Life on Venus? Major Announcement

Discussion in 'Science, Tech, & Space Exploration' started by nivek, Sep 14, 2020.

  1. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    There's a major announcement coming in 3 hours (11am EST) with much speculation and anticipation that this announcement is going to be a discovery of signs of life in the atmosphere of Venus...

    You can see the announcement live here:

     
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  2. Shadowprophet

    Shadowprophet Truthiness

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    That is mind-blowing, I posted about this on Twitter, The link will lead back to this page at AE. I can't wait :D
     
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  3. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    Less than an hour and half away until the announcement!...

    ...
     
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  4. Shadowprophet

    Shadowprophet Truthiness

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    Yeah, I can't wait, It could be unprecedentedly historic. I wouldn't miss it for the world.
     
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  5. Dejan Corovic

    Dejan Corovic Celestial

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    Half an hour till announcement.
     
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  6. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    Phosphine Detected In The Atmosphere of Venus - An Indicator of Possible Life?

    Keith's note: There is a big press release coming out tomorrow (Monday, 14 September) morning at the Royal Astronomical Society. They want you to know its big news. The press release has been issued in advance to some journalists under embargo - but not others (like us). We have not seen the press release. But according to several sources knowledgeable with the details of the announcement (who are not under embargo) phosphine has been discovered in the atmosphere of Venus. Its presence suggests - suggests - some strange chemistry going on since phosphine is something you'd only expect to see if life (as we know it) was involved.

    Keith's 14 Sep update: Apparently the RAS has changed its mind about how it is going to do their big announcement and a live stream will be presented at 11:00 am EDT here:


    The presence of phosphine is seen by many astrobiologists as a "biosignature" i.e. an indicator of the possible presence of life. The detection was made by the Atacama (ALMA) array located in Chile and the James Clerk Maxwell telescope located in Hawaii. The research team includes members from the University of Manchester, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Cardiff University. A paper will appear in the 14 September issue of Nature Astronomy.

    From what we're told the researchers have concluded that abiotic mechanisms (i.e. ones that do not involve life) that might produce phosphine cannot account for the large amount that they have detected. The phosphine has been detected in the region within the atmosphere of Venus that is considered by some to be potentially habitable. As to what spin the researchers put on this, we'll have to wait for reporters who have the press release or are allowed to participate in the Zoom press conference thing tomorrow at 15:00 GMT to let us know.

    Keith's 11:19 pm EDT update: This video just appeared online. Apparently someone got it from MIT and reposted it on their site - with a somewhat misleading title.

     
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  7. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    So this is quite amazing, it appears signs of life has been discovered on Venus, of course more research is needed and will follow, hopefully we start sending more probes to Venus in the near future...

    They're doing a Q&A now...

    ...
     
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  8. Spaceman spiff

    Spaceman spiff Honorable

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    Pretty cool, most of these discoveries just hint strongly more and more that life is not that uncommon in this universe.
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2020
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  9. The shadow

    The shadow The shadow knows!

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    Venus is a hell. 800 degree heat. High air pressure. Caustic atmosphere. To find life there. Wow simply wow.
     
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  10. Spaceman spiff

    Spaceman spiff Honorable

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    Microbial life can be incredibly tenacious and adaptive. Its been found in some of the most hostile places you could think of even before this, on Earth.

    Its not confirmed, but its pretty close the Venus thing, as they have apparently run out of explanations. Hope its not contaminants from the Venera probes or something like that.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2020
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  11. Dejan Corovic

    Dejan Corovic Celestial

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    I wonder when is NASA going to send a probe to Venus to check this out?
     
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  12. 1963

    1963 Noble

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    A Possible Sign Of Life Right Next Door To Earth, On Venus



    Maybe not quite the extraterrestrial-life proof that most of us were interested in hearing from such illustrious sources ... but nevertheless, an interesting step forward in my opinion! ..and may go a long way in vindicating the views of Professor Chandra Wickramasinghe that was publicly vilified a couple of years ago when he said that he'd found evidence of microbial alien life after sending a balloon to the edge of space. .... I believed his integrity and expertise then, and still do now! :Thumbsup:

    Cheers.

    Sorry Nivek, :oops: i'm always behind the times. :( thanks for shifting it mate! :Thumbsup:
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2020
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  13. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    They stated there's a 'sweet spot' in the atmosphere where the temperature is around 85 degrees or so and hospitable for life as we know it...

    ...
     
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  14. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    Do we have any alloys or engineered materials that can withstand high doses of sulfuric acid?...I'm not sure what types of materials resist sulfuric acid...

    ...
     
  15. Dejan Corovic

    Dejan Corovic Celestial

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    I'm pretty sure that sulfuric acid is not a problem. Chemical engineering is so wast they must have something. Metals would have problems with sulphuric acid, but some inorganic compounds might be very stable and be good as a coating. For example glass, sulphuric acid is held in a glass bottle. Only problem is finding a flexible glass, because spececrafts bend and shake a lot.
     
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  16. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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  17. Dejan Corovic

    Dejan Corovic Celestial

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    It seems that hese Venusian bacteria had been falling on Earth, during Solar wind storms, which is a case of panspermia. They were discovered in Southwest Britain and they are fluorescent. Discovered by British scientist Donald Barber. We don't even need NASA to spend craft to Vinus.

    @nivek, please forward this to Twitter, this will go viral:

    Donald Barber's Invading Bacteria as a Candidate for the Unknown Venusian Ultraviolet Absorber
    https://www.lpi.usra.edu/vexag/may2008/presentations/16Fritziusr.pdf

    Over a 31 year period (1937-1961) astroners at Norman Lockyer observatory in SW England exprienced six rainwater borne bacterial invasions of unidentifiable rapidly liquefying bacteria.

    The bacteria produced swimming pools on astronomical photographic plates during the 45 minutes required for processing. The pools were up to 25 millimeters (1") across and the bacteria stacked up the emulsion silver salts as a walls around them.

    Donald Barber, the chief astronomical assistant in 1948, worked with biologists down in the lowlands (at the Area Laboratories of the National Agricultural Service). They set up a long term water sampling program at the observatory to check for further outbreaks of the rapidly liquefying bacteria.

    Barber reported that the rapid liquefying bacteria were similar in appearance to local indigenous liquefying bacteria. Bacillus (Pleudomonas) fluorescens liquefaciens, which don't cause any significant problems with photographic emulsions, but that the invaders had never been seen before in the terestrial strains. They were remarkably immune to the toxic properties of the photographic silver salts and they were strongly fluorescent.


    please read the rest of the article on the link above ...
     
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  18. Dejan Corovic

    Dejan Corovic Celestial

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    How do I ask question on twitter?
     
  19. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    Type in this hashtag first #AskTeamVenus then type your question and post, it will be found by them...You can also click that hashtag in the above twitter post and go to that page then type your question like this example below...

    Example:

    #AskTeamVenus At what attitude are the phosphine levels at their highest concentration?

    ...
     
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  20. Dejan Corovic

    Dejan Corovic Celestial

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