windows 11

nivek

As Above So Below
Bought the wife a new all-in-one computer with Windows 11 already installed.
I set it up for her and after a few months use...well not excited about it.
In some ways it is a bit nicer. In other ways it is a pain in the ass.
IMHO Windows 10 is better, and I still believe Windows 7 is the best so far.

Agreed, out of all the Windows versions, Windows 7 is by far the best one and one that I still use regularly on my laptop...I have a partition with Windows 10 installed on it but rarely use Win10 anymore...

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nivek

As Above So Below
Some interesting and unusual media types listed in this video, some I never heard of before...

 

wwkirk

Celestial
As with every Windows version, there are both UI (user interface) and features changes. With this incarnation, I like some of the changes, dislike others. I like the employment of icons in the context menus for the most frequent tasks (cut, copy, delete, etc.). Something I'm neutral about is that Disk Cleanup is now a separate module. No big deal. But what definitely irritates me is that the Windows/File Explorer Ribbon has been denuded of many of the features it has had since Windows 8.

Online, several PC mavens offered tweaks to restore the Windows 10 Ribbon. This was cool, but then, with the most recent Update, the tweaks were rendered ineffective. Apparently, there is a running battle between official Microsoft programmers and independents to counteract tweaks.

Fortunately, there is a more resilient alternative available. Unlike the tweaks, it is not free, but it is inexpensive. Equally, importantly, it comes with a 100 day free trial, enough time to determine if it is really as good as it seems, as well as to see if it is able to resist future Windows Updates.

I have only been using it for a few days, but so far it is terrific. It permits the user to switch between many Windows 11, Windows 10, and even Windows 7 UI features. Plus you can mix and match many of them.

 

nivek

As Above So Below
Unless I purchase a new laptop or desktop I don't see myself ever using Windows 11...I rarely use Windows 10, except at work where all the computers are Windows 10...The IT guy at work has told us not to upgrade our work computers to Windows 11 if the prompt comes up, I'm not sure the reason for that...

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AD1184

Celestial
Unless I purchase a new laptop or desktop I don't see myself ever using Windows 11...I rarely use Windows 10, except at work where all the computers are Windows 10...The IT guy at work has told us not to upgrade our work computers to Windows 11 if the prompt comes up, I'm not sure the reason for that...
It's likely because the IT guy is not familiar with Windows 11, and businesses usually don't like to be early adopters of new operating systems. Not only can it cause compatibility problems for existing software and hardware, their knowledge about how to troubleshoot issues is now obsolete.

I work in IT in a large multinational corporation, and my team is partly responsible for a number of virtual machines connected to our work environment. We want to keep them as consistent and stable as possible, meaning we want as few updates as the security guys will allow us to get away with. Three years ago we made the transition in that environment to Windows 10 from Windows 7 (skipping Windows 8 entirely), but it entailed a long period of regression testing and bug fixes to make sure that everything would work in Windows 10, and we had to refresh our knowledge about how everything worked under the new operating system. We don't want to upgrade to Windows 11 any time soon, although the IT department will probably force us at some point in the future, I expect it to be a few years yet. Nobody at my workplace is receiving the upgrade notifications at work on their laptops either, and nobody is authorized to make the upgrade, but we have an Active Directory environment configured and group policies which control these things. One thing that is disabled is user control over the Windows version.
 
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