To The Stars Academy: Investigating the Unexplained

Discussion in 'UFOs & Sightings' started by nivek, Feb 9, 2019.

  1. Thomas R. Morrison

    Thomas R. Morrison Meh

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    We humans engineer at the chemical level, so when we want to make some new metal alloy using tin, for example, we buy tin that's comprised of the naturally occurring distribution of the 10 stable isotopes of tin that we mine here on the Earth. So this is what we mean when we say that human technology is only using the 80 stable chemical elements - for the most part our technology is much too crude to care about the ratio of isotopes that occur naturally in the ore that we mine for industrial uses - we just exploit the bulk chemical properties of elements, not their isotopes. Obviously fission and fusion technology has been the exception to that rule.

    Vallee has talked in the past about a sample of material that was found to contain three different isotopes of one element...but those isotopes were perfectly distributed in thirds within that sample. That doesn't happen in nature, ever. So somebody made a material that required an even distribution of all three isotopes of one element, for reasons unknown to us. That indicates a technology which isn't just exploiting the chemical properties of the 80 chemical elements, as we humans do, but rather a technology that engineers with all 252+* stable isotopes of matter. That's what he's saying: somebody has a more nuanced and sophisticated materials science than we do, because we're only now beginning to see uses for isolating and choosing specific isotopes of the elements to achieve industrially useful effects.

    I hope that clears it up - I don't know how to say it more plainly than that.

    This is a classic example of confirmation bias. We can only speculate about the nature and function of extraterrestrial technology - you're drawing connections based on extremely tenuous data because you want the data to fit your explanation. You might be right, but you're jumping to all kinds of conclusions here. The color radiated by the materials may have (and probably do have) nothing to do with EM radiation being pumped into metamaterials - it could be an ionization effect, or a thermal effect, or something else entirely. This is why I always argue that arriving at a viable theory of operation is more useful than trying to work backwards in order to make sense of the data.

    It sounds like you're referring to these two papers:

    “Electromagnetic stress at the boundary: photon pressure or tension?” Shubo Wang, Jack Ng, Meng Xiao, and C. T. Chan, 2015
    https://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1510/1510.06227.pdf

    “Electromagnetic stress tensor for amorphous metamaterial medium,” Neng Wang, Shubo Wang, Jack Ng, 2018
    https://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1801/1801.00942.pdf

    Those papers show how it's theoretically possible to increase or decrease the mass of a metamaterial by engineering the EM stress-energy tensor equation of the material in a specific way. But the mass of such a material could never drop below zero in this manner because it appears to be impossible to drop the mass of any collection of positive matter below zero and thereby produce negative gravitation (as I understand it, the stress-energy tensor offers no solution where the stress, and momentum, and momentum flux, etc., terms can produce a negative value greater than the T^00 energy density term.

    Frankly, the more I've thought about it, the more relieved I am that we humans haven't figured out how to emulate AAV field propulsion technology yet. Given the known facts of military history and the current state of geopolitical tensions, I think that if we did know how to achieve gravitational field propulsion then there would be a >90% likelihood of an extinction-level global thermonuclear war within 25 years. So if somebody does figure out how to do it with achievable technology, I would beg them on my knees to stfu about it.

    * There are estimates of the number of stable isotopes varying from 252 to 256, which probably depend on your definition of "stable."
     
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  2. Dejan Corovic

    Dejan Corovic Celestial

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    That's spot on.

    My method is that of trial and error and I am not attached to any hypothesis at all. I'll drop it as soon as it proves wrong. I am simply following the data, and witness testimonials combined with present knowledge of physics points towards pumping hull with monochromatic laser-like light. Why, I don't know, I am searching for a clue in the scientific literature. That's very similar to what Dr. Alzofon's very reasonable theory was about and that's what Hutchinson claimed worked. Plus these two papers you found. As you say, there is a confirmation bias, but at least there is a large convergence of data from both witnesses and modern physics. I am much more inclined to assume that this problem needs hands-on approach, because even if one had the right theory everybody would ignore him because it's just on paper. That's why Dr. Tajmar is the guy to watch.

    A great example is how the transistor was discovered. A big company gave resources to two talented men and they started from a completely wrong hypotheses. After two years of dead ends, they finally stumbled on the right combination. And then their boss came in and tried to claim all the glory for himself :) (sad). But the essence is that these two guys narrowed it down into correct limited solution space. And that's how super-conductivity is studied for the last 20-30 years, just trial & error, very little theory.

    The problem with the theoretical approach is that when somebody finds the right theory, everybody else will laugh at him and call him a quack. John Stewart Bell's carrier was ruined by mediocrities. Boltzmann was driven to suicide by Mach. Even Paul Dirac didn't trust his own maths etc. Einstein had to wait five years and was really lucky that Eddington took up on himself to prove his theory. Proof is in the pudding. Nobody can laugh at a repeatable experiment.

    upload_2020-10-26_9-2-14.png

    One can't even count the number of times witnesses reported orange UFOs, but they were rarely photographed with great detail. Then in 1981 in Mexico, deep in pre-PhotoShop era, Carlos Diaz took many photos and videos of this UFO that repeatedly came to visit him in the village of Tepoztlan where he lived. All original images were analyzed by one US university and by a Hollywood special effects expert and they both agreed they can't find any tampering. Univesity guys said one very interesting thing, that the type of light was very specific, it was monochromatic, like lasers.

    It is an important clue, that UFOs which are moving vehicles, appear to have no windows. How can one drive around without being able to look at obstacles? What's a point of taking a trouble to travel for light years at a time to observe some astronomical wander, if one can't stick out a camera or instrument to take measurements? Even our own astronauts refused to fly in the Mercury capsule without windows and forced their hand one engineers to install few.

    This means that there is one overwhelming natural physical law that forces on alien engineers that UFO can't have windows (admittedly, except in a small number of cases). And that physics law is warp drive solution, because warp drive itself is a bubble and one can't have openings in the bubble or it will otherwise spontaneously rapture.

    Indeed, there is lots of tried and tested modern physics that dove tails into UFO witnesses observations. Without any hesitation one can actually say that UFO witnesses strictly talk no fantasies but talk electrodynamics and general relativity as if each one of them was a schooled GR physicist.
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2020
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  3. Dejan Corovic

    Dejan Corovic Celestial

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    One must say, that even Einstein when he wrote his General Relativity, didn't know whether he was right or wrong until experiments proved it. I read an article that went over all Einstein's errors during GR development. He and his assistants took the wrong turn at least 5 times. Judging him only by his errors one would think he was completely confused and disoriented.

    So I think when studying UFOs by following the convergence of data and modern physics can't hurt and it's really as good as it gets. But certainly not 100% safe. It will only be safe once we discover it and look back on it.
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2020
  4. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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  5. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    Chris Mellon and those videos

    Alejandro Rojas

    On 23 October 2020, Alejandro Rojas published an article written by himself, titled "How US Intelligence Community Insiders Got the Senate's Attention Regarding UFOs." Regarding the source of two USN UAP videos given to the New York Times for its November 2017 article, Christopher Mellon is cited as stating:

    "I received the videos. the now-famous videos in the Pentagon parking lot, from a Defense Department official. I still have the packaging."


    Now, that last bit of the statement is interesting, namely, that Christopher Mellon says "I still have the packaging." This is because on 7 August 2018 Twitter user @Jay09784691 posted several tweets about the existence of a number of images, which had been found on a US website belonging to Christopher Mellon. One of these was the image below:


    [​IMG]


    If this is the packaging referred to by Mellon, then can we glean anything further from the image? "Chris Mellon 16000 9/7/17" This is possibly the date and time when Mellon received the package, as this would be useful for creating a chain of custody of the material in the package.

    Another image from Mellon's website, is the following:

    [​IMG]

    This image appears to be a set of four DVD's lying on a package. Many in the UAP community have assumed these DVD's contained copies of the two videos. Note that the DVD's contain "Unclassified" material. The USN said at one stage that the videos were unclassified. There is also the number "9/5" which is probably 5th September, two days before the date on the Mellon package.

    Who is R. Essex?

    At about 22m20s In a YouTube video discussion dated September 2019, between Canadian researcher Grant Cameron, and U.S. researcher Richard Dolan, there was mention made of the manner in which the initial two United States Navy Unidentified Aerial Phenomena videos had been "released?" Cameron states that he had seen the images of the material from Mellon's website. He had noted the name on the package which was not Elizondo's or Mellon's. Cameron went on to say that he had checked out this individual via a contact he had in the Pentagon. It turned out that there was such an individual at the Pentagon; it was a female, in Public Relations.

    Despite a check via FaceBook; LinkedIn and Radaris, etc., I have been unable to locate such an individual. Has any blog reader any additional information?


    By Keith Basterfield

    .
     
  6. Dejan Corovic

    Dejan Corovic Celestial

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    These figures appear to be purely summed up.

    If somebody was working on R&D then his or her wage should go under R&D and R&D figure would be much larger. The amount of $380,101 appears small because probably doesn't include wages. Is that right?

    Now, the other thing of interest would be how much is De Longe's wage/salary/remuneration ...
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2020
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  7. Dejan Corovic

    Dejan Corovic Celestial

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    For those who are in the know UFOs are converting electricity into motion, so a decent electronics lab is your starting point. For say 1 GHz lab: oscilloscope, network analyzer, gaussmeter and all the soundry it would cost you $100-150k, no sweat. Higher frequencies cost even more. Say, RB-47 UFO case was clocked by a spy plane at 3GHz. 3GHz lab is two times more expensive than say 1GHz lab. And so on.

    If you want to drag in some shareholders they'll want hard data and for data one needs instrumentation. There is no way around it.

    If one is using special fixtures and he needs PCB design, CAD, 3D printing, and CNC machining work, you can easily add multiple $10k items to your first prototype.

    For vacuum deposition, you can make your own equipment but you are looking for months and months of experimenting and you'll have to count some wages end you'll end up with a sub-par amateurish setup.
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2020
  8. Thomas R. Morrison

    Thomas R. Morrison Meh

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    I don't think it's that simple. Imagine if we could fly a jet interceptor into the 18th century - a scientist of that era would probably decide that the jet was using a steam engine to produce motion. Obviously that would be false; his conclusion would be based on his own limited understanding of science and technology.

    It's possible - even probable, that UFOs/AAVs are using photonic or phononic technologies (or both)...or even some as-yet undiscovered form of science and technology...rather than electronics, in order to exploit the principles of general relativity to produce motion. We can't be sure of -how- these devices work, until we can build one ourselves.
     
  9. Dejan Corovic

    Dejan Corovic Celestial

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    When I said "electricity" I should have used the term "electromagnetism" or EM waves. I guess photonic is the same as EM wave. Or at least one would need to produce electricity to stimulate release of photons.

    When you say "photonic" do you mean photons generated on an atomic level, like lasers?
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2020
  10. Spaceman spiff

    Spaceman spiff Noble

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    Not sure about Bigelow groups study of this phenomenon. Its possible it couldnt stand further scrutiny, and some people like Knapp only bring it up when they wish to sell something. You can call me cynical but if AATIPs science and rigor has been about the same, we can pretty much just forget about this whole thing. Take the whole Skinwalker Ranch ghost story for example. Whats really going on there? Maybe not that much, actually.

    “Tell him what he wants to hear.“ - Ex-BAASS employees have a different perspective on Skinwalker Ranch

    I will however say this. Even an attempt to study the phenomenon is better than no study at all. Take a note mainstream.
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2020
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  11. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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  12. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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  13. 1963

    1963 Noble

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  14. Double Nought Spy

    Double Nought Spy Celestial

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    The Express? Seriously? Nothing similar at the Weekly World News to link? 'Cause their malware is lots better.
     
  15. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    Didn't know they made these 'deepstate toys' lol...

    EnBc-lcW4AEwUnU.jpeg
     
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  16. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    Here's a few more...

    EnCsBECXMAEoRi6.jpeg EnBsdZJW4AA1DIR.jpeg Em8vbm-XIAgOcF-.jpeg Em8VxWTXIAAeB9E.jpeg Em9cbtLW4AASRL8.jpeg
     
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  17. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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  18. pigfarmer

    pigfarmer tall, thin, irritable

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    I have to ask ... is that for real ?
     
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  19. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    I'm really not sure, I'll ask the guy on Twitter who posted these originally...

    ...
     
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  20. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    Nah just fan art, not real...

    ...
     
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