Strange & Bizarre News

Discussion in 'Present & Current Events' started by nivek, Apr 6, 2019.

  1. pigfarmer

    pigfarmer tall, thin, irritable

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    Evil robots by any chance ?
     
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  2. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    'It's happening': Ice worms emerge in Pacific Northwest glaciers

    "It's happening," scientist Scott Hotaling told a reporter for OPB as he gestured across Paradise Glacier high up on Mount Rainier in Washington. He was referencing hundreds of thousands of tiny, black worms emerging from a vast expanse of white snow.

    Ice worms were first discovered in 1887 on Alaska's Muir Glacier. They have since been spotted on most of the coastal glaciers in Alaska, British Columbia, Washington and Oregon. It was an exciting discovery because, for the longest time, biologists considered high-altitude glaciers sterile places where life was essentially impossible.

    “I think they're like the mascot of mountain glaciers in the West," Hotaling told AccuWeather about ice worms. They're incredibly cool, they're incredibly abundant and they're the largest organism on Earth that spends its whole life cycle in ice. "When they're around, there are hundreds per square meter. You cannot walk without stepping on them...so, it's a very dramatic thing when they are present."

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    The inky, black ice worms are only about an inch long and are distant cousins to earthworms. Instead of dirt, these worms wiggle through glacial ice eating snow algae, bacteria and anything else that ends up on the snow.

    They may spend their entire lives in snow and ice, but ice worms can't survive subfreezing temperatures. Hotaling has conducted thermal testing and says the ice worms can survive comfortably for at least a day or two in temperatures as high as 75 degrees Fahrenheit (around 24 degrees Celsius), and although they thrive at temperatures around 32 degrees Fahrenheit (zero degrees Celsius), they die when temperatures drop below that threshold.

    “It's kind of hilarious in a way that this is worm is living in ice and can’t actually survive freezing, but it's also really interesting ecologically because they are living extremely close to their lower thermal limit," Hotaling said.

    Ice worms typically emerge in the afternoon and at dusk. The worms have barely been studied so researchers aren't sure why, but Hotaling says they are extremely tolerant of UV rays and thinks they come up to get heat energy from the sun and find food.

    "They actually have a lot of pigment, which I think is largely to absorb heat from solar radiation and that's why they come out to be at the surface, get some heat," he told AccuWeather, adding that it "helps their metabolism and various biochemistry while they're also feeding in the soft upper layer of snow."

    (More on the link)

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  3. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    Man, 81, who has lived off-the-grid in small solar-paneled cabin in New Hampshire woods for THREE DECADES is arrested for 'squatting on private property'

    An 81-year old New Hampshire man has lived in a remote cabin along the Merrimack River in New Hampshire for nearly three decades, but was forced off the property and arrested on July 15 as the owner plans to tear it down.


    David Lidstone, a U.S. Air Force veteran and father of four, is behind bars on a civil contempt sanction for squatting illegally for 27 years. A judge has said that he could be released, however, if he agrees not to return to the cabin and lets its owner demolish it.

    'He holds the keys to the jailhouse in his hands,' Judge Andrew Schulman said. 'He can open the door and leave whenever he'd like. All he has to do is agree to abide by the court's prior orders.'

    But Lindstone refuses to leave what he's come to know as his home.

    He told Schulman, 'You came with your guns, you arrested me, brought me in here, you´ve got all my possessions. You keep ´em. I´ll sit here with your uniform on until I rot, sir.'

    The wooden, two-level A-frame cabin is near the Muchyedo Bank, and in between the Merrimack River and Interstate 93. It is fitted with solar panels and a wooden balcony. It's interior features a cluttered kitchen with pots hanging from the ceiling, some appliances, and curtains on the windows.

    Lindstone, who is known by local boaters and kayakers as 'River Dave,' created a footstool with a base made of stacked beer cans, which sits on his porch. He's attached lights, a mirror and a pulley for a clothesline to logs supporting the cabin. He has grown his own food, cut his own firewood, and tended to a pet cat and chickens.

    Near the home is a gravel path leading to vegetable garden plots outlined by logs and some berry bushes. Lidstone gets his water from a stream and often spends time along the Merrimack River.

    (More on the link)

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  4. wwkirk

    wwkirk Celestial

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    I sympathize with him, but the only practical solution I can think of is if someone with property were to give him permission to live free on their land. He had an agreement, but it was with the previous owner.
     
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  5. pigfarmer

    pigfarmer tall, thin, irritable

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    Property owner Leonard Giles, 86, of South Burlington, Vermont, owns several plots of land through New Hampshire. He claimed that he didn´t even know Lidstone was there until the town administrator found out in 2015 and told him, expressing concern 'with regard to the solid and septic waste disposal and the potential zoning violations created by the structure,' according to a complaint filed by Giles in 2016.

    Who knows the real story, but if the property owner - who is older than this guy - is on the hook financially for this he is within his rights. Would be nice to see a GoFundMe or the like to find some accommodation for him.

    Personable or not, harmless or not, he's a squatter. Being a landlord with people who don't pay and can't be evicted is an old story
     
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  6. wwkirk

    wwkirk Celestial

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    New Development!
    'River Dave's' cabin at center of property dispute burns to the ground hours after court hearing
     
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  7. pigfarmer

    pigfarmer tall, thin, irritable

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    poor guy
     
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  8. JahaRa

    JahaRa Noble

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    In New Mexico, if no one complains for 10 years then the squater has property rights and the owner has to go to civil court to get compensation but cannot evict.
     
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  9. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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  10. Standingstones

    Standingstones Celestial

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    What can you say. People standing near a tower taking photos in a lightning storm. Not the smartest thing to do.
     
  11. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    Utah Authorities Concerned About People Hammocking Atop Power Lines

    Authorities in Utah are sounding the alarm about a weird and worrisome trend wherein people hammock atop power lines. The Weber County Sheriff's Office made note of the unnerving fad in a Facebook post last week, explaining that they have seen a troubling increase in thrill-seekers attempting to pull off the far-from-relaxing feat. The department shared a photo showing two such individuals ascending a power line tower with one of the climbers having already reached a rather nerve-wracking height.

    The department understandably expressed considerable concern over the dangerous practice, noting that these would-be hammockers are sometimes forced to deftly cross over power lines connected to the tower as they make their way to the top. According to their post, the cables "carry 75,000 kilovolts" that can actually jump from the lines, presumably when someone gets too close. Calling the hammocking craze "extremely risky," the department implored residents to not jump on the proverbial bandwagon as "we would really hate to see someone injured from either a fall or electrocution."

     
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  12. dr wu

    dr wu Noble

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    It's simply amazing the strange things people will do.... :wacko8:
     
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  13. wwkirk

    wwkirk Celestial

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    Hawaiian homeless man arrested in case of mistaken identity spent years in mental hospital: report

    Hawaii Innocence Project asking for judge to set record straight


    [The highlighted portions are truly Kafkaesque.]

    Hawaii officials wrongly arrested a homeless man for a crime committed by someone else, locked him up in a state hospital for more than two years, forced him to take psychiatric drugs and then tried to cover up the mistake by quietly setting him free with just 50 cents to his name, the Hawaii Innocence Project said in a court document asking a judge to set the record straight.


    A petition filed in court Monday night asks a judge to vacate the arrest and correct Joshua Spriestersbach's records. The filing lays out his bizarre plight that started with him falling asleep on a sidewalk. He was houseless and hungry while waiting in a long line for food outside a Honolulu shelter on a hot day in 2017.

    When a police officer roused him awake, he thought he was being arrested for the city's ban on sitting or laying down on public sidewalks.

    But what he didn't realize was that the officer mistook him for a man named Thomas Castleberry, who had a warrant out for his arrest for violating probation in a 2006 drug case.

    It's unclear how this happened as Spriestersbach and Castleberry had never met. Spriestersbach somehow ended up with Castleberry as his alias, even though Spriestersbach never claimed to be Castleberry, according to the Hawaii Innocence Project.

    Spriestersbach's attorneys argue it all could have been cleared up if police simply compared the two men's photographs and fingerprints.

    Instead, against Spriestersbach's protests that he wasn't Castleberry, he was eventually committed to the Hawaii State Hospital.

    "Yet, the more Mr. Spriestersbach vocalized his innocence by asserting that he is not Mr. Castleberry, the more he was declared delusional and psychotic by the H.S.H. staff and doctors and heavily medicated," the petition said. "It was understandable that Mr. Spriestersbach was in an agitated state when he was being wrongfully incarcerated for Mr. Castleberry’s crime and despite his continual denial of being Mr. Castleberry and providing all of his relevant identification and places where he was located during Mr. Castleberry’s court appearances, no one would believe him or take any meaningful steps to verify his identity and determine that what Mr. Spriestersbach was telling the truth – he was not Mr. Castleberry."

    No one believed him — not even his various public defenders until a hospital psychiatrist finally listened.

    All it took were simple Google searches and a few phone calls to verify that Spriestersbach was on another island when Castleberry was initially arrested, according to the court document.

    The psychiatrist asked a detective to come to the hospital, who verified fingerprints and photographs to determine the wrong man had been arrested and Spriestersbach spent two years and eight months institutionalized, the petition said, noting that it wasn't hard to determine the the real Castleberry has been incarcerated in an Alaska prison since 2016.

    According to records, a 49-year-old man named Thomas R. Castleberry is in the Spring Creek Correctional Facility in Seward, Alaska. His relatives couldn't be reached for comment. The Alaska public defender listed for him declined to comment Tuesday.

    The Hawaii Innocence Project document also claims Spriestersbach had ineffective counsel: the Hawaii public defender's office.

    Police, the state public defender's office, the state attorney general and the hospital "share in the blame for this gross miscarriage of justice," the petition said.

    Hawaii Public Defender James Tabe, Gary Yamashiroya, special assistant to the attorney general and Matt Dvonch, a spokesman for the Honolulu prosecuting attorney's office, declined to comment Tuesday.
    Once the fingerprints and photographs were verified, officials moved quickly, but secretly, to release Spriestersbach in January 2020, the petition said.

    "A secret meeting was held with all of the parties, except Mr. Spriestersbach, present. There is no court record of this meeting or no public court record of this meeting. No entry or order reflects this miscarriage of justice that occurred or a finding that Mr. Spriestersbach is not Thomas Castleberry," the court document said.

    His lawyers said officials didn't think anyone would believe Spriestersbach or no one would care about the homeless man who fell asleep waiting for food, only to wake up to a living nightmare.

    Spriestersbach, 50, who lives with his sister in Vermont, declined to comment for this story.
    His sister, Vedanta Griffith, spent nearly 16 years looking for him. He moved to Hawaii with Griffith when her husband was stationed on Oahu with the Army in 2003. He moved to the Big Island and then disappeared, while suffering mental health issues, she said.

    "Part of what they used against him was his own argument: ‘I’m not Thomas Castleberry. I didn’t commit these crimes. ... This isn’t me,’" she told The Associated Press. "So they used that as saying he was delusional, as justification for keeping him."

    After his release, he ended up at a homeless shelter, which contacted his family.
    "And then when light is shown on it, what do they do? They don’t even put it on the record. They don’t make it part of the case," Griffith said. "And then they don’t come to him and say, ‘We are so sorry’ or, how about even ‘Gee, this wasn’t you. You were right all along.’"

    Spriestersbach now refuses to leave his sister’s 10-acre property.

    "He’s so afraid that they’re going to take him again," Griffith said.


     
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  14. wwkirk

    wwkirk Celestial

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    I had actually thought "you must be delusional because you're affirming (or denying) your identity" was just a Movies/TV trope. It's terrifying to find out it can happen in real life.
     
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  15. wwkirk

    wwkirk Celestial

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  16. pigfarmer

    pigfarmer tall, thin, irritable

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  17. nivek

    nivek As Above So Below

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    upload_2021-8-8_9-41-20.png

    Hermit 'River Dave', 81, vows to rebuild shack that mysteriously burned to the ground as he's released from jail for squatting on private property for 27 years

    A hermit known as 'River Dave' has vowed to rebuild his shack that mysteriously burned down after he was jailed for squatting on private property for nearly three decades in New Hampshire. 'It's all physical stuff,' David Lidstone told NBC10 Boston on Thursday after he was released from jail for trespassing.

    'It's what you have in friends that counts. These multimillionaires and billionaires - I'm happier than they are,' he said.

    The cabin was located in New Hampshire along the Muchyedo Bank in Merrimack County in between the Merrimack River and Interstate 93. Lidstone had been living on the property for 27 years.

    It had solar panels but no other electricity. He has grown his own food, cut his own firewood, and tended to his pets and chickens.


    (More on the link)

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  18. HAL9000

    HAL9000 Honorable

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    Hell, The guy was 81. What harm was he doing ?

    Not as if he was trying to start a commune or something.
     
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  19. wwkirk

    wwkirk Celestial

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    'River Dave' speaks about support after home fire, court battle

    "All signs are pointing towards an accidental fire," said chief Michael Gamache. "It was caused by a human but it was certainly not intentional. Keep in mind, this investigation is still open."
    Gamache said the cause may be tied to the dismantling of solar panels or the use of power tools to cut metal on the roof. But officials said there is no evidence to suggest foul play.


    Fire officials: No evidence blaze that destroyed River Dave’s cabin was intentionally set


    The Canterbury Fire Department said in a statement that there was no evidence that the fire was set intentionally or that a crime had taken place, and “nowhere near enough evidence to consider criminal charges.”

    “The investigation, led by an investigator from the N.H. State Fire Marshall’s Office, indicates a probability that this fire began as a result of unintentional/ accidental means,” Canterbury Fire officials said.

    Canterbury Fire Chief Michael Gamache said a representative of the property owner had been at the cabin less than an hour before the fire.

    The fire marshal’s team is still investigating potential causes, including whether metal cutting saws used on the cabin or disassembled solar panels created sparks.

    Gamache said the fire marshal still has interviews to conduct before the investigation is completed.
     
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  20. wwkirk

    wwkirk Celestial

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    Some conspiracy theories are fun, others tragic.


    California dad killed his kids over QAnon and 'serpent DNA' conspiracy theories, feds allege


    Aug. 11, 2021, 7:47 PM EDT

    By Doha Madani, Andrew Blankstein and Ben Collins

    A California surfing school owner who was charged with killing his two children in Mexico is a follower of QAnon and Illuminati conspiracy theories who thought the children "were going to grow into monsters so he had to kill them," federal officials alleged.

    Matthew Taylor Coleman, 40, was charged Wednesday with foreign murder of U.S. nationals in connection with the death of his 2-year-old son and his 10-month-old daughter, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Central District of California. Authorities said Coleman confessed to the killings and told the FBI that he used a spear fishing gun to stab them.
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    Matthew Taylor Coleman.

    A criminal complaint alleges that he told the FBI that he killed his children because he believed they "were going to grow into monsters" and that conspiracy theories led him to believe that his wife had passed down her "serpent DNA" to the children.

    Coleman's wife, identified only by her initials, contacted Santa Barbara police after her husband had taken the kids out on Saturday but didn't tell her where they were going, the complaint said. She grew concerned after he failed to respond to her messages, and, knowing that her husband didn't have a car seat with him, she called police.

    A missing person's report was filed Sunday, and officers asked her to use Apple's Find My iPhone feature to see whether she could find Coleman, the complaint said. The program showed Coleman's last known location in Rosarito, Mexico, it said.

    Police alerted the FBI to the investigation as it became a case of suspected parental kidnapping. Coleman was detained Monday after an inspection by border protection agents of his van upon his re-entry into the U.S., where agents didn't see his children and found blood in the vehicle, authorities said.

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    Forensic technicians at the scene where two young U.S. children were found dead in Rosarito, Mexico, on Monday.Reuters

    The complaint alleges that Coleman confessed to the killings upon being interviewed Monday and gave authorities the location of the murder weapon and the discarded bloody clothing. He also identified two bodies recovered by Mexican authorities as those of his children, it said.

    A judge ordered that Coleman be held without bond Wednesday and scheduled his arraignment for Aug. 31.

    According to the complaint, Coleman said that he knew what he did was wrong but that "it was the only course of action that would save the world."

    "Serpent DNA" is a likely to be a reference to the "lizard people" conspiracy theory, which falsely purports that reptilian aliens secretly run the world and have taken over important positions in government, banking and Hollywood.

    The complaint says Coleman told authorities that he learned about "serpent DNA" through QAnon and Illuminati conspiracy theories, even though the lizard people conspiracy theory predates both by several decades.

    The believers in each conspiracy theory have melded together over the last several years because conspiracy theory influencers and algorithms on social media frequently lump the theories together.

    QAnon is a more recent conspiracy theory premised on the belief that a similar global cabal at the top of the U.S. government is secretly murdering and eating children and that Donald Trump was quietly working to defeat them during his time in office.

    Anthony Quinn Warner, who bombed his own RV outside an AT&T building in Nashville, Tennessee, on Christmas Day, claimed that lizard people were taking over Hollywood and the U.S. government. Warner died and three other people were injured.
     

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