Strange & Bizarre News

nivek

As Above So Below

Mystery behind an abandoned Boeing 737 that was found sitting in the middle of a field in Bali - and NO ONE is sure how it got there

Mystery as Boeing 737 surfaces in Bali near Pandama Beach

An abandoned Boeing 737 is parked in the middle of a field in Bali, with many travellers scratching their heads about where it came from. The large plane sits in a limestone quarry near the Raya
Nusa Dua Selatan Highway, not far from the Pandawa beach - a tourist hub.

Some Balinese have suggested the plane was dumped there by an ambitious entrepreneur keen to get a restaurant up and running inside it. The plane sits with runway stairs seen propped up against the front entrance.




The aircraft has become a tourist attraction with a travel guide saying it is hard to spot and is next to a collection of shipping containers. It's not the only retired Boeing 737 on the island, as other disused planes have been spotted in other parts, some used as tourist attractions.

One of them rests right next to nearby Dunkin Donuts, with its wing resting on the diner's wall. People also do not know how it got there. Some guessed that jet, which has no engines, was another abandoned restaurant idea or had planned to be used as a home.

It is thought to have been there since 2007 and was used as an event venue in 2018. One other retired jet was seen on top of a cliff at Nyang-Nyang beach in 2021, as a tourist attraction and had plans to be turned into a villa.


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nivek

As Above So Below

Ontario woman scammed out of $11,000 by Texas psychic she met on TikTok

An Ontario woman says she was scammed out of $11,000 after months spent working with a Texas psychic she met on TikTok following the death of her stepfather.

The 21-year-old from Toronto named Marie, who asked only to be identified by her first name, said she was seeking spiritual healing and guidance on what to do with the inheritance her stepfather left her when she connected with the psychic.

“She was like, yeah, there's so much negativity around you. I’m seeing 666, so we have to turn it into 999 and that's where she got the $9,000 from."

Marie said the psychic readings cost about $20 in the beginning, but they quickly escalated to hundreds of dollars each session and more over the next two months.

“Every time she would do a reading the price would go up. She would say I need more money to get rid of all this negativity, like I need to fix you,” said Marie.

Marie ended up sending about $11,000, in part because the psychic said she needed to remove negativity from the money and once it was removed she would send all the funds back, but she never did.

“It makes me angry because I put my trust into someone and how can I be so dumb to trust a complete stranger and give them everything that my stepdad left for me,” said Marie.

The Better Business Bureau (BBB) has seen an increase in psychic scams and Jessie St-Cyr with the BBB said more psychic mediums are reaching out to young people using social media platforms.

"Just be mindful there are a lot of fake psychic mediums on TikTok and Instagram as well," said St-Cyr.

(More on the link)

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pigfarmer

tall, thin, irritable

Ontario woman scammed out of $11,000 by Texas psychic she met on TikTok

An Ontario woman says she was scammed out of $11,000 after months spent working with a Texas psychic she met on TikTok following the death of her stepfather.

The 21-year-old from Toronto named Marie, who asked only to be identified by her first name, said she was seeking spiritual healing and guidance on what to do with the inheritance her stepfather left her when she connected with the psychic.

“She was like, yeah, there's so much negativity around you. I’m seeing 666, so we have to turn it into 999 and that's where she got the $9,000 from."

Marie said the psychic readings cost about $20 in the beginning, but they quickly escalated to hundreds of dollars each session and more over the next two months.

“Every time she would do a reading the price would go up. She would say I need more money to get rid of all this negativity, like I need to fix you,” said Marie.

Marie ended up sending about $11,000, in part because the psychic said she needed to remove negativity from the money and once it was removed she would send all the funds back, but she never did.

“It makes me angry because I put my trust into someone and how can I be so dumb to trust a complete stranger and give them everything that my stepdad left for me,” said Marie.

The Better Business Bureau (BBB) has seen an increase in psychic scams and Jessie St-Cyr with the BBB said more psychic mediums are reaching out to young people using social media platforms.

"Just be mindful there are a lot of fake psychic mediums on TikTok and Instagram as well," said St-Cyr.

(More on the link)


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seems more like a tax on stupidity to me.
 

nivek

As Above So Below


Feathers Fly As Wild Turkey Dodges Cops In Slapstick Apartment Chase

A Wisconsin police department struggled to find a way to nab a wild turkey after the bird broke into an apartment last week.
On Friday, Wausau police officers received a report of a wild turkey on the loose inside a second floor apartment and responded by trying to wrestle the bird as it flew between rooms, (the) video shows.

“It really underscores the unpredictable nature of the job, that our officers are asked to do at any given time,” Wausau Police Department Patrol Captain Todd Baeten said. After hyping themselves up, the officers walked into the apartment wearing protective gloves. One carried a net. But each time they came close, the turkey proceeded to fly or race away.

“We needed two of these, Brady,” one officer told another as the turkey fled into the kitchen. Doris Madden, who lives in Wausau’s City Walk Apartments, said she noticed the apartment’s broken window and had no idea what caused it, WSAW-TV reported. She called the apartment manager, who discovered the turkey.

“I think it’s kind of funny. I’m just glad it wasn’t my apartment,” Madden told the station. The turkey was later released.


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nivek

As Above So Below

Woman swindles mother out of $139 million in art masterpieces in bizarre con involving a "psychic," police say

Police in Rio de Janeiro on Wednesday were seeking the arrest of six people accused of involvement in stealing 16 artworks together valued at more than 700 million reais ($139 million), some of which were recovered.

Police said in a statement that the group stole the works from an 82-year-old widow, who had been married to an art collector and dealer.


Brazil Stolen Art
In this photo officers show artist Tarsila do Amaral's painting titled "Sol Poente"


The haul included museum-quality pieces from Brazilian masters Tarsila do Amaral and Emiliano Di Cavalcanti. Video provided by police showed them finding more than 10 works underneath a bed and, at the bottom of the pile, was "Sol Poente" — a do Amaral painting of a brilliant-hued sunset. "Wow! Look who's here!" one officer exclaimed as she removed bubble wrap from the work. "Oh, little beauty. Glory!"

The stolen artwork also included works by renowned Brazilian artists like Cicero Dias, Rubens Gerchman and Alberto Guignard, AFP reported.

The theft was orchestrated by the widow's daughter, according to the statement, which didn't provide either of their names. The daughter was among those arrested Wednesday, according to local media, which also showed images of a woman attempting to escape through a window as police arrived.

The paintings weren't stolen in a heist, but rather through a bizarre con. In January 2020, a self-proclaimed "psychic" approached the widow in the Copacabana neighborhood and informed her that her daughter was sick and soon to die, according to the police statement.

The elderly woman was "convinced to pay exorbitant amounts for the spiritual treatment of her daughter," police said.

The widow, who holds mystical beliefs, was compelled to make bank transfers totaling 5 million reais over the course of two weeks for supposed spiritual treatment. Her daughter, who encouraged the payments, proceeded to fire domestic employees so her accomplices could enter the residence unimpeded and remove the artworks. Upon receiving threats from her daughter and the accomplices, the widow made additional bank transfers.

Three of the artworks, collectively worth more than 300 million reais, were recovered in an art gallery in Sao Paulo. The gallery's owner told police he had purchased them directly from the widow's daughter, and sold two others to the Museum of Latin American Art in Buenos Aires, according to the statement.

A press officer for the world-renowned museum told The Associated Press that its founder, Eduardo Costantini, purchased the works for his personal collection, and possible display at the museum in the future. The museum identified the widow as Genevieve Boghici and said Costantini has maintained direct contact with her throughout the acquisition of the paintings and since.


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pigfarmer

tall, thin, irritable

Woman swindles mother out of $139 million in art masterpieces in bizarre con involving a "psychic," police say

Police in Rio de Janeiro on Wednesday were seeking the arrest of six people accused of involvement in stealing 16 artworks together valued at more than 700 million reais ($139 million), some of which were recovered.

Police said in a statement that the group stole the works from an 82-year-old widow, who had been married to an art collector and dealer.


Brazil Stolen Art
In this photo officers show artist Tarsila do Amaral's painting titled "Sol Poente"


The haul included museum-quality pieces from Brazilian masters Tarsila do Amaral and Emiliano Di Cavalcanti. Video provided by police showed them finding more than 10 works underneath a bed and, at the bottom of the pile, was "Sol Poente" — a do Amaral painting of a brilliant-hued sunset. "Wow! Look who's here!" one officer exclaimed as she removed bubble wrap from the work. "Oh, little beauty. Glory!"

The stolen artwork also included works by renowned Brazilian artists like Cicero Dias, Rubens Gerchman and Alberto Guignard, AFP reported.

The theft was orchestrated by the widow's daughter, according to the statement, which didn't provide either of their names. The daughter was among those arrested Wednesday, according to local media, which also showed images of a woman attempting to escape through a window as police arrived.

The paintings weren't stolen in a heist, but rather through a bizarre con. In January 2020, a self-proclaimed "psychic" approached the widow in the Copacabana neighborhood and informed her that her daughter was sick and soon to die, according to the police statement.

The elderly woman was "convinced to pay exorbitant amounts for the spiritual treatment of her daughter," police said.

The widow, who holds mystical beliefs, was compelled to make bank transfers totaling 5 million reais over the course of two weeks for supposed spiritual treatment. Her daughter, who encouraged the payments, proceeded to fire domestic employees so her accomplices could enter the residence unimpeded and remove the artworks. Upon receiving threats from her daughter and the accomplices, the widow made additional bank transfers.

Three of the artworks, collectively worth more than 300 million reais, were recovered in an art gallery in Sao Paulo. The gallery's owner told police he had purchased them directly from the widow's daughter, and sold two others to the Museum of Latin American Art in Buenos Aires, according to the statement.

A press officer for the world-renowned museum told The Associated Press that its founder, Eduardo Costantini, purchased the works for his personal collection, and possible display at the museum in the future. The museum identified the widow as Genevieve Boghici and said Costantini has maintained direct contact with her throughout the acquisition of the paintings and since.


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swine.

no proper like or thanks button for that one maybe a WTF one ?
 

pigfarmer

tall, thin, irritable
Moon landing conspiracy theorists say this photo is new ‘hoax’ proof

Moon landing conspiracy theorists say this photo is new ‘hoax’ proof​

By
Brooke Kato
August 16, 2022

Was the giant leap for mankind really just a giant lie?

Conspiracy theorists think so.

The theory that the Apollo 11 moon landing was a hoax by the US government lives on, despite video and photo evidence of Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong planting the country’s flag in space.

While conspiracy theorists believe it would have been cheaper and easier to fake the landing than to really achieve it, there have been six manned moon landings, which took place from 1969 to 1972.

Despite theories circulating about the first landing being fabricated, the others have not been exempt from disbelievers.

In fact, the same theorists believe they’ve spotted an odd figure in the visor of one of the astronauts in a clip of the 1972 Apollo 17 mission.

The Apollo 17 moon landing isn't safe from conspiracy theorists, as one claims a strange figure appears in an astronaut's visor. The Apollo 17 moon landing isn’t safe from conspiracy theorists, as one claims a strange figure appears in an astronaut’s visor.YouTube/Streetcap1 Leery observers are questioning the reflection of a mysterious figure. Leery observers are questioning the reflection of a mysterious figure.YouTube/Streetcap1 DECEMBER 12:  Apollo 17  commander Eugene A. Cernan stands by the American flag during his second space walk becoming the last man to walk on the Moon on December 12, 1972. The moon landings have been criticized by conspiracy theorists as fabricated, despite those claims being debunked. Getty Images
Marking the last manned trip to the moon, the astronauts on board — commander Gene Cernan, lunar module pilot Harrison “Jack” Schmitt and command module pilot Ronald Evans — were the final people to touch down.

In a video titled “Reflection in a Visor. Where’s the reflection of the camera taking the photo?” user Streetcap1 claims the shot has evidence of illegitimacy as he narrates his findings in the clip, which was posted in 2017.

The YouTuber claims a reflection in the visor of one of the astronauts shows a “stagehand” — and, allegedly, the person is not wearing a spacesuit, furthering claims of fabrication.

Astronaut on the moon Citing this image, the YouTuber zoomed in on the astronaut’s visor, pointing to a figure that didn’t seem to fit the scene.YouTube/Streetcap1
“You can see some sort of, it looks like a man, back in the early ’70s, long hair, wearing some sort of waistcoat-type thing… and a shadow of that figure, presumably,” the narrator claimed, using his mouse to outline the figure as he talks.

“Where’s this guy’s space suit?” he continued later in the clip, which has been viewed more than 2.8 million times.

But not everyone in the comments was convinced of the YouTuber’s supposed discovery.

Astronaut on the moon For decades, conspiracy theorists have continued to claim that the landings were a hoax.Getty Images
“The curvature of the astronaut’s visor causes a fish-eye lens effect. Just Google ‘fish eye lens pics’ and you will see how distorted they are. When you look at the shadow you can clearly see the boxy shape of his life support system,” argued one user in the comments.

“To me it clearly looks like another astronaut with the white, bulky spacesuit. you can see that he has both arms slightly stretched forward and the shadow shows the bulkyness of the spacesuit, including the life support on his back,” another commented.

“I’ve always thought it was a hoax since we didn’t go back in modern times,” claimed someone else.

Cernan welcomed back to earth in the Pacific Ocean by Navy Pararescueman Theorists don’t believe Cernan (right) touched down on the moon.Getty Images
Nonbelievers of the Apollo missions claim the US government fabricated each intergalactic journey in order to beat the rest of the world to the moon and win the “space race.”

Despite being widely debunked, many theorists continue to perpetuate even the wildest of claims.

Some say the flag was rippling in the wind, but NASA created a special flag to use in space since there would be no wind to keep the flag upright, which would have made an unflattering photo. Meanwhile, others ground their disbelief in the fact that stars aren’t visible or that shadows don’t seem to align with light sources.
 

wwkirk

Celestial
Moon landing conspiracy theorists say this photo is new ‘hoax’ proof

Moon landing conspiracy theorists say this photo is new ‘hoax’ proof​

By
Brooke Kato
August 16, 2022

Was the giant leap for mankind really just a giant lie?

Conspiracy theorists think so.

The theory that the Apollo 11 moon landing was a hoax by the US government lives on, despite video and photo evidence of Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong planting the country’s flag in space.

While conspiracy theorists believe it would have been cheaper and easier to fake the landing than to really achieve it, there have been six manned moon landings, which took place from 1969 to 1972.

Despite theories circulating about the first landing being fabricated, the others have not been exempt from disbelievers.

In fact, the same theorists believe they’ve spotted an odd figure in the visor of one of the astronauts in a clip of the 1972 Apollo 17 mission.

The Apollo 17 moon landing isn't safe from conspiracy theorists, as one claims a strange figure appears in an astronaut's visor.'t safe from conspiracy theorists, as one claims a strange figure appears in an astronaut's visor. The Apollo 17 moon landing isn’t safe from conspiracy theorists, as one claims a strange figure appears in an astronaut’s visor.YouTube/Streetcap1 Leery observers are questioning the reflection of a mysterious figure. Leery observers are questioning the reflection of a mysterious figure.YouTube/Streetcap1 DECEMBER 12:  Apollo 17  commander Eugene A. Cernan stands by the American flag during his second space walk becoming the last man to walk on the Moon on December 12, 1972. The moon landings have been criticized by conspiracy theorists as fabricated, despite those claims being debunked. Getty Images
Marking the last manned trip to the moon, the astronauts on board — commander Gene Cernan, lunar module pilot Harrison “Jack” Schmitt and command module pilot Ronald Evans — were the final people to touch down.

In a video titled “Reflection in a Visor. Where’s the reflection of the camera taking the photo?” user Streetcap1 claims the shot has evidence of illegitimacy as he narrates his findings in the clip, which was posted in 2017.

The YouTuber claims a reflection in the visor of one of the astronauts shows a “stagehand” — and, allegedly, the person is not wearing a spacesuit, furthering claims of fabrication.

Astronaut on the moon Citing this image, the YouTuber zoomed in on the astronaut’s visor, pointing to a figure that didn’t seem to fit the scene.YouTube/Streetcap1
“You can see some sort of, it looks like a man, back in the early ’70s, long hair, wearing some sort of waistcoat-type thing… and a shadow of that figure, presumably,” the narrator claimed, using his mouse to outline the figure as he talks.

“Where’s this guy’s space suit?” he continued later in the clip, which has been viewed more than 2.8 million times.

But not everyone in the comments was convinced of the YouTuber’s supposed discovery.

Astronaut on the moon For decades, conspiracy theorists have continued to claim that the landings were a hoax.Getty Images
“The curvature of the astronaut’s visor causes a fish-eye lens effect. Just Google ‘fish eye lens pics’ and you will see how distorted they are. When you look at the shadow you can clearly see the boxy shape of his life support system,” argued one user in the comments.

“To me it clearly looks like another astronaut with the white, bulky spacesuit. you can see that he has both arms slightly stretched forward and the shadow shows the bulkyness of the spacesuit, including the life support on his back,” another commented.

“I’ve always thought it was a hoax since we didn’t go back in modern times,” claimed someone else.

Cernan welcomed back to earth in the Pacific Ocean by Navy Pararescueman Theorists don’t believe Cernan (right) touched down on the moon.Getty Images
Nonbelievers of the Apollo missions claim the US government fabricated each intergalactic journey in order to beat the rest of the world to the moon and win the “space race.”

Despite being widely debunked, many theorists continue to perpetuate even the wildest of claims.

Some say the flag was rippling in the wind, but NASA created a special flag to use in space since there would be no wind to keep the flag upright, which would have made an unflattering photo. Meanwhile, others ground their disbelief in the fact that stars aren’t visible or that shadows don’t seem to align with light sources.

Does anyone know what the Moon Hoax Proponents are currently saying about the possibility of going to the Moon? Are they saying that while going to the Moon is possible now, the original landing was faked? Or are they insisting that travel to the Moon is physically impossible for humans? If it's the latter, then they are somewhat similar to Flat Earthers.
 

AD1184

Celestial
Does anyone know what the Moon Hoax Proponents are currently saying about the possibility of going to the Moon? Are they saying that while going to the Moon is possible now, the original landing was faked? Or are they insisting that travel to the Moon is physically impossible for humans? If it's the latter, then they are somewhat similar to Flat Earthers.
There are different flavours of moon hoax theorist.
 

nivek

As Above So Below

Eating roasted puppy stuffed with snails and sage, and grinding baked owl into powder: Thousands of bizarre medieval recipes for treating ailments including gout will be digitised for the first time

The treatment involving the owl (shown left) would have also seen the bird get covered in salt, before its ground down remains were mixed with fat from a boar. The mixture would then have been applied to the sufferer's body in the hope that it would cure gout. The treatment is one of more than 180 medieval manuscripts that are to be digitised, catalogued and conserved over the next two years as part of the Curious Cures in Cambridge Libraries project. The manuscripts, containing around 8,000 unedited medical recipes, mostly date from the 14th or 15th centuries, with some examples from earlier, the oldest being 1,000 years old. Another unusual recipe, also intended to tackle gout, instructed readers to stuff a puppy with snails and sage royal then roast it over a fire, with the rendered fat used to make a salve. Also pictured: A digitised diagram (left) showing a naked man and the veins that could be opened for blood-letting, which was then a common treatment; drawings of urine flasks (inset) illustrating the different colours of a patient's urine.

Thousands of bizarre medieval recipes for treating ailments including gout to be digitised
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AD1184

Celestial
There are different flavours of moon hoax theorist.
By necessity, all flat-earthers are moon hoax believers who believe that space travel is impossible. Some others think that travel to the moon is possible, but not with current technology. Some others probably think that it is possible with today's technology, but not the technology of the late 1960s. Some think that moon missions did take place, but the publicly released documentary record is a hoax.
 

pigfarmer

tall, thin, irritable
New Titanic wreckage revealed in ‘exciting,’ never-before-seen video

New Titanic wreckage revealed in ‘exciting,’ never-before-seen video

By
Jack Hobbs
August 31, 2022 4:57pm

The research will go on.

A new, high-resolution video of the Titanic wreckage was released Tuesday showing the sunken vessel shot in 8K resolution for the first time since it sank 110 years ago.

The clip — released by OceanGate Expeditions — shows the hull of the sunken vessel and some brand-new features and “extraordinary” detail, according to a press release.

In 1912, the infamous RMS Titanic took her maiden voyage across the Atlantic Ocean towards New York City with 2,200 passengers struck an iceberg and subsequently sank with only 712 people surviving.

Longtime Titanic expert and diver Roy Golden said that with the footage — which is about a minute in length — he managed to glimpse previously unseen details of the ship.



“For example, I had never seen the name of the anchor maker, Noah Hingley & Sons Ltd., on the port-side anchor,” Golden said in the press release.

“I’ve been studying the wreck for decades and have completed multiple dives, and I can’t recall seeing any other image showing this level of detail.”
titanic-8k-002.jpg

titanic-8k-003.jpg

In the eerie video — which was released on Youtube — viewers can see the “renowned bow, the port-side anchor, hull number one, an enormous anchor chain — each link weighs approximately 200 pounds — the number one cargo hold, and solid bronze capstans.”

The video also shows the dramatic decay of the ship and where several rails have collapsed and drifted away from the vessel.

OceanGate also announced that the use of the high-def footage will be used to monitor the vessel’s decay from now on.

titanic-8k-004.jpg

titanic-8k-005.jpg

“With the help of scientists, the video will also support identification of species that are observed on and around the Titanic, and archaeologists will be able to document elements of the wreck and debris field in greater detail,” said the group.

“It is exciting that, after so many years, we may have discovered a new detail that wasn’t as obvious with previous generations of camera technologies,” Golden weighed in.
titanic-8k-featured.jpg

The ship’s demise was the inspiration for the 1997 film “Titanic” starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet.

“It was the biggest ship in history, filled with celebrities of that time,” the film’s 68-year-old director James Cameron told People on the 110th anniversary of the sinking earlier this year.

“It would be like if you took a jumbo jet filled with half the stars in Hollywood and crashed it into the Washington Monument.”
 
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