The Divided State of Europe

nivek

As Above So Below
Europe’s energy agency warns of unprecedented crisis, inflation surges, consumer borrowing soars, mortgage approvals fall

The current energy crisis could be one of the worst and longest in history and European countries could be hit particularly hard, the head of the International Energy Agency, Fatih Birol, said on Tuesday.



In an interview with German magazine Der Spiegel, Birol said that the fallout from the events in Ukraine is likely to make the current energy crisis worse than the crises of the 1970s.

“Back then it was all about oil. Now we have an oil crisis, a gas crisis and an electricity crisis at the same time,” Birol told the publication, adding that before the ongoing events in Ukraine, Russia was “a cornerstone of the global energy system: the world’s largest oil exporter, the world’s largest gas exporter, a leading supplier of coal.”


As part of its Ukraine-related sanctions, the EU introduced restrictions on Russian fossil fuels and has pledged to gradually phase them out. Phase them out into what exactly? Experts have repeatedly said that there is no alternative to Russia’s supplies.

Birol warned that countries in Europe that are more dependent on Russian gas are facing a “difficult winter,” as “gas may well have to be rationed,” including in Germany. His comments came as Russia’s state gas supplier Gazprom cut off supplies to some energy firms in Germany, Denmark, the Netherlands and other countries, after their failure to pay for the fuel in rubles as per new requirements.

To try and mitigate the impact, EU states should procure as much additional gas as possible, for example pipeline gas from Norway or Azerbaijan, and LNG. According to Birol, coal-fired power plants could also partly replace gas-fired plants.

‘Partly’, which means that people will have ‘part’ of their usual energy supply. Moreover, as just one example, the UK doesn’t have the facilities to receive or store all of the expensive and unreliable shipments of US LNG.


The upcoming summer may be difficult as well in the EU and the US, due to the tight crude oil markets, Birol said. He warned that when the peak holiday season kicks off, fuel demand will increase, leading to “bottlenecks, for example with diesel, petrol or kerosene, especially in Europe.”

(More on the link)

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nivek

As Above So Below
How Italians deal with eco mob protesters: Furious motorists drag activists off the road to let traffic pass after they staged sit-in on one of Rome's busiest roads

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Demonstrating over environmental issues, the protesters sat across Rome's Raccordo - the city's main ring-road and one of its busiest - holding banners. A video shot from the side of the two-lane road showed the demonstration using road-block protest tactics also seen in Britain, causing a huge traffic jam to snake back as far as the eye could see, with no police officers or vehicles in sight. In response, irate Italian motorists at the front of the queue jumped out of their vehicles to take action while berating the protesters sitting on the tarmac. According to Italian publication Corriere Dello Sport, the young protesters were part of an Extinction Rebellion off-shoot called the 'Last Generation' campaign. The group is calling for the end of all fossil fuel extraction projects, and is demanding that Italy does not restart its coal plants - and instead develop more wind and solar energy sources. Britain has been grappling with similar protests in recent years, with Extinction Rebellion also wreaking havoc on public transport. Another group - Insulate Britain - have used the same road-block tactics as the activists in Italy.

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nivek

As Above So Below
Ukraine moves one step closer to EU membership

The European Commission has backed Ukraine's bid to be given candidacy status to join the EU - bringing it one step closer to joining the bloc.

"Good work has been done" by Ukraine, but more is needed, European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen said. Ukraine must make "important" reforms - on rule of law, oligarchs, human rights and tackling corruption, she added.

Candidacy status is a significant step to joining the EU. However, the whole process can take many years.

The recommendation from the European Commission still needs to be signed off by the EU's 27 member states, who meet to discuss it next week. The French, German and Italian leaders have already backed Ukraine's bid, but the decision must be unanimous.

Speaking from Brussels and wearing blue and yellow - the colours of Ukraine - Ms von der Leyen said Ukrainians were "ready to die" for the European perspective. "We want them to live with us in the European dream," she said, adding that Ukraine had shown its "aspiration and determination to live up to European values and standards".

But it is conditional - Ukraine has work to do, she said, to ensure international law is respected. Ukraine's President Volodymyr Zelensky tweeted that the "historic decision" would bring "victory closer".

The announcement comes a day after the leaders of France, Germany, Italy and Romania visited Kyiv and backed Ukraine's bid to join the EU - a big vote of confidence for Ukraine that today's decision was inevitable.

Meanwhile in Russia, the Kremlin has been watching Ukraine's efforts to join the EU very closely.

The development "requires our heightened attention, because we are all aware of the intensification of discussions in Europe on the subject of strengthening the defence component of the EU", Kremlin spokesperson Dmitry Peskov told reporters at his regular news briefing.

But Russian President Vladimir Putin suggested Russia would not oppose Ukraine's accession to the EU. "We have never been against it. We have always been against military utilisation of Ukraine territory. As regards economic integration, that is their choice," he told the St Petersburg economic forum.

(More on the link)

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nivek

As Above So Below
Migrants are piled up by a border fence surrounded by riot police in shocking scenes after more than 2,000 stormed fence to break into Spanish enclave bordering Morocco, killing 23



Moroccan authorities said 2,000 migrants tried to burst into Mililla, a Spanish territory in North Africa which is the one of the only EU land borders on the continent, on Friday. Authorities said some people trying to cross died in the crush, with others were seriously hurt as they fell while trying to scale fences at the border. Around 100 made it across the frontier, with the Spanish Government saying around 140 Spanish police officers were injured, as were 76 migrants. Now video released by the Moroccan Association for Human Rights (AMDH) shows what appears to be dozens of migrants, many motionless and apparently lifeless, piled up at the Barrio Chino Border Checkpoint. Omar Naji, local head of the AMDH said those in the pile had been left there for hours without medical treatment, leading to a higher death toll - which it claims is 29, higher than the total of 23 given by Moroccan authorities. Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez called the attempt to storm the border 'an attack on the territorial integrity of our country', and blamed it on people traffickers.

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nivek

As Above So Below
Several people are shot as 'man with automatic weapon' opens fire at Danish shopping mall: Terrified passers-by run for their lives as drama unfolds

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Police reinforcements have been deployed around Field's shopping centre between the city centre and the airport, advising people inside the mall to stay put and await police assistance. Copenhagen police wrote on Twitter: 'We're on the scene, shots were fired and several people have been hit.' Local media published images showing heavily armed police officers at the scene (bottom right), as well as people running out of the shopping centre (left, top right). British singer Harry Styles was due to perform at 8pm local team (6pm BST) at a concert venue less than a mile from the scene of the shooting. Police confirmed one person has been arrested in connection with the shootings but gave no other details.

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nivek

As Above So Below
'Six dead', eight injured and more missing in Italian Alps ice avalanche as shards of glacier cascade down mountainside just hours after temperatures hit new record high

At least six were killed and ten are still missing after shards of glacier ice careened down a mountain in the Italian Alps today. Dolomite summit Marmolada recorded a peak heat yesterday. An eyewitness said: 'We heard a very loud noise, then we saw the snow and ice avalanche.' Measuring 3,343m, Marmolada is the highest mountain in the Dolomites (pictured).

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nivek

As Above So Below
A lot of folks still don't realize that undercover cops and feds are often embedded in protests, either to monitor them or to stoke violence that can be used to justify a police crackdown… Hard time when they get caught.

 

nivek

As Above So Below
Sky News: ‘The Netherlands seems to be sliding into dictatorship under Prime Minister Mark Rutte as its national government has been “penetrated by globalist activists from the World Economic Forum…



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nivek

As Above So Below

Will the lights go out in Germany this winter? Merkel left her nation reliant on Putin's gas and now councils are turning off hot water and threatening floodlights at football stadiums... but ROBERT HARDMAN reveals many fear there's far worse to come


ROBERT HARDMAN: Will the lights go out in Germany this winter?

ROBERT HARDMAN: I have come to Germany to see how bad things are. Superficially, the situation appears calm on the German High Street. We are in what you might call the phoney war phase. Interestingly, Germany is suffering from exactly the same irritating problems besetting Britain. The next time a splenetic Europhile tries to blame all our woes on Brexit, point out that the queues at Hamburg airport security yesterday - snaking out of the terminals and down the spur road - were worse than anything at Heathrow or Gatwick. Point out that Germany now faces frequent shortages of commodities such as cooking oil, to the extent that one restaurant in Bavaria is now offering customers a litre of beer in exchange for a litre of oil. 'People think it's funny and are happy to bring their oil over,' says Erik Hoffmann, manager of Munich's Giesinger-Brau, who faces a schnitzel crisis because his 'suppliers can no longer get the oil'.

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nivek

As Above So Below

Italy's fascist party leader could become country's first female prime minister after current PM resigned

The leader of hard-right party Brothers of Italy has been tipped to become the nation's next prime minister amid a fresh wave of political chaos in the country. Firebrand Giorgia Meloni, whose party includes Il Duce's granddaughter as a councillor in Rome, is leading in the polls ahead of a likely snap election.

Ms Meloni, 45, has called for an election 'now' after incumbent PM Mario Draghi tabled his resignation, which was rejected by President Mattarella. Ex-cabinet minister Meloni became the youngest in Italian history when she served under Silvio Berlusconi.

She left his his centre-right grouping after three years.

Berlusconi's collapse and the sputtering of far-right rivals The League has seen Brothers of Italy surge in the polls - and rival current PM Mario Draghi's Democrats. Popular policies including a naval blockade of the North African coast to stop migrants reaching Italian shores.


(More on the link)

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nivek

As Above So Below

Russia threatens Swiss newspaper over Putin caricature

(Excerpt)

In a letter to NZZ editor Eric Gujer published on Saturday on the Russian Embassy in Switzerland’s press service website, it said it was “outraged” by publication of an “insulting caricature of the President of the Russian Federation” and reserved the right to take legal action for defamation and slander.

"We believe that freedom of expression is in no way compatible with the freedom to disseminate insults and fakes," the Russian embassy wrote.

The reason is reportedly an article in the NZZ edition of July 9 entitled "Superheroes and villains show their clout on the Internet", in which the paper looked at the propaganda war on social media by both sides that has been part of the Ukraine war on the ground. The article was accompanied by a photo of Putin with a red clown nose and rainbow streaks on his face that had originally been published on Twitter.

Swiss newspaper NZZ has not so far issued any comment.


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nivek

As Above So Below
They're playing mind games with people over this Climate Change. From climate change propaganda to Climate fear porn nowadays. It looks like Europe is exploding right now.

 

nivek

As Above So Below

EU 'punishing' British holidaymakers because of Brexit: Fury as UK tourists discover they must prove they can spend £85 a day to enter Spain and Germany joins France in blaming massive Channel delays on leaving the bloc

Spanish officials said the funds could be in the form of foreign currency, traveller's cheques, cash, payment letters or on credit cards. The rules came into force today due to the UK being considered a 'third country' outside the EU - although it remains to see whether they will be enforced in practice. It comes as Germany backed France in the escalating war of words over queues at Dover and Folkestone by insisting that 'Brexit reality' was to blame for the chaos that threatens to wreck the summer - despite British officials pointing to a lack of Gallic border guards.

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The new 100 euro-a- day post-Brexit spending rule that is infuriating Britons

What is the new diktat?

Visitors to Spain from outside the EU must now prove, if required, that they have the means to afford to be in Spain.

The minimum amount is 100 euros per person per day, with a minimum of 900 euros 'or its legal equivalent in foreign currency'.

How can the tourist prove they have the money?

The tourist must prove they have the money in cash, or by presenting certified travelers' cheques or credit cards.

These must be accompanied by the bank account's official statement or an updated bank book. Letters from banks or internet bank statements will not be accepted.

What happens if someone doesn't have the cash?

If they lack sufficient cash for the length of the trip, their entry into Spanish territory will be denied. They will be put on the earliest possible return flight.

Exceptionally, the officials responsible for entry control may allow entry, reducing the length of stay in proportion to the amount of cash available.

Is anyone exempt?

  • Anyone with residency in Spain or permission to study or work in Spain
  • Anyone holding a passport for a member state of the European Union or the Principality of Andorra
  • A foreign diplomat
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AD1184

Celestial

EU 'punishing' British holidaymakers because of Brexit: Fury as UK tourists discover they must prove they can spend £85 a day to enter Spain and Germany joins France in blaming massive Channel delays on leaving the bloc

Spanish officials said the funds could be in the form of foreign currency, traveller's cheques, cash, payment letters or on credit cards. The rules came into force today due to the UK being considered a 'third country' outside the EU - although it remains to see whether they will be enforced in practice. It comes as Germany backed France in the escalating war of words over queues at Dover and Folkestone by insisting that 'Brexit reality' was to blame for the chaos that threatens to wreck the summer - despite British officials pointing to a lack of Gallic border guards.

60715635-11050391-The_rule_which_has_taken_some_Brits_by_surprise_has_been_in_forc-m-15_1658848732340.jpg


The new 100 euro-a- day post-Brexit spending rule that is infuriating Britons

What is the new diktat?

Visitors to Spain from outside the EU must now prove, if required, that they have the means to afford to be in Spain.

The minimum amount is 100 euros per person per day, with a minimum of 900 euros 'or its legal equivalent in foreign currency'.

How can the tourist prove they have the money?

The tourist must prove they have the money in cash, or by presenting certified travelers' cheques or credit cards.

These must be accompanied by the bank account's official statement or an updated bank book. Letters from banks or internet bank statements will not be accepted.

What happens if someone doesn't have the cash?

If they lack sufficient cash for the length of the trip, their entry into Spanish territory will be denied. They will be put on the earliest possible return flight.

Exceptionally, the officials responsible for entry control may allow entry, reducing the length of stay in proportion to the amount of cash available.

Is anyone exempt?

  • Anyone with residency in Spain or permission to study or work in Spain
  • Anyone holding a passport for a member state of the European Union or the Principality of Andorra
  • A foreign diplomat
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I wouldn't bother to travel to Spain, then. They obviously do not want tourism money, if they expect every foreign visitor to hand over a written bank statement (I don't even get paper statements any more). A lot of European countries are putting up more and more barriers to visitors who come via legitimate means, but if you come illegally by dinghy, you have an absolute right to be there.
 

nivek

As Above So Below
I wouldn't bother to travel to Spain, then. They obviously do not want tourism money, if they expect every foreign visitor to hand over a written bank statement (I don't even get paper statements any more). A lot of European countries are putting up more and more barriers to visitors who come via legitimate means, but if you come illegally by dinghy, you have an absolute right to be there.

Yeah it's a ridiculous request of any legitimate visitor all the while illegal entries are accepted...I'd prefer to visit the UK rather than Spain, never been to either country...

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