Statue Removals - a running list

Discussion in 'Present & Current Events' started by nivek, Jun 19, 2018.

  1. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    So here's a list of the history being taken down and in some cases destroyed...Whilst I agree that some if not many of those statues should be removed and relocated or even destroyed in some cases, I do not agree with the mob rules mentality that forced this to happen...What's next book burnings?...Witch hunts?...

    Which Confederate statues were removed? A running list

    More than 30 cities across the United States have removed or relocated Confederate statues and monuments amid an intense nationwide debate about race and history.


    After a “Unite the Right” rally in Virginia in August to protest against the removal of a statue of Robert E. Lee resulted in the death of a woman who was demonstrating against white supremacy, other cities have decided to remove Confederate statues.


    Many of the controversial monuments were dedicated in the early twentieth century or during the height of the Civil Rights Movement. Discussions are under way about the removal of monuments in Houston, Atlanta, Nashville, Pensacola, Florida, Jacksonville, Florida, Richmond, Virginia, Birmingham, Alabama, and Charlottesville, Virginia.


    Here is a running list of all the monuments and statues that have been removed and the cities that have taken them down:


    Annapolis, Md.


    Under cover of darkness, city workers removed a statue in August 2017 of former Supreme Court Justice Roger Taney that had been on the State House’s front lawn for 145 years. Taney authored the Supreme Court’s 1857 Dred Scott decision, which held that African-Americans could not be U.S. citizens. The city’s Republican mayor said through a spokesman that it was removed “as a matter of public safety.”

    Austin, Texas

    The statues of four people with ties to the Confederacy – Robert E. Lee, Albert Sidney Johnson, John H. Reagan and former Texas Gov. James Stephen Hogg – were removed from pedestals on the University of Texas campus on Aug. 17, 2017. UT’s president said in a written statement the deadly clashes in Charlottesville made it clear “Confederate monuments have become symbols of modern white supremacy and neo-Nazism.” Separately, a 1,200-pound bronze statue of Confederate President Jefferson Davis that was removed from UT’s campus in 2015 has now returned to the campus, at the Briscoe Center for American History.

    The Austin school board voted to strip Confederate names from five district schools, though they haven’t been renamed yet. The board had previously renamed Robert E. Lee Elementary School in 2016.

    The Austin City Council approved renaming Robert E. Lee Road and Jeff Davis Avenue.

    Baltimore, Md.

    Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh told reporters she wanted to move “quickly and quietly” to take down four Confederate statues or monuments – statues of Lee and Thomas, J. “Stonewall” Jackson and monuments for Confederate Soldiers and Sailors and Confederate Women – from the city’s public spaces. Although the plan had been in the works since June 2017, the Baltimore City Council approved it only two days after the deadly events in Charlottesville. On March 10, 2018, the space where the Confederate statues had stood was rededicated to abolitionist and civil rights pioneer Harriet Tubman.

    Bradenton, Fla.

    Mantee County removed a Confederate soldiers memorial obelisk on Aug. 24 after the city commission voted 4-3 to take it down and place it in storage. The monument, which had stood there for more than 90 years, was accidentally broken into two pieces when city workers removed it. The removal came after days of protests from residents and activists, most of whom were in favor of taking it down, and it cost $12,700 to remove.

    Brooklyn, N.Y.

    Plaques honoring Lee were removed from an episcopal church’s property on Aug. 16, 2017 and the governor called on the Army to remove the names of Lee and another Confederate general from the streets around a nearby fort. “It was very easy for us to say, ‘OK, we'll take the plaques down,'” said Bishop Lawrence Provenzano, of the Episcopal Diocese of Long Island, who called them “offensive to the community.” New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio has called for a review of all the city’s public art to identify “symbols of hate” for possible removal.

    Dallas, Texas

    A bronze statue of Robert E. Lee, formally called the Robert Edward Lee Sculpture, was removed in mid-September 2017 from Robert E. Lee Park, which was also named in honor of the Confederate general. The Dallas City Council voted 13-1 to remove the statue, which has stood in Lee Park for 81 years.

    The park was dedicated to Lee by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt in 1936 during a renaming ceremony of the park.

    Daytona Beach, Fla.

    Three Confederate monuments were removed from a city park Friday morning. A city spokesperson said the plaques were going to be cleaned up and taken to a nearby museum. The decision to remove them did not require public input, the spokes-person told FOX35, because they were donated and not purchased with taxpayer funds.

    Durham, N.C.

    A nearly-century old statue of a Confederate soldier was toppled not long after Charlottesville by protesters associated with the Workers World party. North Carolina Central University student Takiyah Thompson, along with three others, were arrested and charged with felonies in the days following. As the bronze statue lay crumpled on the ground, protesters could be seen kicking it on social media. A Worthington assistant city manager said the community seeks to be one that “promotes tolerance, respect and inclusion.”

    A statute of Lee was removed from the entrance to Duke University Chapel on Aug. 19, 2017 and is set to be preserved in some way to study the university's "complex past."

    "I took this course of action to protect Duke Chapel, to ensure the vital safety of students and community members who worship there, and above all to express the deep and abiding values of our university," university President Vincent Price wrote in statement to the school.

    Franklin, Ohio

    A monument to Lee was removed in August 2017 by Franklin workers.

    Gainesville, Fla.

    A chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy paid for the removal of a monument to Confederate soldiers known locally as “Old Joe” that stood in front a building in downtown Gainesville for 113 years. It was moved to a private cemetery outside the city in August 2017.

    Helena, Mont.

    The state's capital city on Aug. 18, 2017 removed a memorial to Confederate soldiers that had been in a public park since 1916. the granite fountain, which was dismantled, had been donated by the United Daughters of the Confederacy. City Parks and Recreation Director Amy Teegarden told the Spokesman-Review that the fountain initially will be stored in a city warehouse -- but it could be reassembled at a future date.

    Kansas City, Mo.

    A Confederate monument was boxed up in summer 2017 and is slated to be removed. The Missouri division of the United Daughters of the Confederacy had asked Kansas City Parks and Recreation to find a new home for it.

    Lexington, Ky.

    Two 130-year-old Confederate statues were removed from downtown Lexington on October 18 after the state's attorney general issued an opinion giving the city permission to take them down and move them to a private cemetery. Lexington used private funds to take the statues, of Confederate General John Hunt Morgan and John Breckinridge, a former U.S. Vice President and the last Confederate Secretary of War. Private funds will cover the cost of their upkeep in the cemetery.

    Los Angeles, Calif.

    A large stone monument commemorating Confederate veterans was taken down Aug. 16 from the Hollywood Forever Cemetery after hundreds of people demanded its removal. The 6-foot granite marker was loaded into a pickup truck and taken to a storage facility. A petition calling for it to be taken down had garnered 1,300 signatures.

    Louisville, Ky.

    A statue of a Confederate soldier was removed from the University of Louisville campus after a legal battle between the city residents, the mayor and the Sons of Confederate Veterans. It was relocated to Brandenburg, Kentucky, which hosts Civil War reenactments.

    Madison, Wis.

    A plaque honoring Confederate soldiers was removed Aug. 17 from a cemetery not long after residents and city leaders began calling for it to be taken down. “The Civil War was an act of insurrection and treason and a defense of the deplorable practice of slavery,” said Mayor Paul Soglin in a statement. “The monuments in question were connected to that action and we do not need them on city property.”

    Memphis, Tenn.

    Crews removed two Confederate statues from Memphis parks on Dec. 20 after the city sold them to a private entity. The City Council voted unanimously earlier in the day to sell both Health Sciences and Fourth Bluff Parks where the Confederate statues, of Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest and Confederate President Jefferson Davis, were located.

    Nashville, Tenn.

    The legendary Ryman Auditorium, where stars like Dolly Parton, Patsy Cline and Loretta Lynn made their Grand Ole Opry debuts, quietly moved a sign on Sept. 21 hanging from the venue's upper level that read "1897 Confederate Gallery." Honoring an 1897 reunion of Confederate veterans at the Ryman, the sign had been shrouded over the years but has now been permanently removed from the main auditorium and added to a museum exhibit that explains the history of the 125-year-old music hall.

    New Orleans, La.

    New Orleans city workers removed four monuments in April dedicated to the Confederacy and opponents of Reconstruction. The city council had declared the monuments a public nuisance. The monuments removed were of Confederate General P.G.T. Beauregard, Davis and Lee. Also removed was the Liberty Place Monument, which commemorated a Reconstruction Era white supremacist attack on the city’s integrated police force. The mayor plans to replace them with new fountains and an American flag.

    New York, N.Y.

    Busts of Lee and Jackson were removed overnight on Aug. 17 from the Hall of Fame for Great Americans at Bronx Community College. Prior to its removal, Bronx Borough president Ruben Diaz Jr. had said "there is nothing great about two men who committed treason against the United States to fight to keep the institution of slavery in tact.”

    Orlando, Fla.

    A Confederate statue known as "Johnny Reb" was moved in June 2017 by officials from Lake Eola Park to Greenwood Cemetery in response to public outcry about it being symbolic of hate and white supremacy. A spokesperson for Orlando’s mayor told Fox News that city officials are working with historians on a new inscription to put the monument “in proper historical perspective.”

    Richmond, Va.

    The Richmond school board voted 6-1 on June 18, 2018 to rename J.E.B. Stuart Elementary School to Barack Obama Elementary School. The process began several months prior and involved input from students, teachers, administrators and local stakeholders. Virginia is home to the largest number of Confederate monuments and symbols in the country.

    Rockville, Md.

    A 13-ton bronze Confederate statue that had stood for decades next to Rockville’s Red Brick Courthouse was relocated in July next to a privately run Potomac River ferry named for a Confederate general. The relocation cost about $100,000, according to the Washington Post.

    San Diego, Calif.

    A plaque honoring Davis was quietly removed Aug. 16, 2017 from a downtown park. “This morning I ordered the immediate removal of a plaque honoring the Confederacy at Horton Plaza Park,” Mayor Kevin Faulconer told the Los Angeles Times. “San Diegans stand together against Confederate symbols of division.”

    San Antonio, Texas

    A Confederate statue was removed from Travis Park overnight Sept. 1, 2017 after the City Council voted 10-1 in favor of taking it down the previous day. There were no protesters during or after the removal, according to local media reports. "This is, without context, a monument that glorifies the causes of the Confederacy, and that's not something that a modern city needs to have in a public square," said San Antonio Mayor Ron Nirenberg following the council vote.

    San Antonio, Texas

    A Jefferson Davis highway marker was removed in 2016.

    St. Louis, Mo.

    The Missouri Civil War Museum oversaw the removal in late June 2017 of a 32-foot granite and bronze monument from Forest Park, where it had stood for 103 years. It shouldered the costs of removal and will hold the monument in storage until a new home can be found for it. The agreement stipulates the monument can be re-displayed at a Civil War museum, battlefield or cemetery. In Boone County, a rock with a plaque honoring Confederate soldiers that had been removed from the University of Missouri campus was relocated a second time after the Charleston AEM church massacre to a historic site commemorating a nearby Civil War battle.

    St. Petersburg, Fla.

    St. Petersburg Mayor Rick Kriseman ordered city workers to remove a bronze Confederate marker at noon on Aug. 15, 2017 after determining that it was on city property. It’s being held in storage until a new home can be found for it. "The plaque recognizing a highway named after Stonewall Jackson has been removed and we will attempt to locate its owner,” Kriseman said in a statement to the Tampa Bay Times.

    Washington, D.C.

    The stewards of the National Mall announced this week that the exhibit alongside the Thomas Jefferson Memorial will be updated to showcase his status as both one of the country's founders and a slaveholder. "We can reflect the momentous contributions of someone like Thomas Jefferson, but also consider carefully the complexity of who he was," an official with the Trust told the Washington Examiner. "And that's not reflected right now in the exhibits."

    New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker introduced a bill in Sept. 2017 to remove Confederate statues from the U.S. Capitol Building.

    The National Cathedral voted that same month to take down two stained-glass windows of Confederate generals. The removal could take a few days and workers seen putting up scaffolding around the windows to start the process.

    Florida Gov. Rick Scott, a Republican, signed a bill to replace a statue of a Confederate general at the U.S. Capitol with one of Mary McLeod Bethune, a black woman who founded a school that became Bethune-Cookman University in Daytona Beach, Florida. She'll become the first black female to be honored in Statuary Hall.

    Worthington, Ohio

    Worthington removed a historic marker Aug. 18 outside the former home of a Confederate general.

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  2. Castle-Yankee54

    Castle-Yankee54 Celestial

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    Lee, Jackson and davis had been deified...so its about time for them to be replaced.
     
  3. erickson

    erickson Honorable

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    Before our last trip to New Orleans I read Mitch Landrieu's book, In the Shadow of Statues. He described the statues that were removed there as being part of a stolen or perverse history. He was right.

    The history of that time is well-preserved: the plantations, battlefields, slave auction sites, and other parts of our history remain. The true history was all around us. The statues are about something else, the Lost Cause, Jim Crow, a response to reconstruction or civil rights.

    On previous trips to New Orleans we did not give Lee a second thought when we took the trolley through the circle, out to Camelia Grill for pecan waffles. That was wrong. I had enough privilege to ignore it, but the meaning of the statue should not have been ignored. It took some dedicated work to show us a better way.

    I am also glad that my African-American grandchild will not come here someday and walk under the gaze of Lee. There is the right side of history and the wrong side. We should honor those who stood for the right- for freedom and justice for all. We spent much of our trip finding that history. The empty pedestal here was more than enough to remind me of the history that the statue was embodied.

    41F5D53A-D60E-4115-AA1B-FF0D27B9A64A-1830-000002375D96F151.png
     
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  4. Castle-Yankee54

    Castle-Yankee54 Celestial

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    I have no idea why either of them would have been put there in the first place.
     
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  5. Shadowprophet

    Shadowprophet Truthiness

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    My thing is, I think people are letting things get out of hand, This isn't 1492, Who looks up to a statue like it's glorifying anything anymore?

    No, These statues being removed is a simple plight, People who have small voices and small opinions take part in these lynch mobbings to feel like they are part of something bigger.

    To be honest, There is a growing concern I have about this, People want to abolish history, Erase it, Change it to fit their narrative. These people removing these historical monuments today are destroying part of history, I see it not far removed from Isis Destroying monuments over there. "Let's destroy America one way or another, We will get groups of people who feel small and ignored all fired up fighting pointless causes and in time they will destroy everything for us"

    I'm so sick of it.

    every asshole I see playing guitar while fifty rednecks pull down a statue with a rope, I see Sheep, Small unintelligent people who have no respect or understanding of the importance of recorded history.

    What Does the Redneck say? "Take that statue down, It offends my ability to produce unintelligible mumbles..."

    Pft... This issue is something I find upsetting, I see those people as selfish assholes who are willing to vandalize history just for their fifteen minutes in the spotlight, Denying everyone else in the future the opportunity to learn about these issues.

    Now, some people may be offended by my opinions of rednecks, Well, People who pride themselves in ignorance are not at the top of my "Polite list" Ignorance has a simple cure, This is an age of information, ignorance is the result of laziness and a lack of effort, Anyone can cure ignorance if they put in even the smallest amount of effort, So No, I do not respect ignorance, Or the embracing of cultural stereotypes that glorify ignorance. in short, Fuck a redneck.

    It's not just sad, It's infuriating.
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2019
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  6. Kchoo

    Kchoo At Peace.

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    Also, I wonder how much of this was spurred on by false interest groups pitted against each other as part of the subversive divide and conquer campaigns.

    People fell for it, hook, line and sinker.
     
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  7. Castle-Yankee54

    Castle-Yankee54 Celestial

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    I'm not really sure where history is going......its all around us. If people get all their history off monument I can see why ignorance abounds. I've been involved in a few discussion over this and its the ignorant that usually want to keep them.....but I do agree completely about ignorance.

    In one discussion I had to tell one supporter that the confederates were from the south. Another I had to tell that General Lee fought for the confederacy......and another that he was dead. Another person said that the monuments were object of worship and veneration and as religious artifacts could not be removed.

    I've also found that Lee didn't really deserve all this deification.....he wasn't very good......Jackson was by far the better general. I'm not sure why his troops shot him though. I think its possible he was just collateral damage while they were aiming at one of his staff officers.

    Once I was called a yankee and a race traitor when I was trying to help I pretty much figured I'd let the idiots try and keep them......I no longer care if the lost cause monuments are taken down or not.
     
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  8. Kchoo

    Kchoo At Peace.

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    I don’t think the only thing they represent is a lost cause, but since that is all that people want to apply to it today, then that also shows a level of ignorance.
     
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  9. Shadowprophet

    Shadowprophet Truthiness

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    Hmm, I have to say, I disagree with its usually ignorant people that want to keep monuments from the past, Why don't we just jerk the statue of liberty down while we are at it?

    This is one of those rare times when I'm just going to have to disagree with you, It's disrespectful to the past, Those Monuments were not erected by us, They are established by our ancestors, Why don't we just all Burn our grandparent's houses down after they pass away?

    I don't mean for this to sound snide at all, It's just, I can see clearly that we are on opposing viewpoints of this issue, Those who don't remember and respect the past are surely setting themselves up to repeat those same mistakes.

    We don't need the Mona Lisa or the Sistine Chapple Why don't we level it and put up a lemonade stand? Who gives others the rights to destroy their work? just because someone doesn't agree with something or doesn't like something. I think so and so wasn't such a great person, So let's vandalize his past and to straight hell with anyone else who could possibly disagree.

    You are an archaeologist, you are the very last person I would think would be consenting to destroy history. Whether people like it or not isn't the point, the point is, In three thousand years those works are gone, Have you no Artistic Love?
     
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  10. Kchoo

    Kchoo At Peace.

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    It has everything to do with erasing history, but very little to gain.

    BRINGING down monuments is THOUGHT TO BE a symbol of freedom by the ignorant, but it is spurred on by Anarchists using a false hope campaign. False hope if these statues are brought down, then everything will be made right.

    Anarchists want to see a cat fight between those that want to take them down and those that want to see them stay. And Anarchists are the creators of this movement. Anarchists are also the reason for backlash and anarchists are the reason for the taking knee at football games... the problem is, the blind uneducated masses on two sides want a fight, took the bait, and want to call each other the bad guy... and now they have a falsely spurred, but very real excuse to fight. And that is all it is.
     
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  11. Castle-Yankee54

    Castle-Yankee54 Celestial

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    Actually I'm a geologist......and its not destroying history as it will remain unchanged. But I have been involved in civil war battlefield archeology preserving portions of the field. I've also camped on several civil war battlefields in the past.

    In 3,000 years I'm sure if we are still around that people will remember that the confederacy was based on white superiority based on the premise that slavery was a natural and normal condition and that why they fought the war.

    Yes some of the monuments are very nice looking.....the artwork would do well in a museum where it can be properly contextualized.

    Texas recently changed a plaque in the state capitol to say the confederacy fought the war over the preservation of slavery.
     
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  12. Kchoo

    Kchoo At Peace.

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    The War was indeed fought over slavery, but if you say removing statues does not effect history, then statues are just statues, just as history is just history, thus removing them serves less purpose than letting them remain. Removing them is a false and gross statement for any American.

    The Biggest, Best Statue I know of tops them all, Liberty, next to that, Lincoln, but without the contrast of these against the confederate leaders, these icons lose some value in my humble opinion.

    Yes, it is erasing history. Because it removes icons to the overall big picture.
     
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  13. Shadowprophet

    Shadowprophet Truthiness

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    My thing is, I'm past disagreeing with people, It only breeds contempt, That's not something I'm looking for, but, Everything we do changes history, I feel like this has a political vibe to it rather than an appreciation for history or art.

    I flatly refuse to board some bandwagon that cropped up in a modern context because political views are so wishy-washy.

    You know, If everyone suddenly thought knocking over liquor stores was a great way to help alcoholics because it would put their sources out of business, Then all the follower sheep would be bombarding others about how we should all be out knocking over liquor stores. Politics and political views don't sway me, I Respect the Hours and weeks of work the artist put into the piece.

    My thing Is, I'm passionate about this viewpoint, But I'm not so much a fighter or person of discord, It's pointless to battle and argue when someone can just simply disagree and still respect one another, And that's where I am on this.

    I feel like this movement is a modernized politicized sheeple kind of thing, And It somewhat disgusts me that people just get behind things like this. Since when have these monuments been a problem?

    Since Recently... That's when. That's not good enough for me. It's a sheeple movement And I want no part of it.

    That being said, I respect your intelligence. I don't like disagreeing or discord on any level, I've become ned Flanders in my older age. :)
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2019
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  14. Castle-Yankee54

    Castle-Yankee54 Celestial

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    I do agree we are changing history.......but we are changing future history. History like science is constantly being updated and seldom sits still as new information is always coming to light.

    However, in this case the history has always been there and is just being recognized. The problem is caused by how much research people do or do they say I had a history class in high school and rely on that. In talking to the public at places like Antietam and Gettysburg you find many know very little about the battles.......but they want to learn. Unfortunately there will always be close minded and say this is how it happened and that's all there is to it. At that point I'd say sure and let them move on before I shake my head.

    Like I said Texas updated a plaque that was incorrect....which is a big step.

    I'm not sure who Ned Flanders is but I do prefer "disagreements" when two people remain civil. I appreciate where you are coming from as I used to feel the same way.

    Just so you know I'm all for honoring the bravery and sacrifice of both sides in the war......as they should be remembered. However I'm not going to condone the confederate cause of fighting to preserve slavery in a government based on white supremacy.
     
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  15. Shadowprophet

    Shadowprophet Truthiness

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    Slavery is a whole other issue, I have opinions about that as well, OF course, I don't condone slavery. But the Very Word slavery in today's language is just an excuse to cause White Guilt. Slavery happened in every nation on the globe, It's still going on in China.

    Slavery Sucks but Making the concept of slavery A Black/White issue, is very uninformed, Black people owned slaves in America during the period. Did you know this? Slavery was not a White black issue, It was and always has been a Rich V.S poverty issue, and that's something a lot of people simply don't realize when they get all caught up in their racial crusades.
     
  16. Castle-Yankee54

    Castle-Yankee54 Celestial

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    Personally I'm not in it for white guilt.....just historical accuracy. I'm aware that slavery is still happening in places around the world.....and has been going on since civilization began. I'm also aware that there was slavery in the US long before it became a country.....but that's not the issue the use of chattel slavery in the confederacy is.

    I'm also aware that the Union's priority wasn't to free the slaves but to preserve the Union.....Lincoln said so himself. All I'm saying is the confederate cause was the preservation of slavery and I can't abide by that.

    I'm also aware that in the confederacy it was very much a rich mans war/poor mans fight situation......but that doesn't mean the poor didn't support the cause of slavery.

    All I'm saying is that since the confederacy fought to preserve slavery some monuments that support this cause should be corrected. Its also not exactly a new thing.....people have been upset with the state of Rhode Island as well as the $20 bill for years.
     
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  17. Shadowprophet

    Shadowprophet Truthiness

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    Don't get me wrong, Your allowed to have any opinion you want and follow any political view you want and you don't have to explain it to anyone. I'm not arguing my point to try to change your mind, I respect your opinion, I'm only expressing why I think the way I do is all :)
     
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  18. Castle-Yankee54

    Castle-Yankee54 Celestial

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    Personally its not even political for me......its simply observations based on what I've read over the years. I'm also not trying to change your position......I'm just telling you mine.

    Are you familiar with the Battle of Antietam?
     
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  19. Shadowprophet

    Shadowprophet Truthiness

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    I could pretend that I was, But I wasn't until you brought it up, I'm reading up on it now, Battle of Antietam - Wikipedia

    I'll be back to comment on it in the morning, It's late and Sam just got in, I've got to cook some dinner and maybe get some sleep, But I will be back in the morning with thoughts on this, After I study it for a while :)
     
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  20. Castle-Yankee54

    Castle-Yankee54 Celestial

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    Fair enough......have a good night.

    I was going to ask you a question not so much on the battle but instead what you thought of a statement.

    We can continue tomorrow.
     
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