER

    SOUL-DRIFTER Administrator

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    To me the 6th sense is the psychic energy from within. Doesn't matter what you do whether sensing someone staring at you from behind, reading minds, seeing the future or moving an object with your mind. It is all the same energy.....

    IMHO
     
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  3. Kchoo

    Kchoo Celestial

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    I KNEW IT! :Thumbsup:
     
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  4. Rick Hunter

    Rick Hunter Honorable

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    I'm quite intrigued by the concept of a sixth sense. Any of you have the gift? If so, how do you use it?
     
  5. Kchoo

    Kchoo Celestial

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    Ever felt the hair raise on the back of your neck for no obvious reason? Then you have it.
     
  6. Rick Hunter

    Rick Hunter Honorable

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    Hmm, I have had feelings similar to that. Particularly in dreams, where the muscles in my back start tensing up in a very uncomfortable (but not painful) fashion. Like I am waiting for something to suddenly reveal itself.
     
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  7. Autumn Sun

    Autumn Sun Adept

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    Those who have gifts won't jump out and reveal themselves so easily.
     
  8. Darling

    Darling Adept

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    My mother definitely has this. She has communicated with dead relatives that predicted things that happened, and can always tell when something bad is going to happen.
     
  9. SOUL-DRIFTER

    SOUL-DRIFTER Administrator

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    In my mid twenties I was very psychic.
    Had all the abilities, from reading thoughts, predicting future events, seeing hidden items, astral project, telekinesis.
    But if one does not keep using it, it will fade and go away.
    That is what has happened with me.
    I am 60 now so it has been over 35 years ago.
     
  10. Darling

    Darling Adept

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    Did you train yourself to be able to do this, or did it develop without you realising? I'm heading into my 20's and the thought of being able to train myself to turn this paranoia into something actually real is very intriguing. So far all my brain does is freak me out by making me convinced I'm seeing things, or something will jump out at me in the dark, ect.
     
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  11. pigfarmer

    pigfarmer tall, thin, irritable

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    I generally trust my gut instincts and believe that yes, whatever the hell a sixth sense is - it exists. Precognition of an external event.

    But just to confuse the matter, when it comes to dealing with people I use the same method my dog does; pay attention to many, many subtle clues - so subtle maybe you don't even notice them yourself. Maybe more human nature than any paranormal sense. A simple change in breathing, a glance, hand gesture etc.

    In other words, at a certain point we enter unintentionally enter into the realm that many fake psychics inhabit and make a living from.
     
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  12. SOUL-DRIFTER

    SOUL-DRIFTER Administrator

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    I was always somewhat psychic. But I actually trained in my late teens. I always carried a deck of cards then and practiced trying to see through them to see what the card was that I would draw. I kept a record of my performances and made every effort not to gain any way of unconsciously cheating. Replaced the decks regularly and always made sure the backs got no distinctive marks or wear over any other card. I started doing this at about 16 or 17 and did it everyday sometimes several times a day for 4 or 5 years. I reached a point of correctly naming the card 14 times of a single deck of 52. I averaged 7 -8. To correctly name a card exactly of 52 different cards is 1 in 52.
    Later when I was about 21 I started doing regular mental exercises and meditation. Everyday in the evening I would meditate and train my mind to control and focus my mind to as an extreme level as I could.

    The first step was to be able to totally tune out any and ALL sensory inputs. Sounds, skin feelings/sensations. Sight was simply closing ones eyes in a darkened room.

    Second step was to train myself to totally eliminate any and all thoughts. Shut down all mental sounds and sights to have only blackness. Like a clean blackboard, the mind must be free and clear COMPLETELY. To truly attain that is much harder than it sounds.

    Step three is to think of a very simple item. I started with a penny. I visualized it suspended against a dark background as I wanted to other images other than the penny. One must pay close attention to how your mind tries to imagine the object. You must ALWAYS be in control. If it is to move be sure it moves at the rate you desire. Same for the image quality.
    The goal is control and as you get confidence your mental images will get clearer and clearer and you will have greater control. As it progresses you will be able to create any image or world and be in total control. Smells, sounds it will become almost real.

    My fourth step was to hyperventilate while rubbing my hands together for about 1 - 2 minutes and turn my eyes up in my head to try to focus on the third eye.. Then hold them apart and sometimes I could feel a cushion feeling between. Real or imaginary I do not know, but I got the feeling regularly doing this. I did this because according to a psychic I met in Lake Tahoe in 1979 it would help to generate psychic energy.

    My last step was an attempt to move an object by mind alone. I did this attempt usually only one a day and used very small objects like empty pop cans, pencils or paper clips. I had absolutely no success for about 9 months until one evening. BINGO the eye glasses I was working on moved on mental command. I took a break, sat back down and again they moved at the speed and direction I had mentally visualized it to.

    Keep in mind this may not work as well for you or perhaps even batter.

    It depends on what it is you want....
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2018 at 2:16 AM
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  13. Darling

    Darling Adept

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    My brain is always racing, I've been trying meditation to calm it. Who knows, it may result in the start of something cool...
     
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  14. Rick Hunter

    Rick Hunter Honorable

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    I'm no psychic and would do a poor job of playing one on TV. I have read a fair amount about it though. I think you would be well served to first determine what is being created by your mind and what is coming to you through your mind. A visit to a psychiatrist may be a good start, if you haven't done so already. Get yourself screened for maladies which can produce hallucinations or unwelcome thoughts. Not just the big ones like Schizophrenia, Mania, and Bipolar Disorder, but even more common conditions such as depression and ADHD. Getting any of these conditions under control will certainly help you to get the most out of any abilities you have.
     
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  15. Kchoo

    Kchoo Celestial

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    Lol... i was going to say it is nothing to worry about...
     
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  16. Darling

    Darling Adept

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    Oh, I definitely believe I have some sort of combination of symptoms from depression, ADHD, insomnia, anxiety, and possibly even paranoia. So far, it hasn't effected me too negatively, but I am planning to see a uni councillor once I start in March, as it will be free as part of my schooling. The only reason I haven't seen someone for it so far is that high school councillors (or at least the ones I knew of and had access to) are useless, and since I'm legally an adult, I'd have to pay to see someone professional. I do believe ADHD is the big one. It helps in some cases, but seriously frustrates me in others. I have tried meditation and other forms of discipline such as keeping journals and trying to impose deadlines and get rid of distractions, but nothing works. No matter how hard I try, I always am stuck waiting until the last moment to start a paper, or get an application in. So now I'm doing the opposite. I try to keep myself busy, so I have little time to procrastinate. That somewhat works.
     

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