Mystery Russian Nuclear Explosion

Discussion in 'Present & Current Events' started by nivek, Aug 5, 2019.

  1. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    Huge explosions rock remote Russian military base in Siberia sending hundreds of terrified residents in 13-MILE exclusion zone fleeing for their lives

    A series of huge explosions at a major munitions depot in remote Russia has led to a mass evacuation.

    One person was killed and at least seven wounded at the military store near Achinsk in Siberia, reports suggest. Exploding missiles caused massive fireworks at the depot posing dangers to residents, with a 13-mile radius being evacuated as a giant fire raged.

    But there were reports of soldiers from the military facility next to the exploding ammunition depot hiding in a bomb shelter and unable to escape. 'The territory is cordoned, soldiers can't yet get out of the bomb shelter because explosions continue,' press service of Krasnoyarsk region told Interfax Sibir. Plumes of black smoke rose from the plant in Kamenka village, base of Russia's 74,008 military unit in Krasnoyarsk region.

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  2. Toroid

    Toroid Founding Member

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  3. pigfarmer

    pigfarmer tall, thin, irritable

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  4. pigfarmer

    pigfarmer tall, thin, irritable

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  5. wwkirk

    wwkirk Celestial

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    I don't understand how it could be that only one person was killed.
    Of course, cover-ups are second nature for the Russian government.
     
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  6. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    What is Putin hiding? Emergency lockdown of Russian base after 'nuclear missile' accident


    A RUSSIAN naval base is on a mysterious month-long lockdown after an accidental missile explosion at the base was linked to a sudden radiation spike in the region.

    The world is on alert after a rocket engine explosion on a naval test range in northern Russia was linked to a shock radiation spike. The Kremlin have confirmed the “rocket engine explosion” killed two people and injured six. There are mounting concerns that the explosion took place during the testing of a new nuclear missile.

    Local people were reportedly urged to take precautions against radiation.

    Adding to the fears, the Archangelsk base where the explosion took place has since been placed on emergency lockdown, with the nearby White Sea also closed.

    A Russian expert told the BBC that the Russian Ministry of Defence has refused to disclose the details behind the mysterious lockdown of the base.

    Dr Mark Galeotti said the incident was “clearly a bigger issue than the Russians are letting on”.

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    While the Ministry of Defence has rejected claims of a radiation leak, city officials in nearby Severodvinsk reported a radiation spike between 11:50 and 12:30 before falling and normalising by 14:00.

    Dr Galeotti said: “This depot seems to have been used for the testing of one of Russia’s new liquid-propelled nuclear missiles - it is a highly secretive.

    “The official response from the Defence Ministry has been ‘nothing to see here, no spike in radiation, no leak in radiation’.

    “All we seem to know is the number of dead and injured, and that it was a rocket test. The rest is gossip."

    The Russian expert added: “They have closed off a large swath of the adjoining White Sea to shipping for a month.

    “Despite what the Kremlin have said, there must have been some sort of radiation leak - and they want people to not just stay out of harm’s way, but also don’t want people coming to the site with Geiger Counters.

    “The Defence Ministry is trying to play this down. It is clearly a bigger issue than they are letting on."

    He went to claim "we know the Russian authorities have a tendency to lie in a crisis situation", but highlighted in the modern age they are "able to get away with much less".

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  7. Toroid

    Toroid Founding Member

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    At 26 seconds it looks like there's a possible space based projectile heading for the launch site just as the missile leaves. The near preemptive maneuver indicates it was an AI countermeasure.

    www.youtube.com/watch?v=W1dfD9GAa7o
     
  8. pigfarmer

    pigfarmer tall, thin, irritable

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    Interesting. Not sure what that was.

    North Korean missiles like to blow up on the pad or shortly after launch.

    Wonder if that’s a coincidence. Get rid of one missile on a test, ok. Get rid of the base it came from, much much better. I wonder if these were the hypersonic escape & evade nuclear ICBMs they were bragging up
     
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  9. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    So now Russia is evacuating the town near the 'accident'...Should we expect another explosion there soon or is the radiation spreading further out from that base now?...

    Russia Will "Briefly" Evacuate Village Near Site Of Nuclear-Powered Missile Accident
    Regional authorities have not explained why they're only now telling residents to leave the area five days after the accident.

    Five days after a still very mysterious explosion at a missile test site in northwestern Russia, authorities have announced what they say will be a brief evacuation of a small village nearby, despite saying this was unnecessary in the immediate aftermath of the incident. The announcement comes as evidence mounts that the accident involved a nuclear-powered cruise missile known as Burevestnik.

    Reports of the evacuation of the Nyonoksa, which will reportedly last only around two hours, first emerged on Aug. 13, 2019. Igor Orlov, the governor of the northwestern Arkhangelsk region where the village is located, confirmed that residents were set to briefly leave their homes. Approximately 450 people live in Nyonoksa, which sits right up against the edge of the missile test facility where the explosion occured on Aug. 8, 2019.

    This is "a routine measure," Orlov insisted. Russian officials continue to claim that there was no radiation leak from the accident, despite admissions from the country's main nuclear corporation, Rosatom, that the system that exploded included a nuclear "isotope power source." Local emergency management authorities had initially issued alerts about a spike in ambient radiation, but then took down those notices and referred all related questions to the Russian Ministry of Defense. On Aug. 8, 2019, Orlov had said there was no need for an evacuation.

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    A map showing the general location of Nyonoska.

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    A satellite image showing the location of the village of Nyonoska relative to the missile test site to the north along the coast of the White Sea.

    The evidence that has emerged so far, which The War Zone has been actively reporting on, has increasingly pointed to an accident during a test involving Burevestnik, also known to NATO as the SSC-X-9 Skyfall, or a separate test article related to that development. On Aug. 12, 2019, U.S. President Donald Trump posted a Tweet that seemed to confirm reportsthat the U.S. Intelligence Community was increasingly of this view, as well.

    Though there is limited information available about Burevestnik, the prevailing theory is that it uses a small nuclear reactor rather than traditional fuel to power a ramjet and give it virtually unlimited range. The inherent hazards and risks in such a design, something The War Zonehas written about in detail in the past, make this a particularly controversial program and have led multiple experts to question whether the Russians will ever be able to turn the concept into a practical weapon system.



    Of course, the evacuation, in of itself, does not necessarily suggest that the accident is related to Burevestnik. Nyonoksa residents have told local media outlets that they have had to leave in the past over other apparent mishaps at the nearby test facility. One individual reportedly told ArkhangelskOnline about a past incident where a burning piece of debris fell on their home and started a fire.

    "They said that there were no changes in the radiation background and there was nothing to worry about," another unnamed individual explained to ArkhangelskOnline. "And that everything is fine both in our village and there, in the military town. The situation is checked by experts."

    However, it does seem curious that Russia would only evacuate the village now, days after the accident, given the absence of any subsequent explosions and the Kremlin's insistence that there is no danger of radiological contamination. For comparison, a massive explosion, seen in the video below, and a major fire at an ammunition depot in Siberia on Aug. 5, 2019, almost immediately prompted authorities to ask thousands of people to evacuate the area.



    Still, the purportedly brief nature of the evacuation might be to prevent anyone from seeing the Kremlin bring in specialized vehicles or other equipment to help with the recovery effort that would offer further evidence of Burevestnik presence at the test site or any indications about the actual severity of any radiation leak. Images and video of Russian emergency services personnel wearing protective gear and taking unusual precautions as they transported wounded individuals to hospital in the immediate aftermath of the explosion made it virtually impossible for the Kremlin to deny that there had been a radiological component to the incident.



    It could also allow Russia to remove items from the site with more limited public attention. That being said, two hours seems like a relatively short amount of time for any major movement of materiel, especially if it is heavily contaminated with radiation.

    If nothing else, the Kremlin does appear very keen to control any information coming out of the area. Residents will reportedly depart Nyonoksa tomorrow on board a special train. It is unclear where authorities will take the villagers from there and whether they will have to stay in place for the duration of the evacuation order. There is no indication that Russian officials plan to send the residents anywhere for medical evaluations of any kind, such as possible radiation exposure.

    However, the evacuation does come amid unconfirmed reports that 10 employees of the Arkhangelsk Regional Clinical Hospital, situated in the region's capital of the same name, who had been involved in treating the victims of the explosion have since gone to the Federal Medical Biophysical Center in Moscow for unexplained reasons. That is where three individuals who had suffered injuries in the blast subsequently went for treatment. At least two of those individuals have reportedly since died, adding to the five immediate fatalities from the initial accident.

    "There can be no openness when developing new weapons," Andrey Zolotkov, a nuclear safety expert with Bellona, a Russian environmental group, who is based in Murmansk further to the northwest of Nyonoksa, told The Barents Observer. But then "it is necessary to play it safe while conducting such tests, especially when it involves radiation and nuclear safety," he continued.

    (More on the link)

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  10. coubob

    coubob Celestial

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  11. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    Any country that has a nuclear accident regardless of the application, civilian or military, must be forthcoming with information and details of the accident...A nuclear accident can affect everyone, the whole world, I think it is extremely irresponsible to hide key facts of a nuclear disaster like this...

    Russia's mysterious nuclear accident is shaping up to be the Chernobyl sequel nobody asked for

    MOSCOW -- After an explosion killed five nuclear engineers last week at a northern Russian weapons research center, and reportedly resulted in a spike in radiation in the surrounding region, the Kremlin fell back on old habits: It lied, both about the number of dead and about the radiation.

    Contradictory information out of Moscow and local authorities sparked public fears of a government cover-up of a more serious nuclear accident. Pharmacies in the cities of Arkhangelsk and Severodvinsk reported a run on iodine tablets as costumers bought up supplies believed to reduce the thyroid gland's intake of radioactive iodine.

    By Monday, American intelligence officials seemed to confirm skeptics' fears when their reports suggested the explosion could have involved a nuclear-propelled cruise missile.

    Still, five days after the mysterious accident, the Kremlin has yet to be forthcoming. It raises the question: Has Russia learned anything about transparency since Chernobyl?

    (More on the link)

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  12. Toroid

    Toroid Founding Member

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    They're not in the habit of telling the truth.
     
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  13. pigfarmer

    pigfarmer tall, thin, irritable

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  14. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    We need a LOL appreciation...:laugh8:

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  15. Kchoo

    Kchoo At Peace.

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    When Putin farts....

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  16. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    Russia didn't warn their own professionals of the radiation risk when treating the injured, hiding life threatening details from their own people...

    A cover-up just like Chernobyl: Sixty doctors who treated naked missile technicians wrapped in plastic bags after mystery Russian 'nuclear explosion' are 'flown to Moscow for urgent tests' after they were NOT told of radiation risk
    • Sixty medics at Arkhangelsk hospital, Russia, flown to Moscow for urgent tests
    • Village of Nyonoksa was the nearest site to 'radiation explosion' which killed five
    • Medic was 'not informed about the amount or concentration of isotope found'
    • Three victims arrived naked in bags on August 8 but medics not told full extent
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  17. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    Putin Says ‘Unparalleled’ Weapons Tested at Deadly Nuclear Accident Site
    The Russian president told relatives of the five scientists killed in the August blast that their loved ones were conducting critical work.

    President Vladimir Putin said Thursday that the scientists killed in a mysterious nuclear explosion in northwestern Russia this summer had been testing an “unparalleled” weapon.

    A liquid propulsion system blast on Aug. 8 at a naval missile test facility in Nyonoksa in Arkhangelsk region killed five people and led to a brief radiation spike nearby. Putin said at the time the accident occurred during testing of what he called promising new weapons systems.

    “We’re talking about the most advanced and unparalleled technical ideas and solutions, about weapons designed to ensure Russia’s sovereignty and security for decades to come,” Putin told the victims’ relatives at a televised state awards ceremony in the Kremlin.

    The scientists “were conducting the most complex, responsible and critically important work,” Putin said.

    “The very fact of possessing these unique technologies is the most important reliable guarantee of peace on the planet today,” he added.



    Putin did not identify the weapons involved in the accident but vowed to continue improving them.

    The secrecy surrounding the accident has led outside observers to suggest that the explosion involved the Burevestnik nuclear-powered intercontinental cruise missile, which Putin has said has unlimited range. NATO calls the missile the SSC-X-9 Skyfall.

    Four of Russia’s nuclear radiation monitoring stations went silent days after the explosion, and doctors in the region said they weren’t warned that they were treating patients who had been exposed to radiation.

    Reports later said the deadly explosion occurred during a mission to salvage a lost Burevestnik missile from a previous test.

    Russia tested four of the missiles between November 2017 and February 2018, each resulting in a crash, the U.S. business outlet CNBC previously reported, citing unnamed sources.


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  18. Castle-Yankee54

    Castle-Yankee54 Celestial

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    With only a 13 mile diameter it wouldn't be a nuclear explosion.....it looks like an out of control explosion or perhaps a fairly large conventional one. I'd go with an accidental explosion myself.
     
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  19. pigfarmer

    pigfarmer tall, thin, irritable

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    Careful with That Axe, Eugene .......


    US brings up Russia’s crashed reactor-powered missile in UN disarmament talks

    Presenting his speech to the committee, Thomas G. DiNanno with the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Arms Control, Verification and Compliance was lashing out against both China and Russia saying “they are revisionist in their aims and bent on deploying new, destabilizing weapons.”

    Pointing to Moscow, DiNanno said Russia’s efforts to modernize its nuclear forces have not involved just a replacement of aging systems, but “instead invented new weapons of war that harken back to an age when a nuclear balance of terror reigned.”

    DiNanno then continued by highlighting the White Sea accident.

    “… Russia also has much to answer for regarding the August 8th “Skyfall” incident. The United States has determined that the explosion near Nenoksa, Russia, was the result of a nuclear reaction that occurred during the recovery of a Russian nuclear-powered cruise missile.
     
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  20. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    Indeed, the question isn't one of whether or not it was a nuclear device that detonated, but what type of device was it that exploded, experimental or something else and what as the true nature of the fallout?...It's no doubt an accident, another of many that is being covered up...

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