the 2020 election

Discussion in 'Present & Current Events' started by The shadow, Jan 2, 2020.

  1. AlienView

    AlienView Honorable

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    454
    I always liked his style - not putting up with the BS every politician faces from detractors
    - some of which deserve what Tump hurls back at them.

    So a Don Rickles maybe - but much as I no longer support his right wing conservative policies,
    some of which are costing me money, Trump is still not a Hitler.

    On the other hand the wolf in the Hen house {Michael Bloomberg pretending to be a Democrat],
    is exactly that - A wanna be Hitler bent on world control. Bloomberg saying he is going to save us
    from Trump is similar to Hitler saying he was going to save the world from the Jews
    - Ironic isn't it ?
     
  2. Thomas R. Morrison

    Thomas R. Morrison Administrator

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    Bernie's winning the primaries, but the #FakeCandidate Buttigieg is garnering enough electronically rigged votes to prevent Sanders from getting the 1,991 delegates that he needs in order to win the nomination without a second ballot, so the totally corrupt superdelegates will once again select the pro-corporate nominee like they did back in 2016, assuring another Trump victory.
     
  3. pigfarmer

    pigfarmer tall, thin, irritable

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    Easy there, I know that and what I'm getting at has nothing to do with Jews.
    Well actually, that is something Bernie would like to keep as under-mentioned as possible but that's a different story.

    What I am talking about is how DT can really whip a crowd up and it sits right on the edge of ... something. In another venue that kind of energy could take a bad turn. Like if he pointed a sword and yelled 'charge' people would run out and assault the breastworks. At least they're not running out to riot and destroy other people's property in protest, which seems to be perfectly OK if you're a DT hater.

    I couldn't catch much of Bernie last night but I heard it in the background for a little while. It would be very interesting if some sort of chart could be developed to illustrate the speech patterns, the tone, the cadence.

    A DT chart would be all over the place and look like it came out of a seismograph. Last night listening to BS I heard something much more linear; like a connect-the-dots depiction of a straight line. Not intended as a criticism just and observation.

    'speak speak speak emotional point [reaction]' Lather, rinse, repeat.
    It's working for him though and a hell of a lot of other people too.

    Both Bernie and DT have managed to put their fingers on how to communicate, to get to the crowd on a visceral level in a way the other candidates just don't. I really really really hope Bernie gets it because I look forward to the debates.

     
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  4. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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  5. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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  6. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    Ha I remember that movie when I was very young lol, never saw it again referenced or otherwise til now...

    ...
     
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  7. The shadow

    The shadow The shadow knows!

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    RealClearPolitics - Election 2020 — Democratic Delegate Count
    going into south Carolina Boden has 6 delegates. Bloomberg none.
    I see no real way Bloomberg will get any delegates in south Carolina.
    Super Tuesday looks bleak for everyone except sanders. I see no real way forward for Any candidate outside the top 3 even Warren looks like she is done.
    I expect After super Tuesday an exodus from the race.
    Sanders Biden maybe 2 more will be left afterwards.
    If Biden loses South Carolina it's over for him..
     
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  8. wwkirk

    wwkirk Celestial

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  9. The shadow

    The shadow The shadow knows!

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  10. Sheltie

    Sheltie good to the last drop

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  11. The shadow

    The shadow The shadow knows!

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  12. The shadow

    The shadow The shadow knows!

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  13. The shadow

    The shadow The shadow knows!

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  14. pigfarmer

    pigfarmer tall, thin, irritable

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    I actually wish the Russians would interfere - at least there would be an excuse for this train wreck.
    [​IMG]

    I can't imagine that pushing Joe Biden to the front is going to end well. He's slipping gears visibly.
     
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  15. wwkirk

    wwkirk Celestial

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    Bloomberg's out
    WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. — Michael R. Bloomberg dropped out of the presidential race on Wednesday, just over three months after he began a campaign that was fueled by his vast fortune and quickly grew to a sprawling political operation but failed to win the groundswell of moderate support he had sought. Mr. Bloomberg endorsed former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., saying that he had the best shot to beat President Trump.

    After staking his candidacy on doing well on Super Tuesday, he did not collect on his grand bet, winning only American Samoa.

    He made the announcement after falling short in his quest to poach enough center-left voters from Mr. Biden, who carried North Carolina, Virginia and other states across the South on Super Tuesday and won a decisive victory last weekend in South Carolina.

    In an unprecedented effort to self-finance a presidential campaign — which some rivals derided as an attempt to buy the White House — Mr. Bloomberg’s bid cost him more than half a billion dollars in advertising alone. He also spent lavishly on robust on-the-ground operations, with more than 200 field offices across the country and thousands of paid staff. His operation dwarfed those of Democratic rivals who ultimately won states in which he had installed many dozens of employees and spent heavily on radio, television and direct mail ads.

    Mr. Bloomberg, the former mayor of New York City, exited the race as the Democratic establishment began to converge around Mr. Biden — the very scenario he had judged unlikely when he declared his candidacy in late November. As some of Mr. Biden’s onetime opponents, including Pete Buttigieg, the former mayor of South Bend, Ind., and Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota, endorsed him this week, Mr. Bloomberg’s hopes of capturing the support he needed quickly evaporated.

    He was not helped by two deeply unimpressive debate performances, during which Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts led an onslaught of attacks on his record and past statements. Mr. Bloomberg had difficulty countering criticism that could threaten him in a Democratic primary, on issues including his support for the discriminatory stop-and-frisk policing tactic and his treatment of women in the workplace.

    While Mr. Bloomberg’s departure from the race was meant to help unite the Democratic Party — and avoid splintering moderate or independent voters by drawing them away from Mr. Biden — Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont remained a strong contender in the race and was on track to capture a sizable number of delegates in Tuesday’s contests.

    Over the course of his campaign, Mr. Bloomberg had argued against the danger of not just the re-election of President Trump but also the nomination of Mr. Sanders, whom he called incapable of defeating the president. “I don’t think the country wants revolutionary change,” he said this week. “I think the country wants evolutionary change, and Sanders is a very revolutionary kind of guy.”

    Mr. Bloomberg spent Super Tuesday in Florida, which will hold its primary on March 17. He acknowledged there that he might not win any states that day and that his only path to the nomination could be through a contested convention.

    “I don’t think I can win any other way,” he said at his campaign office in Miami’s Little Havana neighborhood. He was irked by repeated questions about how long he would stay in the race, and whether doing so would benefit Mr. Sanders at the expense of Mr. Biden.

    “Joe’s taking votes away from me,” Mr. Bloomberg said, insisting that he had no plans to drop out. “Have you asked Joe whether he’s going to drop out?”

    He visited Orlando, where he opened a campaign office and commemorated the victims of the 2016 Pulse nightclub shooting. Then, in what would be his final campaign event, he rallied supporters on Tuesday night in West Palm Beach, promising to compete in upcoming battleground states.

    “This is a campaign for change — a campaign for sanity, for honesty, a campaign for inclusion, compassion, for competence, and a campaign for human decency,” he said. “And this is a campaign to bring our country back together and put the ‘United’ back in the United States of America.”

    Even as he took himself out of the running, Mr. Bloomberg is likely to remain influential in the 2020 presidential election, having pledged to continue to pour resources into the Democratic effort to unseat Mr. Trump and deploy his main field offices in support of the nominee.

    He had pitched himself to voters as “the un-Trump,” often describing himself as “a sane, competent person,” while acknowledging what he called “the elephant in the room” — that a Bloomberg-Trump general election would feature “two New York billionaires” who have played golf together in the past.

    “He’s a climate denier, I’m an engineer,” Mr. Bloomberg said repeatedly at his rallies, trying to sharpen the contrasts between himself and the president. “He looks out for people who inherited their wealth, like him, while I’m self-made.”

    Along the way, he became a favorite target of Mr. Trump’s on Twitter, with the president posting about Mr. Bloomberg more than 20 times since he entered the race. “Only his highly paid consultants, who are laughing all the way to the bank, still support him,” Mr. Trump wrote this week.

    Mr. Bloomberg deployed his wealth to assemble an enormous campaign team of over 2,400 staff members spread across hundreds of offices. He concentrated more than 100 of those offices in Super Tuesday states, where his infrastructure quickly exceeded that of his opponents. For instance, in Ms. Warren’s home state of Massachusetts — where Mr. Bloomberg himself grew up — he established six field offices across the state, four more than Ms. Warren and five more than Mr. Biden, who ultimately won there.

    His campaign spent lavishly in other ways, paying staff members unprecedented salaries and seeking to woo voters with slick campaign events that featured swag (tote bags, water bottles, an array of T-shirts in all sizes), drinks (wine, beer, lemonade) and banquet-style food spreads (brisket, cheesesteaks, gourmet flatbread pizzas). They also leveraged the sophistication of Bloomberg LP’s data science, bringing to bear proprietary technology like an artificial intelligence program.

    But the very things Mr. Bloomberg called competitive advantages to his candidacy — his moderate politics and dual identity with both sides of the aisle — were also liabilities to his Democratic bid.

    Some Democrats attacked his former affiliation with the Republican Party, noting he had won election in New York City on the party’s ticket twice. Ms. Warren in particular took sharp aim at him — denouncing his history of demeaning comments about women, calling on him to release former employees from nondisclosure agreements, and criticizing his past support of Republican candidates like former Senator Scott Brown of Massachusetts, whom Ms. Warren unseated in a tight race in 2012.

    extensive philanthropic support of liberal causes — taking on issues like gun control and climate change — and his support of Democratic candidates. He pointed to the $100 million he had put toward helping the party take control of the House of Representatives in 2018.

    But many liberal voters didn’t find his philanthropy persuasive, and Mr. Bloomberg was dogged by criticism relating to past controversies as well as the notion that he was, as Mr. Sanders said, “buying the election.”

    Mr. Bloomberg argued that his fortune freed him to focus on issues rather than the horse-trading that can accompany fund-raising, and that his campaign was not beholden to anyone.

    “I’m not going to try to be somebody that I’m not,” he said this week before he dropped out of the race. “I can beat Donald Trump, and I don’t know that any of the others can."

    Patricia Mazzei reported from Miami and West Palm Beach, Fla., and Rebecca R. Ruiz and Jeremy W. Peters from New York.
     
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  16. pigfarmer

    pigfarmer tall, thin, irritable

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    I heard Joe was home listening to his record player when he got the news. That’s no malarkey
     
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  17. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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  18. pigfarmer

    pigfarmer tall, thin, irritable

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  19. AlienView

    AlienView Honorable

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    Do the Democrats think they can really beat Trump?

    Here is how they can:

    A Joe Biden / Bernie Sanders for President - That is the ticket that 'could' beat Trump.

    Biden is right - He is 'the Democrat' running for President
    - Bernie Sanders is a hybrid Socialist Democrat whose views remind me of the hippie era
    - Dreams and dreamers dreaming the impossible - But some dreams are possible.

    If Bernie admits that his extreme left wing views are not going to fly with enough people
    to win the Presidency.

    And Biden wants to unify the Democratic Party by allowing at least some of Bernie's ideas, even if
    modified somewhat to make them acceptable then..........

    With Biden at the top of the ticket and Bernie willing to accept the Vice Presidency
    - Trump very well might end up a one term President?!?!
     
  20. Standingstones

    Standingstones Celestial

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    Many voters are raising a cup to celebrate Mike Bloomberg dropping out of the presidential race.


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