Books

Discussion in 'Social Hub' started by Athena ashford, Oct 13, 2017.

  1. karl 12

    karl 12 Noble

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    Well just finished this one and it's highly disturbing and highly recommended.


     
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  2. Toroid

    Toroid Founding Member

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    I was looking for information on the Sirians. I wasn't convinced the author of this book was channeling anything. The information was vague and general and I would give it a 2/10. She did write that Sirius C is called Anu.
    Sirius - Wikipedia.
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  3. Toroid

    Toroid Founding Member

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    I just finished reading Peter Moon's book "The Black Sun: Montauk's Nazi-Tibetan Connection" and I would give it a 9.2/10. It's the fourth book in the Montauk series and I'll have to read the other ones.

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  4. wwkirk

    wwkirk Celestial

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    Is it meant to be fiction or non-fiction?
     
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  5. Toroid

    Toroid Founding Member

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    He researched ligament information. I guess you could say there are grey areas.

    White powder gold pops up in other works. Aleister Crowley called it occultum. It was said to have been in the Ark of the Covenant. Raiders of the Lost Ark depicted it as a powder or sand. There was a substance called Zro or manna from heaven the Atlanteans produced that could allow the user to fly and manifest objects. Their civilization revolved around it. The material was referred to as a prototype matter. In the Transylvanian Sunrise series Radu Cinamar (pen name) wrote about a particular type of white powder gold being in an amphora in a 50,000 year old time capsule under the Bucegi Mountains in Romania.

    The book cover shows a blue skinned being (occultum turns the skin blue) laying on the Ark of the Covenant and cherub energy coming out of it. In the background there's a Nazi submarine and the black sun.


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  6. wwkirk

    wwkirk Celestial

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    I gather that his works convey some researched truths via fictional stories.
     
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  7. Toroid

    Toroid Founding Member

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    Truths with interpretations.
     
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  8. August

    August Metanoia

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    1977 Dover edition Discovery of the Tomb of Tutankhamen , Howard Carter and AC Mace. Found it at the local markets yesterday. Nice copy.

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  9. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    Beware of the “Metroplex Monsters” – There are More Than a Few of Them!
    By Nick Redfern

    Over the years I have reviewed books on strange creatures seen in various continents. Countries, too. Even states. But, up until now, this is the very first time I’ve reviewed a book solely absolute an absolute myriad of monsters seen in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex! I have to admit that when you think of numerous strange beasts roaming around, you don’t immediately think of Dallas and Fort Worth. And, I’m from the area! In fact, that’s one of the reasons why I wanted to read and review the book that you will son become familiar wth. I live roughly halfway between Dallas and Fort Worth, and I can say for sure there’s no doubt that the area has its famous monsters, such as the so-called “Goat-Man” that caused terror at Lake Worth in the summer months of 1969. And, every now the local media will get excited by the sighting of what has become known as a “Texas Chupacabra.” Also, there are occasional reports of “Alien Big Cats,” alligators, and that’s about it. Or, at least, I thought that was the end of it. Apparently not. Jason McLean – who I occasionally run into at conferences in the area (or, I did run into him, until the pandemic began) – has written a 122-page book titled Metroplex Monsters: Dallas Demons, Fort Worth Gatmen & Other Terrors of the Trinity River. So, what does the book (published by The History Press) give us? Well, I’ll tell you.

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    My first thought, on getting into the book, was this: how can there been enough material to fill a monster-based book on just the Metroplex? Apparently, quite easily! As for what the Metroplex actually is, there’s this from the Visit Frisco website: “The Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex, commonly referred to as DFW or North Texas, encompasses 13 counties and is home to just over 7 million people. The DFW area encompasses more than 9,200 square miles of total area, making it the largest inland metropolitan area in the United States.” Now, onto the cases that McLean has, himself, investigated. Bigfoot fans won’t be disappointed. After the introduction, the book continues with “Davy Crockett’s Creature: A Brief History of Bigfoot in Texas.” It’s followed by a chapter titled: “What is Texas Bigfoot? Sasquatch or Shaman.” Combined, both chapters provide fascinating material. And, yes Davy Crockett really did have an encounter of the Bigfoot-type. Or, “Wild Man,” as the creatures were known back in the 19th century. Crockett wrote to his brother-in-law, Abner Burgin, that he had seen something bizarre and terrifying: and giant-sized, too. Crockett said: As a Christian man, I swear to you, Abe, that what spirit came upon me was the shape and shade of a large ape man.”

    As for the Shaman theory, McLean says: “…all Bigfoot sightings aren’t an unknown species of giant ape or human cousin but rather are American Indian shamans on spirit journeys or are feral humans. For some American Indian tribes, there are traditions of medicine men going on prolonged sojourns in which tools are left behind to ‘learn the ways of the earth’ and bring those revelations back to the tribe.” He adds that this process “can make those undergoing it appear more like an animal than a human, as the shaman’s hair becomes unruly, and they will adorn themselves with fur.” Well, I know for sure that most Bigfoot researchers in Texas believe that the creatures are simply unknown apes – and that’s it. It will be interesting to see what the Sasquatch community in the Lone Star State will think of that!

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    Of course, McLean has a chapter on the aforementioned Goat-Man of Lake Worth. It’s the area’s equivalent of Nessie: a resident monster. I say “resident” because now and again a report of the man-thing will pop up. If you’re interested in the phenomenon of the Goat-Man, you’ll definitely want to dig into this chapter as it runs to more than ten-pages and contains some cool artworks. The connection between monsters and old bridges appears in the matter of the Texas Goat-Man. And, there are seven-pages devoted to Dallas’ most famous, ghostly character, the Lady of White Rock Lake. I used to live at the lake for around three years and heard a lot of tales of the eerie woman. Equally eerie is the fact that White Rock Lake has a history of a Goat-Man in its midst, too.

    Some of the beasts that McLean gets his teeth into are clearly paranormal, rather than flesh-and-blood (or, at least the way we interpret things). He says: “When discussing the things that go bump in the night, particularly in Texas, one must inevitably address the Lechuza. For those unfamiliar with Spanish, the word lechuza does mean ‘owl’ (a barn or screech owl usually), but it is also the colloquial name for a feared magical being. There’s a cool piece of artwork that demonstrates the appearance of the thing. Monstrous, it surely is! For me the most intriguing chapter is the one that is focused on pterosaur-sightings. Yes, Texas does have a long history of monstrous, winged creatures. McLean reveals the stories of “The Ten Mile Creek Pterosaur;” “The Winged Weirdo of Witch Mountain;” Native American Thunderbirds; and dragons. That leaves us with the area’s not so well-known lake monster: “Ol’ One Eye,” of Lake Granbury. I spent some time out there with cryptozoologist Ken Gerhard about fifteen years ago, but we didn’t find anything. The possibility of the creature being a huge eel is discussed. Or, possibly a large alligator gar. And check out the section on massive catfish – not the kind of thing you want to cross paths with!


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  10. Toroid

    Toroid Founding Member

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    This is the second book in the Montauk series and I'll give it an 8.5/10.
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  11. August

    August Metanoia

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    I like synchronicity seen a bit of that. :)
     
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  12. Non smoking gun

    Non smoking gun Adept

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    The books of Enoch
    This was the focus of the latest episode of Ancient Aliens. Given AA frequently uses an inversion of Occam’s razor for sorting hypotheses (Giorgio’s Razor?), thought best to consult it direct.

    Of AA, the next episode (February 12th) is titled 'William Shatner meets Ancient Aliens'. You couldn't, ahem, make it up.
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2021
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  13. Toroid

    Toroid Founding Member

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    Pyramids of Montauk: Explorations in Consciousness by Peter Moon & Preston Nichols. I would give it an 8.7/10.

    P49. The Montauk Indians spoke a language called Vril. This was an Atlantean tongue. Its origins came from the Enochian language of the angels. Thomas Jefferson tried to preserve the Montauk’s language and created a dictionary. The Montauk Indians, ancient Egyptians and Atlanteans are the only cultures in Earth’s history to use the name pharaoh. Vril is a psychic force. The Atlanteans called it Mash-Mak which is a phonetic approximation to the word Montauk.

    P55. Cairo is Al-Kahira meaning Mars.

    P113. Tahuti was depicted as an ibis and said to reside in the great pyramid. The Greeks called him Thoth and also identified him as Hermes. The Romans called him Mercury and the Hebrews called him Enoch.

    P129. Camelot means Martian city or city of Mars.

    P131-132. The Martians that settled Earth while we were still primates called themselves hu-man because HU stood for the full array of color of God or everything on the electromagnetic spectrum.

    P135. The Law of One became the mystery school of The Eye of Horus.

    P159. The time travel problem began in 1923 when the Thule society collaborated with the Aleister Crowley lodge according to the Thoth/Tahuti. The Black Sun is the center of our galaxy.

    P169. Etymology is the study of word meanings & their origins. It’s an ancient tool of magicians & considered by them to be a sacred science.

    P187. The face on Mars was in honor of the god Sukon.

    P188. Or Seth or Set. The Silver Star refers to Sirius. The ancient name for that constellation is phoenix. The Assyrians & Phoenicians derived their name from it.

    P199. The color black represents the void of creation from which all things are derived. It was a sacred color & was meant to represent the entire electromagnetic spectrum.

    P200. Set was also known as Sept which is where September came from.

    P201. Babylon means Baby Lyon.

    P207. A yantra is a two dimensional glyph designed to evoke a four dimensional experience. 51.51 x 7 is 360.57 or the length of an ancient calendar year.

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  14. August

    August Metanoia

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    Thanks Toroid I have just ordered myself a copy of this. :)
     
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  15. August

    August Metanoia

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    The Pharaoh Paul Morrison 2013. 1st in the Giza Trilogy series. Followed by The Sphinx. I was given the Pharaoh copy today but haven't been able to find the other one yet.

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  16. Standingstones

    Standingstones Celestial

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    For those who like to read Ancient Egypt fiction, you might try these books by author Paul Doherty.... 1. An Evil Spirit Out Of The West... 2. The Season Of The Hyaena...3. The Year Of The Cobra. These three books are called the Akhenaten Trilogy. Highly recommended.
     
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  17. Standingstones

    Standingstones Celestial

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    The covers to the Paul Doherty books.....



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  18. August

    August Metanoia

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    7,879
  19. pigfarmer

    pigfarmer tall, thin, irritable

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    I generally don't read books like these - 'war porn' and doesn't hold my interest. Some first person accounts like Eugene Sledge's With the Old Breed are riveting. SOG caught my attention through a podcast and I picked up Billy Waugh's book. Talk about a lifetime of adventure, holy crap ! Very readable for a wider audience.

    A more narrow look at SOG is John Plaster's book, which has so many great first person harrowing accounts they all blur and become a bit monotonous. When you realize what he lived through and what it looked like - something he vividly describes - it's sobering.

    These books serve to give a pretty good peek at what US asymmetric warfare, how it started, what it looked like and what it's like now. We like to bandy around terms like 'Special Forces' and 'Black Ops' and make all sorts of pop culture based assumptions about capabilities, intent, behavior. Just finished a book about DB Coper and of course there's always speculation about his backbround. All I can say is if he had a background like those in that mysterious Studies and Observations group then yup, he could've easily done it and laughed at all of us. A milk run by comparison

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    Last edited: Feb 28, 2021
  20. JahaRa

    JahaRa Noble

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    907
    Are these books history or fiction?
     

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