Spectacular Views of Comet Neowise

Discussion in 'Science, Tech, & Space Exploration' started by nivek, Jul 17, 2020.

  1. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    Spectacular Views of Comet Neowise

    For the next month, comet C/2020 F3 (NEOWISE), otherwise known as “Neowise,” will be visible in the night sky above much of the Northern Hemisphere. The comet will be at its brightest this week, dimming as it moves away from the sun. If you have clear skies, head outside about an hour after sunset and look near the horizon to the northwest. For the next week or so, if it’s dark enough, Neowise might be visible to the naked eye, but you may need binoculars to see it well. The images in the photos below are made with long exposures, so they may appear stronger than what you’d see with your own eyes, but it’s still worth a look—this is the brightest comet we’ve seen in 23 years, and after this, Neowise won’t be back for another 6,800 years.

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    Neowise is seen behind an Orthodox church in Belarus, 110 kilometers west of Minsk, early on July 14, 2020. - Sergei Grits / AP
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    In this image released by NASA, Neowise, left, is seen above the eastern horizon in this image taken from the International Space Station on July 5, 2020. - NASA via AP
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    Neowise seen at sunset in Hungary on July 14, 2020 - Varga Jozsef Zoltan / Shutterstock
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    Neowise rises in the sky over lower Manhattan and the Empire State Building before sunrise on July 14, 2020, as seen from Jersey City, New Jersey. - Gary Hershorn / Getty
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    Neowise, viewed on a misty sunrise in Ukraine - Anton Petrus / Getty
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    A stork stands on a power pole as Neowise is seen in the sky above the village of Kreva, Belarus, early on July 13, 2020. - Sergei Gapon / AFP / Getty
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    A view of Neowise on July 11, 2020, from Schriesheim, Germany - David Hajnal / Shutterstock
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    A closer view of Neowise over Belarus, seen early on July 14, 2020 - Sergei Grits / AP
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    Neowise over Dublin, Ireland, on July 11, 2020 - Mikalaureque / Shutterstock
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    A person views Neowise over Ballintoy, Northern Ireland, on July 8, 2020. - Nightskyhunter via Reuters

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  2. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    Glimpse NEOWISE before it fades away. It won't be back for 6,800 years!

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    The rare opportunity to spot a comet has arrived for evening skywatchers, and people may want to plan accordingly to look for the object on a clear night before it fades away. Comets are far less predictable than the weather, and after NEOWISE passes, it is unclear when the next chance will come to spot a comet in the night sky.

    “Discovered on March 27, 2020 by NASA’s Near-Earth Object Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (NEOWISE) mission, Comet NEOWISE is putting on a dazzling display for skywatchers before it disappears, not to be seen again for another 6,800 years,” NASA said.

    After being visible only in the early morning sky through the first half of July, the comet is now a feature in the evening sky, becoming visible about one or two hours after sunset.

    Onlookers can spot the comet in the northwestern sky below the constellation Ursa Major (also known as the Big Dipper) through July 23, with it appearing slighter higher in the sky each night. By the last weekend of July, Comet NEOWISE will begin to fade as it moves farther away from the sun and the Earth on its journey back into the far reaches of our solar system.

    Comet NEOWISE is visible to the naked eye, but it is still very dim. Light pollution can make it difficult to spot the comet, so people should try to head to a dark area away from city lights with a clear view of the northwestern sky. Humid, hazy air can also have an effect on viewing conditions.

    “If you’re looking at the sky without the help of observation tools, Comet NEOWISE will likely look like a fuzzy star with a bit of a tail, so using binoculars or a small telescope is recommended to get the best views of this object,” NASA said.

    (more on the link)

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  3. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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