Mars

Discussion in 'Science, Tech, & Space Exploration' started by Toroid, Jul 21, 2018.

  1. Dejan Corovic

    Dejan Corovic Noble

    Messages:
    941
    Another interesting point implicit in this NASA's publicity photo is would astronauts be allowed to practice Earth-Mars polygamy? Judging by the age group of astronauts in that photo, most of them, if not all, must already be married. Or put simply, can astronaut be legally married to one person on Earth and another person on Mars?
     
    • Like Like x 1
  2. pigfarmer

    pigfarmer tall, thin, irritable

    Messages:
    3,297
    Well, not in this sense.

    I'd think they'll have their birth control sorted out. But if you coop people up in a small space long enough there is a good chance they'll have tickets to the F train.
    [​IMG]
     
  3. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

    Messages:
    18,529
    Yeah I know Scott Waring is a nut, this is more amusing than anything else lol...

     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  4. pigfarmer

    pigfarmer tall, thin, irritable

    Messages:
    3,297
    looks more like an ancient crankshaft to me
    upload_2020-7-11_6-36-34.jpeg
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  5. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

    Messages:
    18,529
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 2
  6. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

    Messages:
    18,529
    NASA's new Mars rover successfully launches

    As the sun rose over Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida this morning, the Perseverance rover - which sat atop an Atlas V rocket - soared into the heavens in spectacular fashion. After a journey spanning 60 million miles, it will touch down on Mars in February of next year.

    Intended as a follow-up to the space agency's long-lived Curiosity rover which has been trundling around on Mars since 2012, Perseverance looks very similar to its predecessor. Inside however, it has been equipped with several new additions including a helicopter drone and new scientific instruments designed to search for evidence that Mars was habitable in the distant past.


    The rover will also be tasked with collecting samples of soil and leaving them in special caches for a future rover to come and retrieve as part of an ambitious sample-return mission. Once it reaches Mars we can expect to see a plethora of photographs from its array of 23 cameras and even audio samples, as it has also been equipped with microphones.

    "We hope to capture some of the sounds of entry, descent and landing; and some of the sounds of driving around, merging that with the video we can take," said Perseverance team member Jim Bell. You can check out the full launch broadcast below (for the actual launch skip to 48:00).


     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  7. pigfarmer

    pigfarmer tall, thin, irritable

    Messages:
    3,297
    Helicopter on Mars. That's worth saying again. We put a freaking helicopter on Mars. Well, I hope so. That's the plan anyway.

    Amazing that people are going apeshit in the streets and we doing cool stuff like this at the same time. Very 1968ish.

    Antigravity drive is all fine and well but who doesn't love a good countdown to a rocket launch?

     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Awesome Awesome x 2
  8. Dejan Corovic

    Dejan Corovic Noble

    Messages:
    941
    Good luck to the new rover.

    But it takes far more sense to commercialise the Moon first, than to colonize Mars.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. Dejan Corovic

    Dejan Corovic Noble

    Messages:
    941
    To be more specific about the Moon, Moon is loaded with some isotope of Helium, maybe it's called Deuterium.

    A cubic centimeter of that isotope can run the power supply of New York for 6 months. So it's clean and green energy at it's best. And in practically unlimited quantities, replenished gratis by Solar wind.
     
  10. pigfarmer

    pigfarmer tall, thin, irritable

    Messages:
    3,297
    Part of any voyage of exploration is the journey itself, the science involved and cooperation with other countries in some cases. The benefits are less obvious but they are there.

    But the Moon seems like a useful pile of stuff right in our back yard and I agree it does seem a more practical destination, as these things go.
     
  11. Dejan Corovic

    Dejan Corovic Noble

    Messages:
    941
    If that isotope can be used as rocket fuel, it makes sense to fly to Moon first, fill-up the tanks with isotope, and then continue to Mars, Titan, asteroid belt, etc.
     
  12. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

    Messages:
    18,529
    Helium is far too valuable to us for medical applications and in extremely short supply to use as a rocket fuel...As it is we are wasting Helium on party balloons...

    ...
     
  13. Dejan Corovic

    Dejan Corovic Noble

    Messages:
    941
    Here is full MIT article. It's He3

    Mining the Moon

    That's why Mars is waste of time. We should better start mining that He3. It can do 80% coversion to energy in a fusion reaction. One can power both industry and use it as rocket fuel.
     
  14. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

    Messages:
    18,529
    Yes we need to put boots on Mars, I am all for it, as soon as our technology can support humans on Mars I believe we need to be there...I hope to see humans walk on Mars in my lifetime, but damn we are going to be flying a helicopter on Mars soon...That is the coolest thing ever lol...

    ...
     
    • Agree Agree x 1

Share This Page